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While multiple e-tailers are still looking for ways to cash in on Twitter followers, some are already reaping the rewards. Dell made an astonishing announcement yesterday. 

The company's has landed over $2 million in sales since June 2007, half of which were generated over the period of the last 6 months. The second million was driven in by "posting offers and responding to questions on Twitter.com/DellOutlet."

In addition, Dell has stated their Twitter activity is "driving interest in new product as well," and some people who visit Dell's online store through their Twitter account "ultimately decide to purchase a new system." These purchases of new systems amount to another $1 million, making the company's cumulative Twitter-driven sales eclipse $3 million.

At the moment of this post, Dell has over 600,000 followers, and tweets 1-4 times daily. Comparing @DellOutlet to other Twitter accounts, Twitalyzer gives its influence a "score of 39.2 out of 100" (average influence scoring only 26.4 out of 100) and rates this account one that is only "becoming established". More here, and a screenshot below:

Twitalyzer report on DellOutlet

There seems to be a lot of room for growth, and it will certainly be interesting to see how Dell's sales grow as their account becomes more influential.

Geno Prussakov

Published 12 June, 2009 by Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov is the Founder & Chair of Affiliate Management Days conference, Founder & CEO at AM Navigator, author, internationally known speaker, and a contributor to Econsultancy. You can find Geno on Google+

27 more posts from this author

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Jeff Molander

Jeff Molander, CEO at Molander & Associates Inc.

I, personally, find all the Twittermainia to be gratitious... also the Dell-focus to be forced.  If Dell were making announcements about how profitable the Twitter channel is... or how valuable customers coming from this channel are (in comparison to catalog/direct mail, broadcast or other traditional media)... or how the Twitter channel provides incremental revenue or customers... anything like that I'd find it much more worthwhile to take notice of.  Just my humble opinion.

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

Jeff, a thought that the Dell-focused reporting (from Dell) may have been forced did cross my mind too. Mainly due to the fact that it is impossible to verify the stats in any way. I don't know. It'd be good to hear from Dell here. I'll send a tweet to @StefanieAtDell and @DellOutlet right after posting this.

As for the "Twittermainia" being "gratitious", I disgree with you here. I blogged about it back in April talking about using Twitter for affiliate program management (there's some interesting data in the comments section under that post), and I have personally been finding it of great use (for networking and education) ever since I've started being actively involved in microblogging.

What are other people thinking about microblogging? And what has other people's experience been?

over 7 years ago

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Jim Proser

Geno,

I've been following your comments since you were kind enough to suggest that broadcasting for affiliates over twitter was a waste of time - which indeed it was.  I also find the Dell announcement highly suspect. My experience with microblogging so far has been primarily annoyance.  The 80 daily text messages that texters send on average is part of this trend which I find soulless and nearly mindless.  I am down to checking my twitter account once a week and erasing all direct messages from people I don't know.  I've also unfollowed dozens of people who apparently have nothing vital to say.  I believe twitter will be the 8 track tape of web 2.0 and will recede into obscurity in the coming years.

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

Jim,

Thank you for your comment and opinion. I personally think that the key to successful/helpful use of Twitter is in carefully choosing who to follow. Then the tweets you get do not annoy you, but actually help you in many respects.

BTW, where exactly did I suggest "that broadcasting for affiliates over Twitter was a waste of time"? I thought my above-quoted post preached exactly the contrary.

over 7 years ago

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Jeff Molander

Nice to be among skeptics, Jim :)

Thanks for your thoughts, Geno.  To be specific, my point is that I find Twitter to be very much the choice of the moment -- more than the urgent or benefit-laden tool that everyone seems to automatically agree that it is.  I also question the widespread practice of rarely using the word "why" when it comes to using Twitter.  It's an automatic "we should be using it" rather than a series of questions that are asked.  The result are self-appointed gurus that make little if any sense (social media 'experts') among other problems.  More here should anyone be interested http://is.gd/BNxM

As for broadcasting w/ Twitter I'd think that we were all wise enough to not use a 2 way medium like the Internet to conduct one-way broadcasts... right??!!!

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

Jeff,

I agree and disagree with you here.

a) I too greatly dislike the fact how multiple people that haven't known a thing about online marketing just a couple of years ago are now calling themselves "experts" and "gurus" in "social media marketing". Someone posted on Twitter the other day that the easiest way to tell an expert/guru from a non-expert is to see whether he/she calls (him)/(her)self such on the bio page. I agree.

b) I don't think everyone is accepting Twitter (as the-thing-to-do) unanimously. No week passes by without someone seriously questioning its effectiveness, and I think skepticism is good. As long as it's not skepticism for the sake of skepticism. I personally am finding it to be effective for the things that I'm using it for (networking, learning, broadcasting).

c) I am a strong believer in an open communication. I am well aware of the risks involved, but I'm happy to take them. The reward is always greater than the pain. So, two-way streets work for me.

over 7 years ago

Jeff Molander

Jeff Molander, CEO at Molander & Associates Inc.

Hi, Geno...

Thanks for the thoughtful dialogue.  I suspect we mostly agree; however I'm taking count of blogs and articles that seem to believe that revenue production or getting people to your store is ENOUGH for Twitter to be hearlded a success -- to the extent that it drives everyone into a "I must use Twitter too" frenzy.  I simply reject the top-line mentality that many marketers use to make decisions.  LOTS of things "work" (ie. generate a sale) to create "results" (ie. generate a new customer) but in the long run if that customer costs us more than we can afford and/or if the marketing strategy has "hidden costs" that similarly impact *strategic* metrics (those extending beyond the marketing department)... then they need to be factored in.  Nothing has changed with me over the years (with regard to my criticizing affiliate marketing!).

So when I say the news was gratuitous (re: Dell) this is not so much a commenatry on your blog (just to be clear!) or decision to talk it up as it is on what I'm calling Twittermania.

over 7 years ago

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