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Parasitic affiliate behavior has been a long-standing problem. The issue is frequently being raised on affiliate marketing blogs and forums, but not by wider communities of e-marketers.

It should be, because in many instances it affects multiple channels of online marketing, and not the affiliate one only.

We-Care Pop-up Reminder Today I have received an application from an incentive/loyalty publisher to be accepted into an affiliate program I manage on Commission Junction. I have declined it, ticking the 'yes' box in the "Add publisher(s) to automatic decline list?" option. The affiliate declined was We-Care.com.

If more merchants/advertisers did the same, they would've saved themselves a lot of money, and helped straighten out both their marketing metrics, and expenses. The fact of the matter is that hundreds of merchants are currently paying at least twice.

The problem of parasitism in affiliate marketing is not a problem faced by affiliate marketers only. In fact, those that are aware of it, do avoid the parasites and those who are supporting them (by ignoring the issue). It is those that are unaware of them (or of the problem altogether) that are most vulnerable, and must learn about the topic.

In late 2008 a friend and fellow affiliate marketer, Scott Jangro, wrote a post, and shot an excellent video on how parasitic affiliates work, "what they do, and how they interact, and how they interfere with other affiliates," and other online marketing channels. Scott's video is a must-see for every online marketer.

Prior to declining We-Care as an affiliate today, I have run a thorough testing of their plugin to see how it affects traffic originating from different sources of online advertising.

Guess what? The pop-up cannibalizes on every one of the 7 marketing channels that I have tested. If you are involved in any of the following channels, and have such affiliates as We-Care.com in your affiliate program, you want to remove them a.s.a.p. In parenthesis I am listing cases/examples of confirmed pop-ups that I have registered today, and you're most welcome to test things (further) yourself as well.

  1. Affiliate Marketing (confirmed: KMart link on CouponCabin.com, BarnesAndNoble.com link at SunshineRewards.com, PacificPillows.com link at Shopping-Bargains.com)
  2. Organic SEO (confirmed: Crocs.com, Diamond.com, Newegg.com, PetSmart.com, Zappos.com)
  3. Paid Search (confirmed: AbeBooks.com, Apple Store, EntirelyPets.com, TheFlip.com)
  4. Direct Type-in (confirmed: Amazon.com, Blair.com, Ice.com, Expedia.com, OfficeDepot.com)
  5. Comparison Shopping (confirmed: BlueNile.com through Shopzilla.com)
  6. Banner Advertising (confirmed: RadioShack.com ad on USAToday.com)
  7. Twitter Links (confirmed: links posted @DellOutlet, @BareNecessities, @theFinishLine)

If you are partnering with the above-mentioned affiliate/publisher, FreeCause, ShopAtHome, OneCause, or anyone else involved in the same type of behavior, your pocket, online marketing channels, and website are wide open for them to steal what either rightfully belongs to you (organic search, direct type-ins, social media marketing), to someone else (affiliate marketing), or what you've already paid for (paid search, banner ads, comparison shopping engines).

As another fellow affiliate marketer has brilliantly summarized it, "using technology doesn't change the nature of a pickpocket criminal, it only scales its reach."

Check your affiliate program today. You may be having a parasite on board.

Geno Prussakov

Published 1 September, 2009 by Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov is the Founder & Chair of Affiliate Management Days conference, Founder & CEO at AM Navigator, author, internationally known speaker, and a contributor to Econsultancy. You can find Geno on Google+

27 more posts from this author

Comments (38)

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Matt Bailey

This is something that is not as prevalent in the UK as it is in the US at present, however steps have been taken to address this before it becomes such a big talking point over on this side of the pond.

The IAB's Affiliate Council have drawn up, and will shortly release, a set of guidelines covering the use of software applications within the affiliate channel. 

The guidelines cover issues such as:

  • the distribution of these applications
  • unsubscribe and uninstall options
  • automatic redirection and cookie dropping
  • splitting activity so that it is clear whether sales have been driven by the application or via a website
Overall, the aims are to avoid consumer confusion and create a set of standards, which are available to everyone. We are not saying that software applications have no place, simply that they need to be regulated.
The most important facet of this code is that all software applications seeking to work on a merchant's campaign must secure OPT IN from the merchant. This means that if any merchant does wish to enter into a working relationship with a software application provider, they do so with their eyes wide open.
If anyone wishes to see a copy of the UK IAB Affiliate Council Guidelines, please get in touch on matt [dot] bailey [at] i-level [dot] com

over 7 years ago

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Clarke Duncan

This is a US problem, but comes off looking like the UK is in the same boat when it's simply not.

It's a well known fact that a group of Affiliates got together and went around every Network in the UK and demanded that none of them allow Spyware on their networks. It was very hard work (I know as I was heavily involved collecting the evidence against them) to get them all to comply, more so the ones with European or International arms that didn't want the revenue effected from losing these parasites.

over 7 years ago

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Matt Bailey

Clarke,

You are correct in saying that it is not a widespread issue in the UK, yet...

The networks who are part of the IAB's Affiliate Council wished to implement guidelines prior to it becoming a problem, precisely so a group of affiliates having to act once it has become an issue.

There are a number of these companies operating in the UK at present but it hasn't hit the mainstream or had as much impact as the US. The aim of producing these guidelines is to try and ensure that it doesn't, which I think was made clear.

Matt

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

@ Matt: Kudos to IAB for being proactive in tackling such issues. Very much looking forward to seeing the software applications guidelines. Do shoot me an email at geno /at/ amnavigator [dot] com when they are out. I'll also write about it in my blog.

@ Clarke: I am located in the U.S. and covering mostly the U.S. affiliate marketing landscape when writing here at Econsultancy. That is why all of my examples included North American merchants. I certainly did not mean the above post to "come off looking like the UK is in the same boat" as far as the scale of the problem goes... Having said this, as Matt has pointed it, it may not be an issue "yet", but unless there is awareness of the issue on both sides of the Pond, we'll only be more vulnerable to the consequences.

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

Add the following affiliate programs to the list too:

  • AmericaRX.com
  • Altrec.com
  • Artbeads.com
  • Batteries.com
  • Bellacor.com
  • Bidz.com
  • Blockbuster.com,
  • Borders.com
  • Boscovs.com
  • Buy.com
  • Calendars.com
  • Clarins.com
  • DisneyStore.com
  • DrugStore.com
  • eBags.com
  • Golfballs.com
  • HomeDepot.com
  • HSN.com
  • LizClaiborne.com
  • LuggageOnline.com
  • Macys.com
  • Mikasa.com
  • MotorcycleSuperstore.com
  • Netflix.com
  • Novica.com
  • Orvis.com
  • OvernightPrints.com
  • PCMall.com
  • Perfume.com
  • PersonalizationMall.com
  • Pfaltzgraff.com
  • PrintingForLess.com
  • SaksFifthAvenue.com
  • ShoeBuy.com
  • Shutterfly.com
  • Sketchers.com
  • SkyMall.com
  • SmartBargains.com
  • SportsAuthority.com
  • TigerDirect.com
  • TigerGPS.com
  • ToolKing.com
  • ToysRUs.com
  • VitaminShoppe.com
  • Wine.com
  • WorldTraveler.com
  • Yoox.com

[These merchants are to be added to the above-mentioned ones. The list is by no means exhaustive. Do check your own affiliate program]

Diagnosis: infected

Explanation: all get a We-Care.com pop up on direct type-ins /action registered: Sept 1, 2009/

Prescription: terminate the parasite

Important: Some of the above-quoted merchants are running affiliate programs on multiple networks (e.g.: Commission Junction and ShareASale, or CJ and AvantLink). If one of the programs has such a parasite on board (cf: Altrec.com, Calendars.com and Clarins.com as examples), decent affiliates on board of both programs suffer.

over 7 years ago

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Sharon Mostyn

Thanks, Geno, for another insightful article.  It's amazing that this technology can impact so many advertising channels.  Keep up the sleuthing!

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

Thanks, Sharon.

I meant to emphasise (Jangro has pointed this out in his 2008 video) that parasitism in affiliate marketing is a much larger problem than just one industry's (or one marketing channel's) problem. It affects other channels, and even affiliates that the merchant partners with through other affiliate platforms.

over 7 years ago

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sharon page

I have just expired them out of the Altrec program and reported them.

Cheers,

Sharon

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

WTG, Sharon! Termination is the only appropriate way of dealing with parasites.

over 7 years ago

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Kevin Edwards

I think there's a couple of issues here.

The rebate catcher / reminder / toolbar regulations mark a positive step forward in the UK, providing guidelines for legitimate affiliates who are looking to enhance their services.

From a transparency perspective I think it's fair to expect these affiliates to run such activity separately and re-apply for programmes. This will also give merchants added clarity on where their traffic is coming from.

The spyware / adware issue is one that is still very prevalent in the UK despite UK networks all agreeing it is in contravention of their network T&Cs.

Saying we're anti-spyware and actually doing something about it are two different things. I think we all agree this pernicious activity can be tricky to spot so whilst manual intervention is always welcome it is not always watertight.

over 7 years ago

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debunking your silly one-sided argument

Please stop this Neo-Ludite McCarthyism.  That is, stop trumping up anti-technology propaganda for your own PR.

The fact is that adware today is highly desireable to advertisers because it grows sales within an acceptable level of return on marketing spend.  Yes some minor affiliates drop out of some advertisers programs because of adware, but the net sales volumes are still much larger.  Why else does virtually evey rev share advertiser of any significance go for it?  I should add that users of adware love it for the convenience and savings.  The only aruguments I hear from disgruntled affiliates are that the advertisers must be stupid.   I guess both consumers and advertisers should bow down to pissy affiliates who dont have much else to worry about.

Its easy for Brits to take dim views on adware, because after the Russians, Brits are the most cynical people around. Sorry if this potent form of advertising is taking sales away from you. Its a form a Darwinism, and at least the Brits should be able to understand that. 

Do your OPM clients know that they could get vastly more sales if they would allow adware affiliates into their program, or have you only presented them with your narrow self-serving point of view?  If you dont educate them with numbers rather than old videos, I expect other hungry OPM's will.

If Im wrong about any of this, I challenge you to prove it.

over 7 years ago

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Dean

Although I don’t agree with the harshness of "debunking"s argument, I have to agree with its concept.  You’re preaching an obsolete religion, and there is some Darwinism in affiliate marketing.  When consumers moved to search engines, you as marketers incurred the cost of SEO and SEM.  When consumers moved to social media, you hired high school and college students to teach you what it was, and to post pictures and head trends for you.  Now consumers are part of a movement.  They’re activists.  They want dollars to go to cause x for every  $100 they spend.  They want to know that what they’re buying is good for the environment, safe for their children, and that a % of it is being donated to save Gorillas.  I’m not sure if this movement is purely fad, but it’s real.  We have to do what we’ve always done: recognize the pattern, and move with it.  It’s not just Charities using this software.  UPromise has over 1 million users, shopping to raise money for their children’s education.  Their programs are so popular, they’ve even infiltrated the credit card loyalty space.  They raise so much money, many merchants work with them directly, circumventing the big affiliate networks.  While there are measurable costs, as you’ve demonstrated, due to this software, there are immeasurable opportunities.  When I click on the link that you’ve managed to push to second position in Google, and I get a little popup telling me that a percentage is going to go to my cause, or a green light that tells me a percentage is going to my son’s education, I feel the same way I feel when I slip one more dollar under the mattress.  Chances are, I just became a loyal customer - not just someone reeled in by a semi-successful SEO campaign. 

I understand your point.  It’s a good point.  But you certainly don’t have a monopoly on popular opinion.  Open your mind, look at the future, and let merchants decide which religion they’d like to follow.

P.S. this article WAS a great PR move!

over 7 years ago

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Mike Allen

Thanks, Geno, for clearly pointing this parasitic action out. I also appreciate the proof you supplied in the form of a video (linked in your comments) documenting this bad behavior.

over 7 years ago

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Jim Doman

I'm just a beginner with affiliate marketing but Geno's comments and everything else I've read lead me to conclude he's spot on.  Unfortunately, just today I read an endorsement of UPromise on dealseekingmom.com's blog.  It's odd that they choose to endorse UPromise when this parasite has the potential to reduce their own commissions.  I commented on this in dealseekingmom's moderated blog and though I don't expect my comment to be published, perhaps she'll share her thoughts with me via email.  If so, I'll post my comment and her response here.

over 7 years ago

Chuck Hamrick

Chuck Hamrick, Affiliate Manager at AffiliateCrew.com

Geno thanks for advocating an underhanded opportunity that may AM's and OPM's foster so they can make their numbers and bonuses. As a long time advocate against adware and moderator on Parasiteware its an uphill battle educating merchants about the real effects. To compound this the trusted third party networks are actively promoting toolbar affiliates directly to every merchant in the network. We even see networks purchasing toolbar affiliates link OneCause and profiting on both ends. 

If you talk to some of the big name OPM's they will openly tell you that they use every toolbar affiliate they can get their hands on as it adds to their channel. One recently told me that Upromise adds $20k a month in sales and they work diligently to get them into their merchants first thing. So if you don't answer to the people who manage SEO, PPC and email marketing for a merchant then you could care less if toolbar affiliate that use adware cannibalize other channels. That's their problem!

over 7 years ago

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Sarah V Bundy

Thanks for the post Geno, you have great timing. I forwarded this article to one of my merchants to let them know why we can't work with these types of affiliates.

Cheers, Sarah

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

@Mike, @Sarah: Thank you.

@Jim: Looking forward to learning how this develops for you. BTW, you may want to tell the owner of DealSeekingMom.com that the affiliate banner of Gevalia.com that she has on her blog also gets a We-Care pop-up when clicked. So, chances of her getting the commission on end users that have the plugin installed are really slim.

Important observation: Some of the merchants whose affiliate programs We-Care has also joined (e.g.: Overstock.com, Target.com, BuyCostumes.com, TheKnot.com) are not getting the pop-ups. More than likely these advertisers have explicitly prohibited We-Care from doing this.

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

@Chuck: It's funny how your name is not showing here (just "Affiliate Manager at AffiliateCrew.com", but nothing above the membership level/type icon).

Re the fact "Upromise adds $20k a month in sales and they work diligently to get them into their merchants first thing": what they do not understand is that the super affiliates who are anti-parasite, and capable of referring 2x-3x more sales to them every month, will avoid their programs forever. Having a parasite on board always hinders the real affiliate program growth.

Chuck, it looks like We-Care has sneaked into the Pro-Form affiliate program too.

over 7 years ago

Chuck Hamrick

Chuck Hamrick, Affiliate Manager at AffiliateCrew.com

Fixed it! Thanks for the heads-up Geno. We run the original in-house affiliate program for ProFrom but they run the CJ program. Will point their AM to this thread. All my programs are free of parasites. 

over 7 years ago

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debunking your silly one-sided argument

Geno - you call it a personal attack, but when you refer to the adware practice -  which I support -  as stealing, isn’t that a malicious personal attack?  From the outset, your terminology is an insult and a non-starter to thoughtful dialogue among honest people.   You dont leave room to agree to disagree because you slander people like me..Vitriol like “stealing” "Parasiteware" "slime" filth" and sleaze" etc are debasing to everybody. I hear it over and over again in the forums and online discussions.   I'm sick and tired of it, and find it hard to be cordial to those who put it out there.

Lets look at what you call stealing.  Suppose Im an advertiser who chooses to work with an adware affiliate.  Of course, I'm also working with other affiliates.  Everything is known by all parties.  Some of the affiliate’s cookies get overwritten, yes.....but the advertiser is paying the bills.  Who is this affiliate to claim that they've been stolen from? Why is the user’s express intent to have a tool bar any different from a choice they might make to go to another site that overwrites the cookie?  If the whinging affiliate doesn’t like it, they can leave.  Adware isnt the only form of leakage affiliates experience – its all part of the natural order for Christ sakes.

You imply we don’t get your main argument, so let’s examine what you said:

“The problem occurs when some of them [adware affiliates] are interjecting themselves (through the use of adware, toolbars, etc) into the other channels of marketing. Additionally, we have to ask if such behavior really brings value to the advertiser”

First, you mention the affiliate is “injecting themselves”  No they aren’t.  They are providing a useful service that advertisers like and want.  That’s why they partner together.  You are injecting your viewpoint into that relationship. Adware is just a fantastic technology that happens to prevail over older ways of doing things.  That’s the Darwinian part of it, but it’s not the least bit un ethical as you imply.  If so, please explain why it is.   Again, you are free to stay away from it, deploy it yourself, or even find something that overrides it.  Instead you choose to defile it, and our industry along with it.

On the last part where you say , “we have to ask if such behaviour really brings value to the advertiser”  The answer is YES, in most circumstances.  I’ve seen the data, but more importantly have to trust advertisers who through careful analytics each make that decision individually.  Can you please respect their decision, and not insinuate that you, across the board, know what is best for them? Again, they are paying the bill for all of us and they get to decide how to spend their money.  If you look at the client list of some of the loyalty sites in America who use adware, the votes are in.  Virtually every big brand goes with adware.

Your viewpoints are self-serving, which is fine, but when you slander others in your industry, you’re bringing us all down.  It’s done serious damage, because it makes people (who don’t pay as much attention as we do) think our industry is not reputable. Who is the parasite in this instance?

Geno.  Lets try to find some common ground.  I will give you this - Adware is not good for some affiliates because they can lose commission that they most likely would have gotten.  Here is where I’d like you to meet me: 

State here in this forum that adware affiliates are not unethical, and neither are the advertisers who work with them

Run the analysis for each of your clients.  You owe it to them 

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

"Everything is known by all parties"

>> Are you positive of this? I would argue that a wide number of merchants (and affiliates too) are totally unaware of what's really happening.


"They are providing a useful service that advertisers like and want"

>> See Sharon Page's, Altrec.com affiliate program manager, comment above. She terminated the adware affiliate as soon as she found out what's going on. More terminations are yet to come. You may have wanted to state that you are providing "a useful service" for the shoppers. That I won't argue against. In most situations the shopper couldn't care less about who gets the credit.


"Virtually every big brand goes with adware..."

>> False. Walgreens, Overstock, Target, TheKnot (and multiple other big brands) are not having the We-Care ad pop-up on their sites. They must have explicitly forbidden this.


"...when you slander others in your industry, you're bringing us all down"

>> I speak for myself, and post my thoughts, observations, and conclusions. You may not like them. Your problem. The readers can make their own conclusions (based on everything that has been written above), and some of the above comments show me that many agree with what I'm saying.

_______________________

PS: Nowhere in the above writing have I ever implied that "the advertisers who work with" adware affiliates are unethical. Many just lack education. That's exactly the purpose of my original post.

over 7 years ago

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Dean

Geno,

As an aside from these arguments, I'd like to add that I'm not missing your point. You're in fact missing mine.  I said that as shoppers move to new channels (Facebook, search, Twitter, etc), merchants incur the costs of exploiting those new channels.  This form of afiliate marketing (cause-incentive based) is one of those new channels. Charity malls aren't going away, and EACH of them uses one form or another of downloadable software. 
If the cost of going where the shoppers are in this case is having some of your other marketing campaigns become "cannibalized", then that's a price, but it's worth it.  As marketers, we tend to hesitate to exploit a new channel, but just like Facebook, Twitter, etc, this is where the shoppers are.  It's a movement, and if you're not working with it, you're lost.  I've seen this with every channel that's evolved, I practice this, and I teach this.  You're scare tactics (while involuntary, I'm sure), are intimidating merchants into dropping programs. The question is: are they benefiting or hurting themselves?

You'd suit them much better if you focused on the mal-ware that's out there.

Respectfully,
Dean    

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

Dean,

The route from adware to malware is much shorter than it may seem.

over 7 years ago

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Matt Bailey

Looking from the outside in, I can see both sides of this. Geno - whilst I understand what you're saying I think it's very dangerous for you to set yourself up as judge and jury on this matter. Make people aware of the facts but don't go naming names and creating a witch hunt.

The crux of this situation is that there is no definite right and wrong. We can't say that all software applications are completely wrong as the way in which they are used vary so much.

The road we have gone down in the UK is to attempt to make sure that all parties involved understand what is happening and has the choice to do what they wish to do.

The UK regulations are available to view on my blog - http://www.mabailey.co.uk/affiliate-software-applications/

over 7 years ago

Chuck Hamrick

Chuck Hamrick, Affiliate Manager at AffiliateCrew.com

Matt I disagree, for too long this has been brushed under the rug. We head down the path of government regulation of online marketing if companies are allowed to redirect revenue streams to their benefit. There is already noise about the FTC regulating blogs and reviews. This is no different then cookie stuffing by coupon sites or trademark poaching through day parting and geo targeting. Follow the money trail and quit falling for the excuse that if you don't do it someone else will. We need a backbone in this channel or we will all be selling CPM banners. 

over 7 years ago

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Kevin Edwards

As I understand it this has been much more of an issue in the US than in the UK.

The IAB guidelines in the UK are designed to address extensions to existing and well established affiliate businesses; rebate catchers, toolbars and reminders.

The guidelines have been debated at length by a large number of contributors from all areas of the industry and are a positive step forward.

We're not talking about pernicious downloads that divert traffic, cookie stuff or mislead consumers - this is adware territory and has long been frowned upon by the UK industry. Indeed I speak as a representative of a network that has automated spyware and adware detection tools available for all merchants.

over 7 years ago

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dinesh parmar

Hi,

Thanks for sharing information. I have personal experience working on affiliate marketing with troohealthcare.com. I have started it with my part time income now I am earning full time. Your information will surely help me to increase more profit. I just refer my friends from facebook and myspace and wrote articles and blog on health. thats it..thanks once again.

Dinesh Parmar

over 7 years ago

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Adware Awareness

I agree with "debunking your silly one-sided argument" comment about how one-sided and poorly written the original post was.

I happen to know for a fact that several of the adware applications work directly with audience measurement companies to monitor overall customer/merchant shopping behavior. It has been proven in some cases that customers shop more at merchants who participate in online reward program than those that don't. Isn't that what affiliate marketing is all about? To drive more sales for merchants.

over 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

Sorry. No more replies from me to anonymous posters (namely, "debunking your silly one-sided argument", "Dean" and "Adware Awareness"). Everyone else, who has expressed their opinion above, clearly stated their full name and, when appropriate, organization/company they belong to.

about 7 years ago

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Olivier Perrot

In France it's worse !

Some adwares of loyalty publishers do not show any popup. When you type anywebsite.com they automaticly redirect with their affiliate link. These adwares cannibalize all the marketing channels.

If you can read french, see here : http://www.webworkerclub.com/forum/topic,75118,0.html

about 7 years ago

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debunking your silly one-sided argument

Geno,

Nice tactic, deciding not to debate unless you know who the person is.  Thats where everybody with failed arguements go.  It seems this forum understands your findings, but rejects your position that adware is bad for anybody other than publishers who get their cookies overwriten.

Chuck, franky you sound like one of those right wing American whackos, though you seem conflicted by a stong marxist tilt. You said:

"We head down the path of government regulation of online marketing if companies are allowed to redirect revenue streams to their benefit"

Are you honestly scared of governments regulating something like this? Thats some serious gun-clinching paranoia.  The Marxist part is ".....if companies are allowed to redirect revenue to their benefit"  Are you saying companies are not supposed to act for their own benefit?  Come on Geno and Chuck, if you guys are going to get on this forum, lets hear some cogent arugument at least.  By the way Geno, we still are waiting for the analysis that adware is bad for advertisers.

Regarding my anonimity: I thought thats what these forums where for.  It not me who matters, but the ideas that I stand for.  Besides, Im not doing the pandering PR thing.  Truth be told, because of powerful forces in our industry - it could go bad for me if I revealed my identity.  Why dont you just call me the Subcomandante of Sanity.  Then we can talk again.

Truly, to me its about the ideas rather than the person. It seems you feel the reverse?

SOS

about 7 years ago

Geno Prussakov

Geno Prussakov, Founder at AM Navigator LLC

From Zappos.com affiliate program description on Commission Junction: "Zappos.com is the *only* major shoe merchant that DOES NOT ALLOW PARASITES. With NO PARASITES you get the money you have earned!" One clear statement. No wonder why they are neither on We-Care.com's list of merchants.

I have also been informed that the above-quoted parasite has been removed from Artbeads.com and Forzieri.com affiliate programs, and restricted from popping the "reminder" up on Pingo.com.

about 7 years ago

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Affiliate Network

There are so informtive comments here. Thank you very much. I have learnt so much interesting information!

almost 7 years ago

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Pop Up Stands

Can anyone suggest how much traffic a website needs to have before running an affiliate marketing programme would become viable?

almost 7 years ago

Ciprian Gherghescu

Ciprian Gherghescu, Social Media Implementation at http://www.onlinesocialmediaservices.com

i think traffic isn't a factor at all, because in my view you set up the affiliate marketing programme in order to bring traffic to your site,

almost 7 years ago

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Ben

How are they helpful to website visitors? I personally amd opposed to using pop ups on web pages. I know there are arguments for and against, but I feel the old skool web user associates pop up dialog boxes with sp@m like behaviour. The content should sell the product not a pop up.

over 5 years ago

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Laura Black

A pop up is a black stain in the website reputation. People don't like it and associate it to scams and hard sell tactics.

Affiliate marketing is only good for the company who owns it. All the others think they are creating their own business but they aren't. They work for the company at the top of the food chain.

over 5 years ago

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Pagan

I wound up on your site a few weeks back and I just can not get enough!

Please keep writing!

over 4 years ago

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