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 UK advertisers are responding to the consumer shift towards mobile and tablets by investing in mobile search.

Data from Marin Software’s Online Advertising Q2 2012 report show that mobile devices accounted for 13% of search spend in June 2012, yet took a 20% share of clicks.

This tallies with data from IgnitionOne which shows that mobile search made up 14% of total search advertising spend in Q2, up slightly from 12.3% in Q1.

Similarly, Q1 stats reported by Adobe show that mobile now accounts for 8% of US search spend compared to 11% in the UK.

According to Marin’s report, mobile devices are also showing a higher CTR compared to desktops, as well as delivering lower CPC. Relative to desktop search, volumes are growing faster than budgets, resulting in less expensive clicks on mobile campaigns. 

This presents a great customer acquisition opportunity for brands, yet many are failing to take advantage.

We recently looked at mobile search and PPC in the finance industry and found that only six out of the 15 paid search results linked to mobile sites.

Looking at the overall performance of search spend, UK advertisers saw paid search click volumes rise by 52% accompanied by an 85% increase in impression volumes. 

Meanwhile, CPC remained flat while the CTR declined. Marin suggests that the increasing volume of impressions indicates the continued growth of search advertising for marketers in the UK.

The report also looks at the performance of Facebook advertising across various markets.

It shows that UK advertisers get a lower CTR than those in the Eurozone and US, while also experiencing a higher CPC.

The data is from the Marin Global Online Advertising Index, which includes over 1,800 advertisers and agencies that invest over $4bn annually in biddable media through the Marin platform.

David Moth

Published 12 July, 2012 by David Moth @ Econsultancy

David Moth is Editor and Head of Social at Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or connect via Google+ and LinkedIn

1682 more posts from this author

Comments (2)

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Chris Ainsworth

Hi David, great data thanks for sharing this information. Interesting to see that smartphone CTR not just the higher percentage, it's over twice as much as desktop CTR, with tablets not far being either! This combined with the lower CPC making mobile campaigns essential and great value!

about 4 years ago

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Michael Essany

We are seeing more and more of these studies with each passing quarter. Advertisers have never had more incentive to direct their scarce marketing dollars into the mobile channel. But I think it's worth noting that tablet and smartphone adoption is only one part of today's successful mobile advertising equation. Mobile advertising doesn't work by simply flinging cash at mobile devices. Relevant, targeted messaging is responsible for the majority of successful mobile ad campaigns we've seen - campaigns that have contributed significantly to the overall growth of the industry. There was an excellent post about the value of savvy mobile messaging on the Airpush blog recently - http://www.airpush.com/blog/redesigning-messaging-relevance-how-we-grew-to-2/

about 4 years ago

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