{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

The Daily Mail launched a new beta version of its website last week and is running it alongside the current layout so users can provide feedback.

We've taken a look at how it shapes up....

Daily Mail beta site

Homepage

In common with other recent newspaper redesigns, the new homepage now contains a lot more white space, giving it a much less cluttered feel than the old version.

The masthead has changed to 'MailOnline', and, as with the BBC's recent revamp, a wider page format has been introduced.

The day's top news story is given more prominence above the fold. Users can also navigate through the top news stories in pictures, which are much larger than before.

The right hand column is taken up by celebrity gossip and pictures while, just below the fold, the full day's headlines / most read stories are displayed.

Mail today's headlines

This is a common feature on news websites, though it may be better placed above the fold, as on TimesOnline. The headlines aren't too easy to distinguish from the rest of the site though.

Elsewhere, blogs and user generated comment seems to have been given slightly more prominence than before, with links to the top blog posts of the day, and most commented articles, though users have to scroll right down to the bottom to find this.

One big problem though - the page is very slow to load and scroll through. I had thought my PC was to blame, but it seems plenty of other users of the site are experiencing this problem as well, according to the feedback.

The old version was never the fastest loading of websites, but this seems to be worse so far. Page load speed is important as users can obviously be put off by a slow site.

The Daily Mail seems to want to promote every single article on its homepage, but it would perhaps be better to lose some of the content and pictures to speed things up a bit.

Navigation

The Mail has changed from the left hand navigation of the old site, to a header bar on the new site. There are fewer options too - just six - and, strangely, news isn't one of them.

Scroll over any of the options and a preview of the top story from each is displayed in a drop-down:

Mail Online navigation

This is easier to find, and much simpler to use than the previous navigation -though I think, due to the limited number of options, some users will have to do some hunting around to find what they want.

Perhaps they haven't got round to this, but there don't seem to be any subsections for any of the main navigation options.

For instance, if I want to find cricket news, I can select sport from the homepage, but then the only news available is a couple of articles at the bottom of the page, there doesn't seem to be a dedicated section for any sport.

Conclusion

The new beta Daily Mail site is a definite improvement visually, but there is still a lot of work to be done. Reading through the feedback, it seems that a number of users are annoyed by the slow loading speed of the site, and rightly so.

On top of this, the streamline navigation is confusing, as the lack of separate sections for different sports and news types means that users have to do too much searching around for the articles they want.

The new site is still in beta, but there is a lot of work to do to match the redesigned sites for the Independent, TimesOnline and Guardian.

Related research:
Web Design Best Practice Guide

Related stories:
Why is the Indie's new website strangely familiar? 
The Times unveils £10m website redesign
The Guardian continues its revamp 

Graham Charlton

Published 24 April, 2008 by Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton is the former Editor-in-Chief at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter or connect via Linkedin or Google+

2565 more posts from this author

Comments (0)

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Daily_pulse_signup_wide

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Daily Pulse newsletter. Each weekday, you ll receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.