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The majority of people who downloaded Radiohead's latest album In Rainbows decided not to pay for the download, according to figures from comScore.

The band had been praised by many for its decision to bypass the record companies and allow fans to pay as much or as little as the liked to download the the album via its site.

Initial reports suggested that a higher proportion of users had chosen to pay for the album - a survey of 5000 downloaders by Record of the Day found that just 28% decided not to shell out a penny, while the average price paid was £3.88.

If comScore's figures are to be believed, there are more freeloaders than that, with 62% deciding not to pay anything. That figure was also marginally higher (64%) for non-US web users.

The average amount paid for the download (excluding free downloads) was $6 (£2.87) worldwide, with US users more generous, paying an average of $8.05 (£3.86).

Related stories:
Amazon launches music download site in beta
'Not guilty', says Apple on music DRM

Graham Charlton

Published 6 November, 2007 by Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton is the former Editor-in-Chief at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter or connect via Linkedin or Google+

2565 more posts from this author

Comments (1)


Rishi Rawat

I still think Radiohead ended up making more money this way. Do you have any insight into how much revenue was actually generated? I do know for the launch month the site received 1.2 million visits.


almost 9 years ago

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