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It was painful to watch, but Shel Israel, host of the Global Neighbourhoods “show,” recently dedicated an "episode" to a social media marketing campaign SeaWorld San Antonio engaged in last year as part of its launch of a new ride, 'Journey to Atlantis'.

Kami Huyse was hired by SeaWorld San Antonio to help market Journey to Atlantis, which was completed ahead of schedule and needed to be opened several weeks early. Huyse turned to social media marketing and:

  • Reached out to rollercoaster enthusiasts and bloggers and invited some of them to the Journey to Atlantis media event held the day prior to the ride’s public launch.
  • Made Journey to Atlantis content available on YouTube, Flickr and other social media websites.
  • Created a micro-site for Journey to Atlantis, which linked to the content on social media websites.
The results of Huyse’s work are touted by Israel and social media proponents like Forrester’s Jeremiah Owyang.

What were the results?

  • The media posted on websites such as YouTube and Flickr was downloaded hundreds of thousands of times in aggregate.
  • According to Fran Stephenson, director of communications for SeaWorld San Antonio, during the launch phase of Journey to Atlantis, amongst the visitors who participated in an exit survey taken prior to leaving the park, the number one answer to “Where did you hear about the ride?” was “On the internet.
  • Stephenson told Israel that “tens of thousands” of visitors came to SeaWorld San Antonio because of the social media marketing campaign. Huyse, in a comment here, claims 200,000.

As I watched Israel’s piece, I couldn’t help but see gaps and faulty logic in the claims being made.

So I decided to deconstruct the campaign based on the available information.

What is a Download Worth?

What are 10,000 “downloads” worth? What are 100,000 “downloads” worth? What are a million “downloads” worth?

I can’t pretend to tell anyone. In looking at SeaWorld San Antonio’s YouTube videos and Flickr group, I don’t see a whole lot of “conversation,” “participation” or “engagement” - certainly not the kind that would lend itself to tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of people picking up and heading over to SeaWorld San Antonio.

Who downloaded the SeaWorld content? How many of those who downloaded it were actually prospective visitors to the park (i.e. living in the area or planning to travel to the area)? How did people find this content and what, if any, action did they take after viewing it?

These, of course, are the types of questions that social media marketers rarely like to answer because they’re hard to answer.

The Survey

During the launch phase of Journey to Atlantis, 47% of the visitors to SeaWorld San Antonio who took a voluntary exit survey before leaving indicated that they first heard about the ride through the internet.

Ostensibly, the vast majority of visitors to SeaWorld San Antonio don’t take this exit survey.

This begs a number of important questions:

  • How many people took the survey during the launch phase? What percentage of total visitors does this represent?
  • Is there any data showing that the sample obtained was representative of all visitors? Obviously, depending on the circumstances and how a survey is conducted, certain groups may be more likely to participate, thus providing a sample that is not representative.
  • Was the social media micro-site the only marketing campaign that took place on the internet? Did SeaWorld, for instance, send an email announcement to its mailing list? Were there other online marketing campaigns? How much coverage did the Journey to Atlantis launch receive from media outlets, such as newspapers, whose coverage was made available online?

The devil is always in the detail and as is typical in the world of social media marketing, the important details are lacking here.

What Drives What?

As SeaWorld’s Stephenson makes clear in her interview with Israel, SeaWorld had no way of knowing whether or not the visitors who learned about Journey to Atlantis via the internet had originally learned about it on SeaWorld’s website or through the Journey to Atlantis social media micro-site.

While Stephenson seems to think that knowing which website drove traffic to the other is irrelevant, it’s actually quite important. If the social media micro-site generated significant attention for SeaWorld and drove traffic to SeaWorld’s  website, it would serve as significant validation that Huyse’s campaign was a success.

If, on the other hand, SeaWorld’s website drove traffic to the social media micro-site, it would demonstrate that the social media micro-site played a minimal role in generating interest and attention - it simply took advantage of traffic SeaWorld already had.

Of course, only SeaWorld has the analytics for the websites, but a look at the historical data from Alexa and Compete seems to provide a reasonable answer:

Click on the images for larger views.

As can be seen, there is no clear correlation between the traffic on the SeaWorld website and the social media micro-site, whose traffic barely registers.

Obviously seaworld.com serves as the website for all SeaWorld parks, but nothing in the Alexa and Compete data indicates that the social media micro-site drove non-negligible traffic to seaworld.com and by itself, the social media micro-site does not seem to have attracted much interest at all.

Discrepancies

In her interview with Israel, when asked how many visitors SeaWorld believes came to the park during the Journey to Atlantis launch phase due to the social media marketing campaign, Stephenson responds “tens of thousands.

Of course, previously she indicated that she had no way of knowing what website visitors who learned about the new ride on the internet learned about it at, so one must question how such a response is even possible.

That said, in response to a question by “Adam Zand” in the FastCompany.tv comments, Huyse states “It was somewhere in the range of 200,000 people over two months.

Which one is it? Tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands?

Other Factors

A May 25, 2007 Dallas Morning News article demonstrates just how challenging it would be to figure out how the social media marketing campaign impacted the Journey to Atlantis launch. It states:

"SeaWorld San Antonio is also expecting a busy year as visitors try out Journey to Atlantis, the park’s first new ride in nearly a decade."

"Dan Decker, the park’s general manager, said attendance growth for SeaWorld has been outpacing that of the industry, and he expects that to continue."

"The park is offering its usual discounts and has seen an increase in customers booking vacation packages or buying season passes on its Web site."

Clearly SeaWorld was anticipating a natural increase in visitors due to the launch of the first new ride in almost ten years - with or without social media marketing.

Obviously, such an event would receive coverage from the local press and would have been publicized to the local community, resulting in more attention and more visitors.

It would be interesting to learn what methodology, if any, was used to estimate what impact marketing campaigns, including the social media marketing campaign, had above and beyond the already-anticipated increases.

The mention of increased bookings of vacation packages and season passes through the website is also worth noting. Even forgetting the fact that there is no indication that the social media micro-site drove significant traffic to SeaWorld's website, it takes little more than logic to conclude that social media likely had nothing to do with the increased bookings.

After all, how many purchases of vacation packages and season passes would one reasonably expect to generate from a few hundred thousand “downloads” of YouTube videos and Flickr photos? The conversion rate would have to be unbelievably staggering.

Finally, as per Huyse’s own post on FastCompany.tv, SeaWorld did run an advertising campaign to promote the launch of Journey to Atlantis so the social media marketing campaign she ran did not operate in a vacuum. Again, it would be interesting to learn what methodology, if any, was used to track the various campaigns SeaWorld ran.

Interestingly, Huyse claims that “in comparing the costs, it was $.22 vs. $1 per impression.” Of course, she makes no mention of ROI. Without one, costs are a moot point.

If it takes 1,000 $1 impressions to acquire a visitor but 10,000 $0.22 impressions to acquire a visitor, $1 impressions are still significantly more cost-effective.

Huyse’s statement looks like it came straight out of Forrester’s playbook: social media marketing is cheap therefore it’s good. My playbook: you usually get what you pay for.

Perspective

According to Busch Entertainment Corp., which owns SeaWorld San Antonio, 23.8 million people visited SeaWorld San Antonio in 2007.

Based on the park’s 2008 schedule, it appears that SeaWorld San Antonio is open nine months out of the year. Assuming that the same was true in 2007, SeaWorld San Antonio averaged just under 2.65 million visitors each month that it was open.

Obviously, there must be some seasonality and one would reasonably expect higher turnout for the Journey to Atlantis launch, but this average will suffice.

If we take Huyse’s claim that 200,000 visitors came to SeaWorld San Antonio over a two month period due to her campaign at face value and we assume that 5.3 million visitors attended during that two month period (2.65 million per month average times two), Huyse’s campaign accounted for 3.77% of all visitors.

Would this have been an acceptable result? Probably.

Conclusion

Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like this is plausible. The following problems exist:

  • Stephenson’s comments seem to indicate that SeaWorld took the results from the park’s exit survey indicating that 47% of those polled learned about Journey to Atlantis via the internet and simply assumed that 47% of all visitors did the same.

    We are not told how many people took the survey and whether the sample was representative. Thus, believing that 47% of all visitors heard about the ride through the internet requires a huge leap of (blind) faith.

  • If we accept Stephenson’s assumption, we still have to deal with the fact that she admitted SeaWorld had no way to determine where on the internet those visitors learned about Journey to Atlantis. Obviously, this means that it’s impossible to determine just how many visitors who learned about the ride via the internet learned about it through the social media marketing campaign.
  • Given the Alexa and Compete data, it seems highly unlikely that the social media micro-site drove significant traffic to SeaWorld’s website. If anything, the data indicates that it is much more likely SeaWorld’s website drove traffic to the social media micro-site.
  • It is highly improbable that hundreds of thousands of “downloads” of Journey to Atlantis videos and photos, mentions from niche bloggers (some of whom received negative comments on their Journey to Atlantis posts) and the traffic received by the social media micro-site could ever generate hundreds of thousands of real visitors to SeaWorld San Antonio over a two month period.

    After all, one would reasonably assume that most of the individuals exposed to the campaign did not live in or near San Antonio, had no plans to travel to San Antonio and did not decide to travel to San Antonio after simply downloading a video or photo or reading a blog post.

  • While reaching out to roller coaster enthusiasts made absolute sense, it is equally improbable that these niche groups have the power to drive hundreds of thousands of visitors to SeaWorld San Antonio.

    For instance, American Coaster Enthusiasts, which Stephenson stated has a “big chapter” in Texas, only has 8,000 members worldwide. Do these “influencers” have enough persuasion to convince 200,000 people - approximately 15% of San Antonio's total population -  to go to SeaWorld San Antonio? You figure it out.

    Assuming that even 1,000 coaster enthusiasts became passionate "ambassadors" for Journey to Atlantis, each one would have had to convince 200 other people to take a trip to SeaWorld San Antonio. If they pulled that off, they should all become Amway salespeople.

    It’s also worth noting that Huyse stated that most of the groups she reached out to indicated that they were not in the area and therefore couldn’t come.

I’d love it if somebody involved with this campaign decided to drop by and fill in the gaping holes that exist in the story presented by Israel. Assuming, of course, that they can be filled in.

In the meantime, I have to question whether those who are touting SeaWorld San Antonio’s social media marketing campaign as a social media marketing success story have lost all ability to think critically.

The numbers clearly don't add up and it shouldn't take a rocket scientist to recognise that.

Drama 2.0

Published 14 April, 2008 by Drama 2.0

237 more posts from this author

Comments (17)

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Linda Margaret

All good observations--measuring the impact of a social media campaign is difficult. What's more, efforts and their effects are industry-specific. I'd be interested to see how a similar campaign would influence concert goers rather than roller-coaster riders.

over 8 years ago

Mark Ralphs

Mark Ralphs, Managing partner at Good Rebels

A very level-headed analysis - I think online marketers' first instinct with these social media case studies is to get light headed and start shouting from the rooftops...

That's not to say that social media is just hype - it clearly does have an impact, but it's important to measure its effectiveness properly before deciding how much importance to put on it.

over 8 years ago

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Robert Niles

Three thoughts:

- The 23.8 million figure you cited is for all of Busch's theme parks worldwide, not just the San Antonio park. I suspect that the San Antonio attendance is about one-tenth that number.

- Also, Alexa traffic data is worthless -- based upon a self-selected sample of people who have installed the Alexa toolbar, something that some anti-virus programs attempt to disable. Quantcast provides better analysis of "long tail" niche sites, but only for ones that have installed its tracking code. Tracking website traffic for all but the top couple thousand sites online remains a headache.

- Finally, I don't think that the only two options for how potential visitors heard about the ride via the Internet were the SeaWorld site and the Atlantis microsite. I suspect that a significant number of individuals heard about the ride via third-party websites, such as mine, which you link. But I would consider visits generated by those sites as resulting from the social media campaign if those sites' coverage of the ride and its opening derived from SeaWorld's outreach. (SeaWorld's outreach certainly led to increased coverage from my website, which attracts about 2.5 million unique visitors a year.)

over 8 years ago

Drama 2.0

Drama 2.0, Chief Connoisseur at The Drama 2.0 Show

Robert: thanks for your comment and the correction on SeaWorld's numbers.

The fact that the 23.8 million figure represents total attendance at all SeaWorld parks and that attendance at the San Antonio park was only a fraction of that makes the notion that the social media marketing campaign drove tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of visitors to the park even more unlikely.

If we take your assumption that attendance in San Antonio is a tenth of the 23.8 million number, Huyse wants us to believe that her campaign drove over 8% of total visits to the park for the year in a six-week period.

Assuming that, all told, her social media campaign received, say, even 5 million total "impressions" across a range of internet properties during the six-week campaign (yours included), we would have to believe that 4% of those "impressions" turned into park visitors. That's preposterous, especially when you consider that the vast majority of those "impressions" reasonably came from people who do not live in San Antonio and had no plans to go to San Antonio. After all, how often does the average Internet user see a cool photo, video or blog post and decide to take a vacation to the location depicted within six weeks?

Regarding Alexa and Compete: they are not perfect, nor are of the other services. However, the fact that the social media micro-site barely registers on either doesn't provide much confidence in the notion that there was a "viral" spread of the site that might add some plausibility to the claims being made.

Further, the purpose of my discussion of the traffic difference between SeaWorld's website and the social media micro-site was to address Fran Stephenson's remarks. You'll notice that I discuss the internet in broader terms elsewhere in my post:

"How much coverage did the Journey to Atlantis launch receive from media outlets, such as newspapers, whose coverage was made available online?"

"Of course, previously she indicated that she had no way of knowing what website visitors who learned about the new ride on the internet learned about it at, so one must question how such a response is even possible."

"If we accept Stephenson’s assumption, we still have to deal with the fact that she admitted SeaWorld had no way to determine where on the internet those visitors learned about Journey to Atlantis. Obviously, this means that it’s impossible to determine just how many visitors who learned about the ride via the internet learned about it through the social media marketing campaign."

"It is highly improbable that hundreds of thousands of “downloads” of Journey to Atlantis videos and photos, mentions from niche bloggers (some of whom received negative comments on their Journey to Atlantis posts) and the traffic received by the social media micro-site could ever generate hundreds of thousands of real visitors to SeaWorld San Antonio over a two month period."

Let me ask you this: do you really believe that this six-week campaign drove tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of new visitors to SeaWorld San Antonio?

over 8 years ago

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Kami Huyse

I am flattered that you have taken the time to pull everything you could find together around our little social media experiment at SeaWorld San Antonio. Truth is that we haven't released a full case study, but it seems it may be time. I will be posting something in the next day or two.

We went forward with the FastCompany TV interview at Shel's request, but there seems to be some misdirection and misunderstanding in this post, not to mention a little bit of "huff and puff." But that aside, I think that it is good to continue to ask the hard questions about these campaigns. Like most marketing and PR results, these things are never easy to quantify, but SeaWorld is measuring their campaigns and evaluating the overall value of continuing to do them.

We measured the project in the same way that SeaWorld generally measures its results (using exit surveys that adhere to generally accepted practices) and the management of the park is very happy with the results.

Two things I will clear up right away is that Fran misspoke in the interview with Shel, which is why I commented on the FastCompany video that we feel about 200,000 came in based on their answers to several questions. The other thing is that the "micro site," as you call it, was the ONLY online promotion of the ride. We thought of it more as a landing page to the main SeaWorld site, and our objective was never to drive traffic to the SW site. More on that challenge later.

I doubt that my case study will contain all the information that you would hope to see as some of the calculations I used are based on proprietary numbers. Also, we didn't necessarily focus on all of the things that you felt were important.

The theme park business is competitive by nature. However, the fact that they were willing to share any of this at all shows SeaWorld's forward-thinking culture. I really appreciate that in a client, and I am sure that you do too.

over 8 years ago

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Kami Huyse

PS I agree with Robert's assessment that most of the traffic would have been driven from third-party websites. We considered Robert's site, and others like his, part of the campaign.

over 8 years ago

Drama 2.0

Drama 2.0, Chief Connoisseur at The Drama 2.0 Show

Kami: there's no misdirection or "huff and puff" in my post and if there is any misunderstanding, it's based on the limited information (some of it conflicting) which has come out. I invited you and the others involved to provide more detail and I'm glad you stopped by. I'm interested in seeing whatever detail that's forthcoming.

I should note that the point of my post was to illustrate that social media marketing campaigns are often difficult to track and that I think the numbers made available so far don't add up.

Whether or not SeaWorld was satisfied with the results is outside of the scope of this discussion and is of little concern to me; that’s an internal matter for them (and you).

In regards to third-party websites, I again point out that I mentioned these and still find it hard to believe that these mostly niche websites contributed to driving 200,000 people to a San Antonio theme park.

Here's an easy test:

1. Let's get a list of all the blogs and third-party websites you consider part of your campaign (or at least the larger ones) and that provided some exposure.

2. We'll try to get rough traffic numbers for each of them and come up with ballpark figures for the audience sizes they realistically could have delivered to your campaign.

3. We'll take the total number of estimated "impressions" for your campaign and make a judgment call as to whether 200,000 visitors seems reasonable based on the conversion rate that would have been required to achieve it.

Again, your campaign almost certainly reached far more people who don't live in/near San Antonio and who had no plans to be there so I'm simply very curious to see how you concluded that 200,000 people - which amounts to about 15% of San Antonio's total population - were driven to go via your campaign.

Over the years I’ve seen online conversion rate data for products and services that are far less expensive and far less demanding (i.e. they don’t necessitate travel) than a trip to a theme park and I simply don’t see any likelihood of your campaign delivering 200,000 visitors unless it reached expontentially more people than I can find any evidence it reached.

I also don't see why "proprietary" data or methodologies are required to present evidence of the numbers you claim. This isn't rocket science.

Of course, I understand that SeaWorld might not want to release certain data for a number of reasons but if that's the case then you can't be entirely surprised that somebody would point out that the numbers look questionable.

over 8 years ago

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Michael Clarke

I'm fascinated by this - great post. One (much smaller) piece of research we did on a small-scale event for students we marketed heavily through Facebook suggested that whilst a proportion of attendees primarily found out about it on FB, the other marketing components were just as important. The answers we got, however, also suggested that the FB (social media) coverage was very influential in making a final decision - it's seldom a single ad (as you well know!) that persuades people to commit.

With regards to SeaWorld, the leap from "Q:How did you find out about this ride" "A:The internet" to "Everyone used our social networking micro-site!" seems tenuous to say the least. When I take the family to a park or something, I google for tourist destination sites and opening times - I don't go trawling on YouTube!

over 8 years ago

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Kami Huyse

Again, we didn't say everyone found out from the micro site, that was stated in this post, not in our public statements. It was the entire campaign that drove the Internet piece, including through people like Robert Niles (see above).

over 8 years ago

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Katie Delahaye Paine

An interesting analysis, but when you attack a measurement program you should at the very least employ some basic research principles which seem to be totally lacking in your analysis. Downloads are in fact a measure of consumer behavior, frequently used in ROI analysis. And, while Huyse didn't provide the full methodology of her survey, I think you have to assume that a survey that is regularly used to assess visitor opinion would have sufficient data points to be projectable.
What bothers me most of all is your insistence in shooting down one of the earliest and best social media measurement programs we've seen. Unlike ridiculous metrics like advertising equivalency that some expert propose http://tinyurl.com/3cfz3t Huyse's analysis is one of the first to actually calcuate the true business benefit of a campaign.

over 8 years ago

Drama 2.0

Drama 2.0, Chief Connoisseur at The Drama 2.0 Show

Katie: sorry, but as has been said, "assumption is the mother of all screwups." I'm not assuming anything and there has been absolutely no clarification on the methodology used to conclude that 200,000 people - equivalent, again, to approximately 15% of the total population of San Antonio - flocked to SeaWorld San Antonio because of Huyse's camapign.

"Downloads are in fact a measure of consumer behavior, frequently used in ROI analysis."

This is asinine. The primary highlight of the Global Neighbourhoods piece is that a social media marketing campaign drove significant visitors to SeaWorld San Antonio and that's what I'm questioning.

I never stated that the "downloads" of SeaWorld San Antonio's promotional content on services like YouTube had NO value. I simply questioned the ability of this content to drive the number of visitors to the park that has been claimed.

If you'd like to provide a plausible explanation for how even 5 million "impressions" from a six-week social media campaign are likely to drive 200,000 people to a theme park in San Antonio, be my guest. I'm still waiting for Huyse's case study that backs it up.

Finally, what bothers me about your claim that Huyse's campaign is one of the "best social media measurement programs we've seen" is the fact that you didn't find it important to disclose that have a personal relationship and appear to be friends with Huyse.

http://digg.com/users/kdpaine/friends/befriended
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a73j5G-KvRI
http://tweeterboard.com/user/kamichat

over 8 years ago

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Kami Huyse

The population of San Antonio has nothing to do with the argument at all. Truth is that the park has visitors that come from all over the state, the country and the world, and the number rivals the population of SA. In this case a good many of them (nearly 40 percent) for the period reported said that they were made aware of Journey to Atlantis from the Internet. The only Internet component was the social media campaign that included direct blogger outreach, YouTube, Veoh, Flickr and the Web site (which was actually envisioned as an extension of the SeaWorld site, but was only housed outside it because of speed and features that were available through WordPress - think of it as a landing page for the main SeaWorld site with some social media savvy). The case study is up. As I said, it most likely won't satisfy you completely, but we were bent on getting some idea of our results and feel this got us most of the way there. Plus our relationships with people like Robert Niles stand as a testament to the manner in which we conducted the blogger outreach.

over 8 years ago

Drama 2.0

Drama 2.0, Chief Connoisseur at The Drama 2.0 Show

Kami: in case it wasn't clear, I was using the population of San Antonio as a reference point to illustrate the enormity of your claim.

I read your case study and as you expected, it doesn't answer all of the questions that I think are necessary to back up your claims.

"The only Internet component was the social media campaign that included direct blogger outreach, YouTube, Veoh, Flickr and the Web site..."

This isn't true. Certainly the main SeaWorld website had information about the ride, and the local newspapers and television stations certainly published/broadcast stories that would be posted on their websites. These count and combined, the main SeaWorld website and the websites of the local newspapers and television stations almost certainly received significantly more traffic than the 50 websites that "linked" to your campaign.

Questions:

1. Did the main SeaWorld website ever direct visitors to the WordPress website you created?

2. Can you provide a list of the 50 websites that "linked" to your campaign? Again, it would probably not be too difficult to look at these websites and gauge (roughly) how many impressions they could have delivered over the course of a six-week period.

Until I see data indicating otherwise, I stand by the following:

1. Even if we assume that your campaign received 10 million "impressions" (which I think is way beyond what it received given the niche nature of the websites which appear to have "linked" to your campaign), it would mean that 2% of the people exposed to your campaign decided to go to SeaWorld San Antonio within a six-week period of time. Not only is this highly unlikely from the standpoint that most of the people exposed to your campaign weren't in the area and weren't planning to take a trip to San Antonio, but it's highly unlikely from the standpoint that this type of conversion ratio far exceeds what would be expected. Just ask anybody who has ever sold anything online.

2. Assuming that those who engaged in the park's exit survey who said that they learned about the ride on the internet learned about it through your campaign is a big assumption as you seem to have excluded the possibilities above. If there was any link from SeaWorld's main website to the WordPress website, there is absolutely no way to claim that your campaign organically drove 200,000 visitors to SeaWorld San Antonio.

None of this is to say that SeaWorld San Antonio didn't feel that it got acceptable value from your campaign. All it says is that I simply don't believe it is plausible you drove 200,000 people to their park.

over 8 years ago

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Web 2.0

It can be said, Social media marketing reconstructed. But it is in real sens? Marketing from socially in the age of web 2.0 is not easy. We can interact people with us, gather them but not sure what will be the result that?

about 8 years ago

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MackCollier

I love reading posts like this where it is so obvious that the author has a clear bias for or against the subject matter. It's always funny to me to see people let their agendas slip out, while thinking they are remaining 'objective' in their reasoning.

At any rate, this particular passage stuck out like a sore thumb:

"For instance, American Coaster Enthusiasts, which Stephenson stated has a “big chapter” in Texas, only has 8,000 members worldwide. Do these “influencers” have enough persuasion to convince 200,000 people - approximately 15% of San Antonio's total population - to go to SeaWorld San Antonio? You figure it out."

From what I understand, Sea World contacted bloggers that are passionate about coasters. Who knew there was a passionate community of blogging coaster evangelists?

But there's a couple of things to keep in mind:

1 - Any blogger that's a coaster evangelist, likely has a very engaged audience. So if these bloggers promote the first new coaster at a major park in a decade, that's going to be HUGE news to these bloggers and their readers. So you need to consider the number of cumulative readers for all the blogs, as well as any links that these bloggers gave the other bloggers and/or Sea World/the micro-site. The exposure could quickly hit the hundreds of thousands, if not more.

2 - You seem to be attempting to claim that the visitors would mainly come from the SA area. Common sense dictates that a person passionate about coasters to the point of blogging about them and/or joining the American Coaster Enthusiasts, is likely going to be more than happy to travel a bit to attend the opening of the first coaster at a park in a decade. I think it would be much more reasonable to consider that the visitors were likely coming from the Southwest United States, not just San Antonio.

Overall, I'll agree that the numbers don't appear to be completely firm in every case. Then again, as you state, it's a challenge to get hard numbers when dealing with social media.

On the flipside, I think your bias here keeps your logic and criticism from being solid as well.

about 8 years ago

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tamir berkman

It seems like the entire discussion is based on the numebr of visotors being 200,000 or less. How about the other results this campaign achieved: conversation with bloggers and audience, engaging in the community, more natural google juice and the most important thing: experimenting in the social space.

Social media isn't a simple solution like a 30 sec ad. Yes, I agree there should be some sort of measurement which should also take into account other achievements like advertising dollars saved, depth of engagment and value over an extended period of time.

Will be interesting to see search results before and after the campaign.

about 8 years ago

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Davies

Hi there! I could have sworn I've been to this site before but after browsing through some of the post I realized it's new
to me. Anyhow, I'm definitely glad I found it and I'll be book-marking and
checking back often!

almost 4 years ago

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