Bloggers that published a key for the encryption on some High Definition DVDs are in big trouble, according to a copyright protection group.

The issue exploded on Digg this week, when users began posting the code on the site. Digg initially responded to a cease and desist notice from the AACS by removing the posts and blocking some accounts, but then backed down in the face of user protests.

Now, it seems, the AACS, an industry body founded by Microsoft, Sony, Warner Bros, and Disney,  amongst others, is looking to hold these bloggers to account.

Michael Ayers of the AACS told the BBC:

"There is no intent from us to interfere with people's right to discuss copy protection. We respect free speech. They can discuss the pros and cons. We know some people are critical of the technology."

"But a line is crossed when we start seeing keys being distributed and tools for circumvention. You step outside of the realm of protected free speech then."

Graham Charlton

Published 4 May, 2007 by Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton is the former Editor-in-Chief at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter or connect via Linkedin or Google+

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