Here at Econsultancy we’re all about encouraging the quickest, easiest journey from product page to checkout as possible. Not just from a conversion point of view but also from a customer experience one.

This is certainly true of customers who know exactly what they want and don’t have to do any research about the product itself. ”I want a Julio Iglesias Greatest Hits CD and I want it now damn it!”

However if a product is particularly new or has an original innovative feature it may be difficult to demonstrate this to a consumer outside of a physical retail space.

So for the online retailers of these products this presents a dual problem. Relaying the product information in a clear, effective way, while retaining the user’s interest throughout the experience and encouraging them towards checkout. 

Here we present 12 product pages, which require a certain amount of time and interaction to fully explore their features, whilst still providing an exemplary ecommerce experience.

B&O Play

This scrolling landing page lets you explore the various features of the headphones at your own speed, while a captivating full-screen video plays in the background.

The highlight of this is the mini-videos that you can click to see how certain gestures activate different functionality. 

Brickfielder

This company makes golfing apparel, but nothing like your Grandad’s garish polo shirt. Here’s an incredibly thorough look at the technology behind its latest sweater using a plethora of interactive scrolling and swiping techniques.

Converse 

The create your own sneakers tool is genuinely fantastic, easy to use, quick and every element on the shoe is customisable. Look at this monstrosity…

Quechua

I don’t even like camping but the ‘My Second Home’ tool which allows you to custom build your own tent from various component parts has come the closest in persuading me otherwise.

And here’s a bonus Gif to show you how it works.

Björn Borg

A very simple idea, as you scroll back and forth you can see how each product looks when in its reflective state.

Ikea

I’ve mentioned this before in our round-up of ghost button design, but the use of full-screen video in which products can be seen in a real-life setting is a great method of persuasion, especially if there are direct links to the products from the video itself. 

Nike

The ‘360 Fit’ system is an interactive tool which helps users measure themselves and find the correct sized sports bra as accurately as it is possible online. This is aided by a series of mini video tutorials.

Bellroy

A perennial favourite on the blog, Bellroy’s ‘slim your wallet’ tool provides an excellent visual representation of how its wallet can reduce the space in your pocket.

Geox

An interactive video where you can change the weather conditions, alter the course of a romantic comedy and see how Geox’s Amphibiox shoes adapt to all climates.

G3 Skis

It’s difficult to convey exactly how good a pair of skis are, not just online but also in the middle of Welwyn Garden City high street, but Genuine Guide Gear makes a good crack at it. With large images, nicely laid-out product info, pop-out info boxes and an excellent product video.

Sit on Everything

It’s basically just a cube you can sit on, but the opportunities to customise are endless.

Mack

In the same way that clothes shops are using clustering to see how entire ‘looks’ can be created and purchased, here you can hover over individual items in the room and purchase them or if you’re feeling even more extravagant, buy the entire room.

Further reading…

For more web design trends from the blog check out: