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Google has extended its recently-launched video ad network to the UK in a further attempt to monetise content from YouTube.

The online ad giant says the service is now being offered to its Adsense partners in the UK, Ireland and Canada – enabling them to display ad-supported clips on their sites.

The ‘video units’ were launched in the US in October, with publishers being offered a cut of CPC or CPM deals.

The official Adsense blog says:

“With this new launch, publishers in the UK, Ireland and Canada will be able to show videos from our YouTube content partners and choose those videos by category, individual YouTube partner, or have video automatically targeted to their site.

“Based on publisher feedback, we've also just added a feature which lets you choose individual videos played in your video units.”

The post adds that the service has been a “success” in the US, but doesn’t provide any figures on uptake.

Related research:
Online Ad Networks Buyer's Guide

Related stories:
One in ten will pay to remove YouTube ads
InSkin Media’s ‘unobtrusive’ video ad format

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Published 20 November, 2007 by Richard Maven

529 more posts from this author

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