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More evidence of irregularities in the registration of .eu domain names has been uncovered in a study by internet monitoring group Ipwalk.

The research, which comes after the suspension of over 70,000 names by the .eu watchdog, shows a "very high" number of registrations in certain countries with smaller populations and lower internet uptake.

According to Ipwalk, Malta, Luxembourg, Gibraltar, Cyprus and Holland have the most .eu domain names per citizen.

Malta has almost twice as many .eu domain names per citizen as second-placed Luxembourg; more than five times as many as Germany; and almost seven times as many as the UK.

The island also has more than four times as many .eu registrations as those of generic top-level domain names such as .com and .net, although .eu domain names have been available for less time.

The study follows an announcement by EURid, the body which manages the .eu top-level domain, that it had suspended 74,000 domain names which it said had been warehoused by companies. According to Ipwalk, this took place through fronts located in Cyprus.

"An unusually large number of .eu domain names per citizen could indicate that other fronts for registration abuse, just like the Cypriot companies mentioned by EURid, operate in these countries," the group said.

Ipwalk first highlighted the issue of warehousing in April when it reported that a total of 1.6 million .eu domain names had been registered.

Despite Cyprus' population of 800,000, the group said the island had more registered domain names than France. After EURid's announcement, Ipwalk said the number of .eu registrations in Cyprus had fallen from from 85,000 to 12,300.

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Published 3 August, 2006 by Richard Maven

529 more posts from this author

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Robert Andrews, Journalist & Publisher at N/A

I think this one, as they say, could run and run.

about 10 years ago

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