{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Building a performant website that delivers a quality experience to the rapidly growing number of consumers surfing the web on mobile and tablet devices may often be a challenging task, but that doesn't mean that users are willing to cut companies any slack.

In fact, tablet users expect websites to load in under three seconds, and smartphone users only slightly more patient with a four second expectation.

That's according to a study published this week by testing and monitoring solutions provider Keynote Systems. It surveyed more than 5,000 individuals about their browsing habits and expectations.

Of those polled who were smartphone users, a full two-thirds indicated that their biggest gripe was slow-loading web pages. What constitutes slow-loading? Well over half (64%) of smartphone users want a web page to load within four seconds; the vast majority (82%) expect it to load within five. Tablet users had even higher expectations: 60% of them want a page to load within three seconds. Other surveys have produced similar results.

Obviously, there are a lot of things that are out of the control of companies when it comes to their mobile and tablet experiences. Users connecting via mobile networks may experience latency due to the quality of their connection; even WiFi connections are susceptible to degradation.

But even though such things are out of a company's control, it's clear that users don't really care which party is responsible for poor performance: according to Keynote Systems, 16% of users will leave and not return if your pages don't load fast enough. And 6% will leave for a competitor.

These numbers highlight why it's so important to optimize for mobile and tablet experiences. A mobile or tablet site that looks good isn't enough. And addressing common issues that could be slowing down your website down may not be enough either. Look at mobile and tablet-specific issues and benchmarking performance on common devices and platforms will arguably become a must to stay competitive and meet user expectations.

Patricio Robles

Published 8 August, 2012 by Patricio Robles

Patricio Robles is a tech reporter at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter.

2377 more posts from this author

Comments (8)

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Tara West

Tara West, Senior Biddable Media Manager at Tara West

Having a mobile optimised site is so important! I always recommend clients have a good mobile version of their site. It's stupid not to if you are already getting traffic from mobile devices, it would be like choosing to ignore a big chunk of the market that is already actively looking for your product and making it difficult for them to buy it. Optimising your mobile site so that images load faster is much more cost effective marketing than trying to bring in other new potential customers. Make the most of the ones that are already trying to use your site!

almost 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Toni Aničić

@Tara,

The hardest thing is explaining to someone who doesn't browse the internet through mobile phone so much that his audience is different than him. Even if you show the data, people often think that everyone uses their website just like they do.

almost 4 years ago

Tara West

Tara West, Senior Biddable Media Manager at Tara West

That is very true Toni. You could try projecting a conversion rate for their current mobile traffic (if they were to get a decent mobile site) based on their desktop devices conversion rate. Once you start talking about value and conversions clients often come round to your point of view!

almost 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Deri Jones, CEO at SciVisum.co.uk

This theme kind of fits into the earlier discussion, about Responsive websites : RWD.

It's important to ensure that the resulting experience work for everyone - desktops, mobiles and tablets.

But because they have different User Journey routes, and users get differently built pages on the way - it can be easy to end up with mobile/tablet experience that is slow.

Monitoring the mobile journeys 24/7 will help flag this up.

almost 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Deri Jones, CEO at SciVisum.co.uk

'Alerting if slow' is good too, by setting quality slowness thresholds.

We've found it really useful to have Alert SMS and emails sent out if a particular page in the journey is slow - or if the journey overall is slow.

Certainly it's not enough if you just rely on the team doing page speed tests whilst they are in the office - as you'll miss out that the mobile journeys are slow every Thursday night at 8pm when the traffic is highest, for example.

almost 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

John Godwin, User Experience at SSE

When building a website whether it be specifically for mobile, tablet, desktop or even using RWD, fundamentally the design and build process must follow certain rules around page speed and file sizes.

Checking redundant code, optimising images and minimising http requests within pages are just some of the ways you can reduce page load times. Create benchmarks for each area of development and make sure they pass certain speed checks, this can be achieved without affecting design or functionality.

almost 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Scott

Tablet speeds are going to become increasingly important. For one, people see them more as laptop replacements than mobile replacements. So the expectations for the tablet experience is going to be higher. Also, a ton of eCommerce is starting to move toward the tablet form factor, and it's well documented that speedy sites correlate with higher conversion rates.

almost 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Natalie Tsang, CEO at Revealed Technology

I agree, @Deri.

We've found that using the delta between clicks purchased and page views received can be a good way to understand how many users are abandoning a page because of speed issues. For anyone driving paid traffic to their site on something like Google Adwords, this can be easy to track (and Adwords pushes traffic to mobile devices by default).

almost 4 years ago

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Daily_pulse_signup_wide

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Daily Pulse newsletter. Each weekday, you ll receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.