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SlideShare is a hub for wickedly-awesome slideshows and presentations. And that has made it a popular place for savvy marketers to publish some of their wares.

That's something SlideShare is not unaware of and like any smart startup looking to find new revenue streams, The company is looking to turn popularity with businesses into profits with a new offering called SlideShare Business.

SlideShare Business is designed to help its business users do two things:

  • Reach people who might be interested in the information they're sharing on SlideShare.
  • Generate leads.

With AdShare, businesses can promote their SlideShare content on a pay-per-click (PPC) basis to SlideShare users who are browsing relevant/related content and, optionally, who are geographically located in a particular region. In other words, AdShare is essentially SlideShare's in-house version of AdWords. The minimum cost for clicks starts at 25 cents and ads can contain "brand imagery" (e.g. "a thumbnail image of front slide").

But SlideShare isn't stopping at clicks. It wants to help businesses capture leads. For instance, if you've published a white paper for your product, SlideShare wants to make it easy for a reader to express interest. That's where LeadShare comes in. When enabled on a SlideShare document, LeadShare displays a form that can capture contact and other information specified by the business. Leads can be sought from users in specific geographic regions and the cost per lead starts at $1.

Both AdShare and LeadShare seem like no-brainers for SlideShare. And they just might make sense for a lot of SlideShare's business users. After all, the opportunity to tap into SlideShare's audience is appealing. And so is the opportunity to capture leads on-site without having to drive traffic to your own website.

It's a trend we're seeing more of: you don't necessarily need to drive traffic to your own website. You can deal direct where the users are. More companies are building robust presences on Facebook, for instance, and they're using Facebook's self-serve ad platform to drive traffic to their Facebook pages and applications instead of their own websites. If SlideShare can create a similar dynamic, albeit on a much more niche level, it might have a winner on its hands.

Patricio Robles

Published 7 October, 2009 by Patricio Robles

Patricio Robles is a tech reporter at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter.

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Comments (1)

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Tenders

Where are the main platforms of ads focused on? Facebook and what else?

almost 7 years ago

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