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The Interactive Advertising Bureau is taking a new look at interactive ad unit standards. Only this time, they're looking for a new constituency to weigh in on the future of online advertising: the creatives.

"We believe we can make interactive advertising far more hospitable to the craft and practice of persuasion by putting creativity front and center in the development of advertising standards," said Randall Rothenberg, IAB president and CEO. "By bringing creative agency leaders into the discussion of the standards, we highlight our industry-wide mission to showcase brands and engaging consumers in meaningful ways."

Championing creative work has been one of the two centerpieces of Rothenberg's tenure at the helm of the IAB (educating legislators on privacy and behavioral issues is the other).

The IAB issued the first Universal Ad Package of four ad standards in 2002. Fourteen additional standard ad units have emerged since then. Units are reviewed annually by a task force that takes IAB member company data into consideration.

The companies serving on this year's Re-Imagining Interactive Advertising task force include:

  • Barbarian Group
    BBDO Worldwide
    Carat Interactive
    CBS Interactive
    Condé Nast Digital
    Disney Interactive Media Group
    Google, Inc.
    Microsoft Advertising
    New York Times Digital
    Ogilvy Interactive
    Time Inc.
    Turner Broadcasting System
    Universal McCann
    Univision Online
Rebecca Lieb

Published 30 April, 2009 by Rebecca Lieb

Rebecca Lieb oversees Econsultancy's North American operations.

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160 more posts from this author

Comments (1)


Jamie Riddell

A new set of standard formats will be welcome, although I hope they keep a lid on the number of different formats. The original reason for setting defined formats was to ensure all publishers, advertisers and designers had an established framework of sizes, reducing the need for random resizes.When the number of approved formats gets too big, it somewhat defeats the purpose.

Collaboration between all parties is always great to see, we are all in this together.

over 7 years ago

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