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Fashion retailer Whistles relaunched its website last week, and the resulting Flash heavy site is certainly different.

According to Whistles' Jane Sheperdson, 'We spent a lot of time researching best practice online. We then threw out everything we had learned, and just designed something that pleased us visually.'

This is an interesting way to approach the design of an e-commerce site, but what will the result be for the user experience?

Homepage

The review on Grazia describes the Flash homepage quite well; it's effectively the size of a 'large plasma tv which extends out beyond the edge of your monitor', and by moving the cursor to the edges of the screen, you can move around the page.

The page contains several product images, as well as two or three videos randomly dotted about the page:

Whistles homepage

Getting the damn thing to stop moving can be a challenge at first, as the only place you can put your cursor and not move the page is an area around the centre of the page.

It moves pretty quickly too, which can mean that, as soon as you have found something you want to look at, it's gone again. Or find a dress, and move to the area where the link to the product info is, and you will find the whole screen moving with you.

Essentially, while you can figure it out with some practice, it shouldn't be this hard to use, and there is no alternative method of moving around the page.

Each product photo has a link on it which will take you to the product page when you click. Again this is something for users to figure out, especially since the cursor doesn't change when you hover over a link:

The videos play in full screen, and will hit you with sound if you choose to play one, and there are no volume or mute controls to alter this. There are also no other options to forward, pause etc on videos. I also found the videos slow to load and play:

Navigation

There is a navigation bar along the top of the page so you can shop by collection, brand, or choose from product categories, while a search option is provided too, but you need to click another link before you can enter a search term. 

Select shop, for instance, and you end up on this page:

You can scroll up and down and click on one of the photos, or else on the category to view all items. After this, there are no further filters or navigation options.

In the case of the dresses page, for example, there are 69 relatively small pictures of dresses to look through, and to see a bigger photo or find details on price and size availability, you have to click on an item.

This makes for a lot of work on the part of the shopper and could become an annoyance. Showing product details when customers mouse over images, or providing filtering options would make browsing far easier.

Product pages

There aren't separate product pages on the site, instead they pop up when you click on product photos:

All the required information on product information and availability is provided, and good quality, zoomable product photos are available, though the link back to the product details from the zoomed in photo is unclear: 

Also, some the text is very small, especially on the size chart and delivery details, meaning some users may strain their eyes attempting to read these details. 

Checkout process

The shopping basket page does the basics, total price and delivery charges and summary of contents, but provides no information on payment methods or any reassurances about server security.

Users need to register before entering the checkout process, or else login if they have already registered. As we have covered in other posts, compulsory registration can be a barrier to purchase, and some retailers have experience increased conversions by removing registration.

Also, the checkout process, though it is relatively sparse, has not been enclosed, so clicking on any if the links on the top menu will take shoppers out of the process.

Forms were easy enough to fill in, but in the case of errors, users have to re-enter all of the details they have entered.

In the example below, having completed all but one field on the payment form and clicked to continue, all my previous entry has been deleted, meaning I have to start again:

Also, by deleting everything entered, users may be unable to pinpoint the area where a mistake has been made, meaning that the same error may well be repeated.

Conclusion

The new Whistles site looks good, and is certainly different, but I think in several areas this comes at the cost of providing a decent user experience.

Retailers and web designers shouldn't necessarily blindly follow all best practice guidelines, but I do think that the end user should be taken into account. In the case of this site, by ignoring best practice and just designing a site that pleases visually, it has made it harder for shoppers to use the site.

There are other issues I haven't explored fully, including the accessibility of the site, and the SEO effects of having so much Flash on there.

Perhaps this approach works for this particular website's userbase. After all, sales increased fourfold on the first day after relaunch, though the hype around the launch may account for this.

Whatever the reason for this increase, I wouldn't recommend this kind of approach for e-commerce sites that want to appeal to as broad an audience as possible, as there are too many elements here that could annoy web shoppers.

Graham Charlton

Published 10 November, 2009 by Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton is the former Editor-in-Chief at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter or connect via Linkedin or Google+

2565 more posts from this author

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Peter

'We spent a lot of time researching best practice online. We then threw out everything we had learned, and just designed something that pleased us visually.'

A very interesting approach to user experience!?

Personally I can't stand flash websites (like this) but as you mention this might be the right way for whistles and their customer base; however I seriously doubt it.

It would be interesting to see some figures from last year and the number for this coming christmas which is looking promising for online retail. A follow up report in 6 months time would be very educational.

almost 7 years ago

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N Walker

With respect gentlemen, the site is not for the likes of you! It may trouble your egos to learn that women engage altogether differently to men online. It may have been useful to canvas their opinion ahead of your predictable quasi authoritative commentary.

almost 7 years ago

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Malcolm Coles, Director at Digital Sparkle

N Walker - that is a fair point for some issues on the site. But it falls down on some basic usability points that are going to affect everyone. It's not clear how to navigate, what buttons do, where to click, where screen space for one link ends and another one starts ...

almost 7 years ago

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K.Gelbe

Product looks great — site is easy to use, and I can use all form fields on my new iphone (hint). Maybe unusual, but cool browsing and makes you want to look. What's not to like? No blue underlines? 

almost 7 years ago

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Michael Batey

The best I can say is, it's not as bad as I was expecting from the review.

It's a shame that so many minor usability issues have been allowed to survive to the final version: many of them could have been fixed without compromising the 'vision' of the site.

And a few tooltips on the buttons wouldn't have gone amiss. Designers need to realise that the meaning of an icon is not necessarily obvious to people.

Finally, I'm still hyperventilating from the arrogance of 'We then threw out everything we had learned, and just designed something that pleased us visually.' You're not Picasso! Just do it properly, and customers will come flocking.

almost 7 years ago

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Paul Wright

Just picking up on N Walker's point, is it correct that women arn't interested in price then? The only way you can see the cost of an item is by directly clicking on it.

There is also a major issue that when you click on the item, and the product pops up with the details. If you click on one of the links - size guide, delivery or returns, how do you then get back to the product you've just looked at?

I must admit, the site does look nice, and i can see the visual appeal, but have they really tested the site and asked the most important people what they think of it, the user. Ive only been on it for 5 minutes and it's clear to see the basic flaws.

Isn't an ecommerce website supposed to be a great place to cross sell products also?

I don't think asos.com will have to worry about this website at all.

almost 7 years ago

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Leo Allen

N. Walker, I think it's patronising to women to say that universal usability principles don't apply to them. Are you saying that a slow scrolling, unclear site with pointless flash, bad layouts, too-small text, unclear layout, and poor form validation are issues somehow made irrelevant by gender?

almost 7 years ago

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DJ

This site is awful. The basic principles of usability are ignored. The user has not at any point been considered.

As Paul Wright said, the site looks nice but is has MAJOR usability flaws.

I would employ somebody who actually knows what they are doing with designing websites. And as for the ridiculous statement:

'We then threw out everything we had learned, and just designed something that pleased us visually.'

What is wrong with you? Maybe you're the type of person who would design a car, then decide to take out the steering wheel and seats so that it's more visually pleasing. And while you're at it, get the Flash guy in there to see if he can cover the windscreen in some animated graphics.

Please get it sorted.

almost 7 years ago

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Leif Kendall

We spent a lot of time researching best practice online. We then threw out everything we had learned, and just designed something that pleased us visually.

Very brave - throwing out everything that you've learned from others. Good luck to them!

almost 7 years ago

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stas pruglo

i like it - it works. maybe not brilliantly, but works so what if you cant see the price until you see more details - its a not an Argos catalog. User is not choosing the cheapest most functional kettle at the best price. the potential buyer is choosing a dress, on the merit of the looks. Its actually quiet smart. Their are no 2 prices next to each other. The user isn't going to be comparing the them ad then deciding which is a better value. In other words you are making it less likely that the user will go on to bargain hunting and more likely to just by the pretty one. Intentionally or not they have hit on something smart.... my guess it intentionally. yes this site could look alot beater, and there are some issues with the mechanics of click and hover. and as for those who are still hyperventilating while writing their posts - maybe you should slow down on that coffy.

almost 7 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

The navigation is very brave, yes, and they should be appluaded for trying to innovate.

HOWEVER, the process of actually buying something is a mess, the checkout is a shambles and one of the "rules they've thrown out" seems to be the need for a site to sell stuff.

Whoever signed off on this project should be shot before they can strike again.

almost 7 years ago

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Diane Parker

This site is marvellous and a refreshing change from the cattle grid e-commerce schemes that currently proliferate. I would suspect that those who take issue with it and perceive as arrogance the abandoning of widely held e-commerce principles, have garnered there experience developing for corporate Goliath's selling toilet rolls and alike? The site is clearly aimed at the discerning 'female' customer and not the pile 'em high sell it cheap asos bargain hunters! The majority of customers are not going to arrive at the site by accident and subjective usability stumbles (should they encounter them, I didn't) will probably not deter them from perservering to complete their purchase. Unlike most men who require a site to rigidly marshal them (which out distraction) through the payflow process of buying a pair of y-fronts! The site is experiential and entirely on brand. Yes, it may benefit from some tweeking and this will no doubt happen as feedback filters in but the site in my view, clearly demonstrates that they understand their brand and who their customer is. They have obviously focused on developing an online dialogue with said audience, rather than adopting the firmiliar risk averse spread bet approach. As a woman, I do not find NWalker points in the least bit patronising (they are a relief) and it's depressingly unsurprising that all comments thus far have been from men. Rather supports his suggestion...

almost 7 years ago

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N Walker

Your comment illustrates my point beautifully Mr Lomax and I quote "canvassed opinion is irrelevant". This, one would assume includes yours?!. Piles of ego fuelled hubris and an inability to let go of the proverbial best practice hand rails distinguish your commentary. There are an awful lot of presumptions in your critique and your wanton disregard for the opinions of others colours your judgement and is frankly a little worrying. What leads you assume that the site has not been multivariate tested? Were you consulted during the development process? I would suggest that it is highly likely the professionals who PM'd and developed the site put it through pre-launch testing and are continuing to evaluate its performance. Personally, I find your analogies a distraction, bizarre and poorly chosen. "A car is usable but not very learnable?!" Well, that's a matter of opinion I guess and we've already established that you don't place a great deal of credence in asking people their views. I think it's a little premature to make definitive statements such as "it doesn't sell clothes" I think you should let Whistles customers decide and maybe ask them after the site has been live long enough to establish a frame of reference. Just a thought.

almost 7 years ago

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Paul Lomax, Chief Technical Officer (CTO) at Dennis Publishing

@N Walker: 

Since you're already accusing me of having 'ego fueled hubris', I have no concerns about stating that mine is not a canvassed opinion, it's one based on over ten years of observation, study and experience. I assume you'll call that arrogance. Personally I find 'We then threw out everything we had learned' more arrogant.

However, I wouldn't presume my opinion is correct, I would seek to test it. But what experience provides me with knowledge of a number of concepts that have already been tested.  I've witnessed first-hand many hours

I was merely pointing out that asking people 'do you like this website' is completely pointless and actually reinforces my original point - that the site is 'pitch winning' because in snack form is bloody brilliant but may have issues under longer term scrutiny if you actually try and BUY from it...

Some of the issues raised in the review (which wasn't my review I might add!) are very valid and I've seen them tried (or rather seen them ignored) before in favour of 'shiny things'. And I've seen the results - sales - prove there was a problem or a better solution.

To answer your question why I presumed the site had not been through usability or multivariate testing - because Jane Shepardson said it hadn't!

We spent a lot of time researching best practice online. We then threw out everything we had learned, and just designed something that pleased us visually

Am I to assume you were involved in the project and are offended by the criticism? Otherwise I don't understand why you appear to be so upset.

almost 7 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

It's pretty clear that this site hasn't gone through any form of usability or multivariate testing. I worry that the site concept was put together by the wrong team, with too much effort put onto merchandising, and not enough onto user experience or interaction design.

The argument that “this site was built for women, and you digital men types just don’t get it” is nonsense. The flaws with this site are basic usability fundamentals, and that they have been overlooked in favour of visual flair is the height of arrogance.

My basic criticisms are:

1)    The use of Flash for this is incredibly lazy.  If a truly innovative interface was being built, it should have been done in standards – the whole experience could have been recreated in jQuery, whilst remaining accessible, and allowing product links, which brings me to:
2)    Because it’s been so badly built, nothing can be linked to. How can “Whistles Woman” email her friends with a “do you like this dress?” message? If you want to see what can be done with deep product linking in Flash – Louis Vuitton does a good job.
3)    I’m forced to browse at the rate set my Whistles – there does seem to be an element of acceleration in the scrolling, however it still crawls. A better solution would have to augmented this with hold-drag functionality, are more people are accustomed to this.
4)    There’s lot of elements where the css work is shoddy, for example, click the whistles logo, and a blue box appears around it, misaligned with the grey background, as it hasn’t been styled properly. Things like this are all around the site.
5)    The purpose of this navigation, I assume is to encourage exploration, and see a variety of looks. However, no effort is made to sell these as looks, there’s not even any cross-sell attempted.
6)    The lack of product linking causes more problems. I find a coat I want to buy, I click on the plus, I get a detail overlay, I then want to look at the sizing information, I hover over, then click as I want to find out more detail. The moment I do this, the experience breaks, and when I go back, I’m NOT taken back to the item I was interested in.
7)    Once I do add it to my basket, there’s only one small message acting as a clue this has happened.
8)    Once I enter my basket, once again, I can’t go back to where I was to continue shopping, for example if I’ve realized I’ve added the wrong size, which will happen a lot as the size was autoselected (apparently at random) for me.
9)    At the “business end” of the site, the design is flawed. I count at least 5 fonts alone on the basket page alone. The main information font appears to be Courier (although looking at the code it looks like a font called Gravur Condensed Light gets downloaded, really), but has been dialed back to a shade of grey that is barely visible.
10)   As Graham has pointed out, checkout form fields aren’t held following an error message, and the site requires registration to place your order.
11)   The biggest annoyance, is for al the visual flair in the merchandising side of the site, the checkout process is, well, incredibly boring. It’s like they either gave up halfway through or simply lost interest. This is an actual insult to me, checkouts can be beautiful, engaging, works of art, look at Graze.com for example, it’s stunning. For all of Diane’s protestations that women don’t want procedural shopping, Whistles have the checkout the dullest thing I’ve seen for a long time.

I really think, that Jane has made a huge mistake, the conversion rate of this site must be abysmal, and it's conversion rate that matters in this game, not a (frankly, confused) visual style,"vertical brand engagement cohesiveness" or whatever buzzword was used in the pitch for this, or outlandish navigational tricks.

Finally, look at the source code of some of the pages, it’s hysterical, elements are still marked as “todo” or named “other thing”. Unordered list items are then given numbers in the content. – it’s My First Website type stuff. Though it is nice that they’ve spent all this money, yet still use Google Analytics.

Sigh. That stuff like this is allowed to be launched, a couple of days before World Usability Day , must be some elaborate practical joke.

Matt (who wishes Whilstles had spoken to him first)

almost 7 years ago

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N Walker

I've no professional involvement with the company or the project Mr Lomax, I simply disagree with your position as it promotes a narrow view. In essence you appear to believe that years of observation and experience afford you the platform to make flash unqualified judgements. Like you Jane Shepherdson is an experienced professional in her field. Yet her learning's notwithstanding she has pragmatical overseen the build and development of an undeniably innovative and elegant site. How you arrive at the idea based on one sound bite that she has achieved this by unilaterally riding roughshod over 'every' accepted best practice principle is woefully naive. I interpret the quote to mean visually, the development team were directed to dispense with the rule book but I very much doubt that this directive included instructions to do so at the expense of functionality and usability. That would not have been particularly astute business sense from an executive with a demonstrably successful track record in retailing. I'm more than happy to wager that the site will be a commercial success. See you in six months!

almost 7 years ago

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John Henry

Matt, I don't want to enter my post code I just want to order a luxury chicken & leek pie! Whose usability brainwave was that?! Also where is your blog and why can't I send to a friend or join the Facebook group! Very sloppy!

almost 7 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

Sigh. If you're going to criticise, then don't do it anonymously. I get the feeling there's a bunch of Whistles/Bureau/Fresca sockpuppets on here. Alhough, the choice of `John Henry" as a sockpuppet name is inspired. Well done there. WFF is a franchise business. We encourage entreprenurialship in our franchise network, to the point where they have control over pricing and product stock. This business model isn't condusive to ecommerce, so we've had to work around it, and in places, encourage it. This is discussed here: http://boagworld.com/usability/case-study-wiltshire-farm-foods . I think we've come up with a very elegant solution to an issue where most designers would throw their toys out of the pram. We haven't had a "blog" for a long time, in any case we called it a Journal, as it was a lot more audience appropriate. You can send to a friend here: http://www.wiltshirefarmfoods.com/send_friend.asp - not the best form ever, and something I need to work on, but WFF isn't being reviewed here. You can join our Facebook group http://www.facebook.com/pages/Wiltshire-Farm-Foods/7089834065 any time you like. Though we do turn away pedants.

almost 7 years ago

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Gavin Wilkinson

As a BT Fresca person (although not a sock puppet; love this comment!!) I can reassure people that usability feedback (including this thread) will be taken on board, and the site will evolve and improve.

Sure, the site is not perfect (yet), but it's bold and brave, articulates the brand brilliantly, and is receiving really great feedback from the Whistles audience. And yes, it sells.

almost 7 years ago

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Malcolm Coles, Director at Digital Sparkle

Gavin - do you know how the sales figures are going? This is the acid test, regardless of our views on usability.

So: there was a 4-fold increase on day one, but driven partly by free P&P and a free gift I understand. How do sales compare when these offers expired to, say, the week before the site went live?

Obviously, we're getting near Xmas so week-on-week comparisons will be tricky. And you probably can't share commercially sensitive data. But is there anything you can share?

N Walker - you really are coming across like someone with a stake in this site ... Some aspects of the design are at the stake of usability - like I can't work out what the buttons do without clicking them ..

almost 7 years ago

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Paul Lomax, Chief Technical Officer (CTO) at Dennis Publishing

@N Walker - I'll take that wager ;-)

Jane Shepherdson is indeed an expert in her field - and her field is high street retail, not e-commerce.

People who know their business and their customers in the 'real world' often make the fundamental mistake that those customers will behave the same in the web space - or even that they're the same people. I've probably (literally) had the debate with over a hundred people. Behaviour is all about context and people do not shop online the same way as the shop in store, yet so many brands obsess about 'recreating the store experience'. More fool them. 

Successful online brands (eg myDeco and Net a Porter mentioned above) focus on quality e-commerce, conversion funnels, user experience - but can still do that in a visually attractive way.

@Gavin - I've been in your shoes as a platform provider / integrator who has a design forced upon them. It can sometimes be frustrating when you know you know better :)

The design agency in question are no doubt talented at graphic design but I do doubt their e-commerce credentials. I can imagine that BT Fresca would have been trying to push back on a number of points but the client wanted to throw out the rule book. 

almost 7 years ago

Zoe de Pass

Zoe de Pass, Insights & Creative Strategy at Spring

I love the Whistles site! - and I am very much part of their target audience - coincidentally i am dressed head to toe in Whistles today!

Its different from standard fashion ecommerce sites – there is an experience involved and a feeling of luxury that you don’t get from an average brash ecommerce site such as asos. I stayed longer, found everything I wanted– had no trouble finding sizes, info etc. It is fun to use and looks impressive – and the girls will love it!  

I can see there are a few things that need to be ironed out but at least its different – I’ll be going back! :-)

almost 7 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

But zoe, the problems are a little more weighty than "a few things that need to be ironed out". That no interaction goes into your history, fundamentally breaking forwad/back navigation, and as an offshoot of the poor design, products don't have direct links, is just, absurd.

You can really tell that this design came from a print agency, no thought to interaction has been given at all. "Throwing out the rule book" is just their way of saying " we have to clue how to design websites, so we'll design one big page, and call it groundbreaking"

It's pretty clear that bureau va only gave thought to the frontend, because the checkout is dull dull dull.  It does nothing to cross sell, doesn't fight dissonance or reassure the user in any way. Maybe women prefer a boring checkout experience?

I've had 3 women try the site out for me, and I haven't had one good bit of feedback. One of them said it was like trying to shop through treacle. Although, I think the "women shop different from men" thing tosh How do I, as a gay man, shop? It's utter nonsense.

almost 7 years ago

Chris Hoskin

Chris Hoskin, Chief Marketing Officer at Innoverne Limited

I just wanted to post to say 'I was here!', 'cos this one might roll and roll!

IMHO the site is beautiful. It's a bit different. Moving towards edgy (its not that way out to be honest though).  And certainly thought provoking if you are an eCommerce connoisseur.

But so what?  

My wife hates it, and she is (was?) a Whistles advocate.  Every person I have spoken to in a non-random, non-scientific way isn't 'that' keen either.  Coincidence?  Possibly.  But comments like its "annoying to use" and "frustrating" are not good when the site is so inflexible anyway.   

If I was to state a personal opinion, it would be this:

> It won't sell as many clothes as a brand like Whistles could.  And; 
> It won't sell as many clothes as a brand like Whistles should.

And that's a travesty for a British brand right now.  

I am sure we will hear about % increases in sales + loyalty increases etc. But that's all relative, as is my opinion.  

So I canvassed our design team's collective opinion.  I'll copy and paste it in a separate post below.

almost 7 years ago

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N Walker

Guys it has clearly not been developed with you in mind and I realise that being dismissed in such an explicit manner is obviously upsetting. Get over it! Don't feel undermined however, your positions and status are safe as there are more than enough banal sites in existence or in the works to provide you with the opportunity to put your years to experience to billable use. Your still relevant to those who lack belief and can't make a decision without metrics. You're on Mr Lomax see you in 6 months ;-), where do you shop incidentally? @ Matt the salient points to take from Zoe's comment Matt are "I love it, I'm in the target audience and I'll be back" you can't force her to hate it because you have issues with the source code! Whistles clearly isn't for everyone and this will no doubt include some gay men. What you appear to be saying is that it's nonsense to make assumptions about a specific demographic, which would seem to run contrary to what a great deal of your job requires you to do. Your multivariate test and then use the data to determine who is buying your meals and how they like to buy them. These meals wont be for everyone but it's probably safe to assume that there will be some gay men in the mix. Presumably, if they don't form a significant number you'll ignore their specific shopping requirements and concentrate on your core customer. I don't think Whistles much care how you shop as a gay man on their site because they aren't designing for you or Mr Lomax they are engaging with Zoe and alike but you can tell me if it helps.

almost 7 years ago

Chris Hoskin

Chris Hoskin, Chief Marketing Officer at Innoverne Limited

This is what our Head of Design Andrew Jones had to say + his colleagues feedback;

New adventures are always exciting…….

When you explore new things on the web you are not always taking notes of the standards things, you are simply enjoying the journey. 

On the first visit to whistles.co.uk I explored and gazed in wonder at components like the homepage and the beautifully non-cluttered product listing pages. The photography and products look exquisite and the lack of the usual ecommerce design patterns were at first glance refreshing…..

However then I stood back, put on my usability cap and asked a few colleagues (mainly female) to view the site and a few things became very evident, whilst the experience was different it needed in my opinion a few tweaks:

Homepage:

• No overall sense of where you are on the large canvas style image. I was always left with the thought ‘what did I just look at?’ – there was no reference point, no place to go back to or no scale of what have I and what haven’t I seen..

Collections > 

• I didn’t notice the white arrow boxes on the thin grey line to explore the horizontal collection I used the images at the bottom….why no add a thin border to make these stand out slightly more

• I want to filter, I want to refine, basically I want to choose on more things than just look

• How many items are there, do they have names, this may not matter if I buy today but what about if I want to visit a shop or what about if I want to think about it

Header

• People will visit this site for different reasons, for different journeys…if I want something other than to browse or shop online should these ‘additional’ links not be style in a different way

• Can I search the site? Apparently yes, first find the search link amongst the account links (account and login) – click it and goto a new very minimalist page. With (depending upon who you believe) anywhere between 40% and 60% of site visitors heading straight for search why not make it easy?

In summary I like this site it has a nice ‘feel’ but that doesn’t necessary equal sales. If it was my site I would want people thinking about the ‘products’, ‘the outfits’, ‘where is my credit card because I want that’ rather than ‘where am I’, ‘how do I get back to that page’ or ‘where is the search box’….

almost 7 years ago

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Paul Lomax, Chief Technical Officer (CTO) at Dennis Publishing

@N Walker Something doesn't need to be developed with us in mind for us to be able to spot serious usability issues based on a) our experience of how people who ARE the target use the web and b) based on the fact that whilst the target market might be different, they also share a large number of traits and habits with most other internet users. Zoe is welcome to love it and I'm not trying to convince her otherwise, but I think it purely a 'first glance' opinion and I would be interested to see how she found it when actually trying to use it 'in anger' to buy something.

And like Chris, my wife is in the target market...

almost 7 years ago

Ian Tester

Ian Tester, Senior Product Manager at brightsolid online publishing

Gosh, it's hot in here. I was one of the team at boo.com back in the day. I have a horribly sense of deja-boo when I tried to use this site. Flashturbation.

almost 7 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

I'm staying out of this now before someone gets compared to Hitler.

almost 7 years ago

Chris Hoskin

Chris Hoskin, Chief Marketing Officer at Innoverne Limited

@Matthew Curry - it is Movember 

almost 7 years ago

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N Walker

Whistles site will get better and better because the brand is producing incredible clothes - clothes which women want regardless of the website. After a reasonable amount of time has elapsed and the numbers are interrogated I've no doubt this will be born out. Mr Lomax you've have not proffered any data in support of your position all we've heard is what 'you' espouse and your flagrant disregard for the opinions of others. Pure superstition and conjecture based on your experience with the rather unimpressive Myla and Jigsaw sites. If your wife's in the target market she'll agree with Zoe then...Unless you tell her different of course...

@ Ian. Boo.com failed because they were a little premature had no brick & morter and the clothes were garbage! They never stood a chance.

almost 7 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

Ahhh. Fashion. Something I DO have expertise in.

/goes off topic

I think the clothes are drab and off-trend. Where's the jewel shades? The lace? Studs? Only the stripe bodycon dress and sequin jumpsuit are of any interest (they do get plus points for sequins). The coats are shapeless, where's the flirty coquette-ness of F/W09's key looks?

It wouldn't be bad if Whistles stood for timeless, classic design, but an asymetric mesh top doesn't say timeless to me.....

almost 7 years ago

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Paul Lomax, Chief Technical Officer (CTO) at Dennis Publishing

@N Walker: Actually, the only opinion I've disregarded is yours! Everybody else has made perfectly valid points.

And how dare you call Myla and Jigsaw unimpressive! They weren't designed for the likes of you! 

Irony. ;-)

PS Boo.com failed because they burnt a crap load of money on making the site impressive (silly but 'impressive and innovative' avatar thingy and all the flash wizardry) instead of keeping it simple. As a result their burnt all their cash. Yes, they were too early, but one might argue so was lastminute and amazon, but they focused on e-commerce rather than flashiness.

almost 7 years ago

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Nathan Bentley

I thought long and hard about what to write here, and after considering the merits of what makes a usable site "good" and an unusable site "bad", I decided to give up, clear my comment and start again. Ultimately this comes down to a matter of taste (more on this later). Personally, my money is on this site doing more harm than good - following in the footsteps of Paul Lomax and Matt Curry, I'm convinced that regardless of the target audience, the fundamental flaws in usability will damage the overall conversion rates. 

Any barrier to purchase, regardless of whether you are male, female, straight or gay is a bad thing - setting the overall design aside for the moment (it's not my cup of tea, but hey, I'm not the target audience here), the site suffers from some major roadblocks, which could be fixed with a relatively small amount of effort. Have to retype all my card details again? Nope, sorry, I'm going elsewhere. Have to register to buy clothes? No thanks, I want a dress, not a relationship.

I’m making assumptions here of course, but then I’ve had over a decade of experience working in this industry, especially with e-commerce, and especially within the fashion market. Do I have any data to back up my hunches? Well, yes – without giving away sensitive market information, I’m proud to say that the majority of the women’s fashion e-commerce sites I’ve worked on reached a 400%+ ROI within the first few months of (re)launching, and continued to be highly successful. 

Put simply, that’s women putting clothes into their basket, and successfully making a transaction. Happy women, happy client.

I took a look over my portfolio of e-commerce sites before I write this post to see if I was gender biased, and it turns out that I've done more work with female orientated e-commerce than male. I've spent years of my life working to make fashion e-commerce sites successful, easy to use AND glamorous, which means spending a lot of time interacting with the target audience, gathering feedback and refining. 

I’ve no doubt that, given time, the Whistles site can be refined, and the issues that currently plague it will be smoothed out, allowing it to really perform.

Do I like the site? No. Do the ladies in my office like the site? Yes. Will they happily buy something from it? Maybe not. The figures will show. For Whistles sake, I hope they are proactive in fixing those usability bugs.

Just my 2c.

almost 7 years ago

Chris Hoskin

Chris Hoskin, Chief Marketing Officer at Innoverne Limited

I'm out before a bells and whistles gag is used

almost 7 years ago

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Malcolm Coles, Director at Digital Sparkle

If we're doing gags, I might talk about the usability issues that dog whistles.

almost 7 years ago

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Karnac

Anyone who thinks this site is "good" is a design wonk, and should be required to stay far away from any work that actually needs to generate a profit.

Note, this is NOT sarcasm.  I'm serious.  I fear for the web if you people are decision makers.

almost 7 years ago

Georgina Atwell

Georgina Atwell, Independent Digital Consultant at Magnocarta

Well, I'd like to think of myself as a 'discerning' female and the target audience for this website and I really don't like it. It's got a confused identity. It looks, visually, like a brand site and if you were to treat it as such, then yes it's cool, yes it's slick and yes, it looks like it's been executed by someone in Marketing/Comms whose experience of Online is employing an IT guy in the basement.

If they want to actually make MONEY from this site, the user needs to have the ability to filter by type of dress, price of product, colour etc. They also need to inspire me and show me how easy it is to create an outfit from each product by CROSS SELLING. It doesn't do any of these things. ASOS does filtering brilliantly, letting me find a selection of items based on my criteria (workwear, price, colour etc) and makes shopping a pleasure. REISS does cross-selling beautifully and makes me want to buy, buy, buy. Whistles.co.uk...well, it makes me think the brand is quite stylish but the purchasing process looks like an after thought.

I guess it depends what their objectives were? If it was brand, then great, though they're forgetting that most people expect to be able to purchase from a retailer's website. If it was ecommerce, I think they'll struggle as their conversion is going to be really poor.

This looks like a classic case of a high street retailer realising they need a website and leaving it to the Mar/Comms team when really they need to be using experienced Product Managers and treating it like a separate product strategy who can achieve both brand and sales.

almost 7 years ago

Georgina Atwell

Georgina Atwell, Independent Digital Consultant at Magnocarta

Sorry, not sure what happened to the formatting, that comment was made up of about 4 separate paragraphs!

almost 7 years ago

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Deri Jones, CEO at SciVisum.co.uk

No excuse for users finding it 'treacly' or slow.

Flash sites can make 24/7 monitoring of the speed of User Journeys tricky, but we do lots of flash monitoring.

Flash itself does not mean it has to be slow, but obviously if not done right.... it'll be slow

Deri

almost 7 years ago

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Karnac

Sorry Deri, but you're full of it.  Flash with embedded full screen images/video is slow.  Full stop.  No way to do it "right" or "wrong".  It's a lot of data, and it needs to be moved from a server to your machine. 

almost 7 years ago

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Bob

I struggle to take comments from someone who job is selling rank frozen readymeals very seriously. You should take a look at your own homepage before you comment on other people's.

almost 7 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

Yawn. The rag trade will never learn. Maybe if they looked beyond their insular little clique then atrocities like the Whistles site wouldn't happen.

You're missing the point "Bob". I sell, successfully, to an elderly audience online. So, frankly, I know a hell of a lot more about checkout usability than most.

Whilst Whistles is fortunate enough not to have to sell to my demographic, they have still royally cocked up their excuse for a checkout.

And please, no more whistles/bureau va sockpuppets? You screwed up, admit it and start to make it better.

almost 7 years ago

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Lindsey Annison, Web PR Consultant at Clickthrough Marketing

Ok. I'm female. Live miles from any type of shop, especially Whistles, so you'd think I'd use their website. Have had clothes from there in the past, so presumably am target e-commerce audience.

No chance. Utterly frustrated with the site in about 4mins, have been back several times as I was being dedicated in sussing it because of this thread. And 'cos I quite fancied buying something from there. However, it is now highly likely that next time I am in London or anywhere else, I will probably deliberately not go to Whistles because of this thread and site.

I'm not specifically a usability expert but have probably visited as many websites in my online career as anyone else who does internet marketing and is hyperactive on the Net. It is, scuse my French, bloody awful to use.

From an organic SEO POV, I don't see how it can win much traffic, ergo it is going to cost Whistles an awful lot in other types of promo to attract the audience. Which means those costs need to be passed on.

And whilst some of the target audience possibly have more money than sense when it comes to fashion, having to increase prices or cut profits (ho hum, as if) because you can't design a website that a) works for you b) works for the search engines and c) works for your users is NOT good business.

And finally, how come every model is wearing a pair of jeans that they don't appear to stock?!!

almost 7 years ago

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Mark Bolitho, New Business Director - Ecommerce at more2

N Walker:

'There are an awful lot of presumptions in your critique and your wanton disregard for the opinions of others colours your judgement and is frankly a little worrying. What leads you assume that the site has not been multivariate tested? Were you consulted during the development process?

You clearly have no idea about MV testing, which requires LOTS of traffic, and, therefore, cannot be done before launch.

Plus, Jane Sheperdson of Whistles did exactly what you accuse Paul Lomax of, and ignored the (very well informed) opinions of others in producing this site.

It may well have been 'tested' by those within the commissioning and developing organisations but a case of 'group think' occurred here, I think.

Whilst I slightly dislike the broad term 'best practice' because an e-commerce site is such a contextual medium, there is theoretical best practice which should really be the starting point for any site with the aim of making money.

If this isn't the aim, then have a brochure site with as much Flash as you like.

I'm all for innovation, and actually quite like the look and feel. Others will no doubt, like it too. As for the operation...not so sure - the approach to disregard theoretical best practice is brave but the baby may have been thrown out with the bath water, I fear.

Checkout is horrible, and although there will be people who push through the usability pain and buy, the checkout could be the final straw and prevent them from coming back.

Overall, it's a shame that the poor usability just overshadows the nice attempt at 'coolness', which means the gamble taken by the brand in taking the brave 'chuck it all out' approach to e-commerce hasn't paid off, in my humble opinion, although devout Whistlers will, no doubt, like it.

Taking into consideration the providers involved here, it's going to be a loooong time before a good return is made!

almost 7 years ago

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Mark Bolitho, New Business Director - Ecommerce at more2

No thanks, I want a dress, not a relationship.

I think you've 'gone native', Nathan Bentley...


almost 7 years ago

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Mark Bolitho, New Business Director - Ecommerce at more2

Hi Paul

Yes, I've seen it - a great quote.

Was a lively discussion, this one! Seems to have divided opinion, will be interesting to hear some (unbiassed) results.

almost 7 years ago

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Colin Hiom

Hehe. You guys (and girls) have been enjoying yourselves.

Purely out of curiosity I went to see the site.  I was expecting to side with the "guys" on this one but I thought the site was pretty good. Quite easy to use and fairly appealing. The back-button scenario etc is obviously just a tad off-putting but unless Whistles target audience includes morons - then I would have thought the site was easy enough to use. Do I care that it doesn't cross-sell? No. But then I am a guy and would have only wanted to buy something as a pressy for the other half (a girl, before you ask). Great. Accept I have no idea if the sizes are UK, US or what? I presume they must be UK (being as though it's a UK site) but what is a size "24" vs "34" in denim jeans? If that's inches then it must be leg size! I presume. But what if that's centimetres? Or waist? Or some strange US, or worse, some Eurozone sizing system? I honestly have no idea. Maybe it is inches and waist size but, hold on, surely these models have waists less than 24"!?!?!

Maybe I am moron after all and the site wasn't designed to appeal to me after all.

So looks like the "guys" win! Apologies to "N" (is that a size or a name?), Zoe, Diane.

PS girls did you actually buy anything on there?

almost 7 years ago

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Mark Bolitho, New Business Director - Ecommerce at more2

This is absolutely brilliant - Godwins law is true!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godwin%27s_law

Matthew Currie made it so.

almost 7 years ago

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Paul Lomax, Chief Technical Officer (CTO) at Dennis Publishing

Mark, I suspect Matthew had his tongue firmly in his cheek and Godwin's law in mind when he made that comment :-)

almost 7 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

Remember, every time you visit the Whistles website, God kills a kitten.

almost 7 years ago

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Mark Bolitho, New Business Director - Ecommerce at more2

I'm off there now then - not a cat person...

Methinks you spend far to much time online, Mr Curry...

almost 7 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

Well, it is my job :-)

almost 7 years ago

Chris Hoskin

Chris Hoskin, Chief Marketing Officer at Innoverne Limited

rofl

almost 7 years ago

Ian Tester

Ian Tester, Senior Product Manager at brightsolid online publishing

@colin: under no circumstances go out to buy a clothing based gift for your other half without accompaniment. 24" legs...... ooh yah.

almost 7 years ago

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Colin Hiom

@Ian: well I am only 4' 2". ;-)

almost 7 years ago

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mattblack

I never comment on these threads but stumbled across this one and felt that I had to jump to Whistles' defence.

I can't beleive that there has been so much written on this thread by so few people. There are some guys here that have submitted 1000's of words each, all bemoaning the "lack of usability" and "decreased conversion rates" etc. Guys, this website is not for YOU, it is not aimed at men who want to purchase somethying quickly and easily - job done. It is DESIGNED to be an experience. The target audience is women, women that already know and understand the brand - (and if they don't, they wou.ld be blind not to have some understanding of it!!!) if you guys had bothered to learn more about the brand and values then I don't think you'd have spent quite SO much time trying to show off your "quasi authority" to others like you who also feel this need.

You must understand that web users are a lot more savvy than you give them credit for, people DO understand what a link is, and they DO understand basic navigation, they CAN understand the principles of a website that doesn't necessarily conform to ALL best practice. From some of the comments on this thread you'd think the ste would be impossible to use, however, far from it!!!!

In my experience and from converstaions with others, users actualy prefer to look at, and use, a visually stimulating/interesting/different/and exciting website than the plethora of boring run-of-the-mill ecommerce sites. This is a shopping experience which is what Whisltes seems to be all about.

I'm not a woman and I love the site, I can appreciate how refreshing it is to see such a great looking - and GREAT FUNCTIONING website. Hats off to Whistles!

over 6 years ago

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Alison Keith

Terrible user experience and poorly designed. Typical "aren't we clever" designing rather than making it easy to use. Rubbish.

over 6 years ago

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Constance Hannon

The Whistles site is terrible.  Too busy.  I like the advent calendar idea (looked at the site December 16.)  It's definitely different.  The initial wow factor held my attention.  The site didn't display their clothes - Whistles IS a clothing store, isn't it?  But, the site is too difficult to use.  Checked some of the comments.  I wouldn't go out of my way to not shop there like some of the users say.  If I was walking by and their window display was appealing, I'd check it out.

over 6 years ago

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Jo

Wow, what a lot of... opinions :)

Right. I am female and shop online a lot, and this site is frustrating and annoying and hard to use. Yes it looks lovely, but if I want to browse and meander and all the rest of it, I'll go to a shop. If I have something in mind that I specifically want, then buying from a website is ideal. So no, I don't want to browse, I just want to be able to find the thing I'm looking for, buy it, and be done.

Blergh. I like a lot of Bureau VA's work, but this feels like it's really not their best - or at least, it feels like it's been put together with all the thought into design, and none into anything else.

over 6 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

OK, Matt.

I very heavily argue that the central conceit of "Women shop differently than men online" is wrong. Unless Whistles are keeping something from the rest of the ecommerce community, and that they spent hours in a usability lab, monitoring womens browsing behaviour, then this is a massive generalisation, bordering on sexist.

However, that isn't the issue here. Usability, simplicity, and accessibilty are things that transcend gender.

Innovation should be applauded. Bravery shoud be applauded. Arrogance and laziness should not. The Whistles site was not designed to be usable. It was not designed to be simple, and it certainly wasn't designed to be accessible. I fear it was designed to get column inches.

That anyone considers this site as progress concerns me. If it was truly innovative it wouldn't have been done in entirely in flash, it would degrade gracefully, deep products links would work, as would the back button. Personally I would love to see this done in standards. I would applaud Whistles if next year they reimplemented this concept in an accessible manner.

My biggest gripe however, is the schizophrenia of the site. THe merchanising end has clearly had a lot of thought put into it. This may have been the thought of a print agency, rather than a UX one, but thats by the by. The checkout part of the site is generic, dull and unrefined. It feels like they didn't care - to me, that is an insult and it's an insult to their customers.

over 6 years ago

Ian Tester

Ian Tester, Senior Product Manager at brightsolid online publishing

I am enjoying this thread tremendously. Keep it coming.

over 6 years ago

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malcolm coles

Mattblack: you can't easily search by size or price. That's not an experience - it's annoying. For everyone.

over 6 years ago

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mattblack

Malcolm, perhaps not being able to easily search by size is annoying for you when buying your wife a Christmas present for example, but how many people seriously go onto a website just searching for "something in my size" or "in my price range" without browsing the garments first? That's a very uninspired way of shopping and I guess it's these uninspired shoppers that will not be taken with this website, and quite rightly so as these shoppers would probably be better off on other standard ecommerce websites with standard usability, standard search tools, standard look and feel - and standard brand and clothes.

The website's target audience, I'm sure, is aimed at younger women who will most definitely not have the same usability hang ups as some of the people commenting on this thread. Maybe those people finding the website "difficult to use" should not be using the internet at all.

over 6 years ago

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Paul Lomax, Chief Technical Officer (CTO) at Dennis Publishing

Matt: when you're shopping then the first thing you do is check the size. In the real world you can rifle through a ton of clothes you like the look of in a rack really quickly to see whats in your size. On a website without a search by size function, you're going to be spending a long time clicking and waiting for pages to load.

You're confusing browsing for shopping. Only in the former are you looking to be inspired. In the latter, you're looking for clothes to wear.

over 6 years ago

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Mark Bolitho, New Business Director - Ecommerce at more2

Interesting to hear the use of general terms like 'they' and  'younger women'.

This in itself illustrates a dangerous and, dare i say, ignorant perspective - are all 'younger women' the same...? No, some will love it and some will hate it.

This conception of this website has clearly been a selfish process by people behind the brand who are entirely free to approach it in the way they have. If it was 1999 I'd say 'well done - how innovative', but we ended up where we are now because of sites like this years ago weren't actually very good at what they were supposed to achieve.

over 6 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

oh matt, matt matt matt matt matt.

there's no such thing as "standard usability" - That's like saying "standard Red". You should always offer basic filtering options, and designing for one single user persona is just plain bad. Really. The thought makes me want to cry.

You don't just make assumptions for your visitor base. Never do this, never never never never. You go out, you test, you talk, you heart beats to the drum of your customers.

You have a think then test again. And again.

What you don't do is make a sweeping generalisation about the needs of your visitors because it fits the visual aethetic of your board and the creative director of a print agency.

"sobs openly"

over 6 years ago

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malcolm coles

Mattblack: "how many people seriously go onto a website just searching for "something in my size" or "in my price range" without browsing the garments first?"

Well, people have different modes, of course. Some might like to have a look round for inspiration. But when it comes to buying stuff, then I would argue one of the very first questions is what have you got this fits me, and the second is what have you got in my price range.

This isn't "uninspired" shopping - it's narrowing down your options to things that are relevant to you. Yes you might be browse first. But ultimately, you've got £100 and you need a party dress for friday. Randomly clicking stuff you like to see if's in your size nad price range is NOT a good user experience.

over 6 years ago

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Anonymous

As a professional mid thirties women who has bought Whistles clothes for the last 8 to 10 years I think both the website and the collection are awful. I work in Ecommerce and I would not be proud to put my name to a site that is this difficult to browse! Maybe this website is part of some cunning plan by Jane Shepherdson to move the Whistles brand to higher price points and make it more niche? The strategy being to alienante loyal customers like myself  by not offering figure flattering clothes anymore and make the brand appeal to very rich and thin under 25 year olds?

Whistles was always a great brand if you wanted superb fabrics, cut and quality and you were willing to pay a bit more than the likes of Topshop and Oasis but this website just seems to prove the brand has really lost it's way recently - just like me on their site!

Catherine

over 6 years ago

Chris Hoskin

Chris Hoskin, Chief Marketing Officer at Innoverne Limited

'HIPPO' springs to mind.

HIghest Paid Person's Opinion

over 6 years ago

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Malcolm Coles, Director at Digital Sparkle

Purchasing was a big problem, and people couldn't be bothered.

Feedback from actual customers. Enough said.

over 6 years ago

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Richard V

The whole point of an eccomerce website is smooth purchasing; This site has more friction to sale than any site I have seen for quite a while. Someone, somewhere has forgotten the basic concepts of marketing and sales.

over 6 years ago

Ian Tester

Ian Tester, Senior Product Manager at brightsolid online publishing

so the consensus is "pretty, but fail"? <ducks for cover>

over 6 years ago

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Magnocarta

All in favour say "Aye"

over 6 years ago

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Paul Lomax, Chief Technical Officer (CTO) at Dennis Publishing

Hmm, what happened to the comment from "Sally" I just got an email notification from but now isn't on the site - moderated?

It looked nice and juicy too!

"I worked for Whistles for 4 years, and left 8 months after

Jane joined the company. After 2 months of meetings full of hyped up
topshop a..."

over 6 years ago

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Malcolm Coles, Director at Digital Sparkle

Paul - she was the one who said:

Purchasing was a big problem, and people couldn't be bothered.

Plus lots of other interesting things too!

over 6 years ago

Chris Lake

Chris Lake, CEO at Empirical Proof

I'm afraid we removed the comment as it could be considered borderline defamatory. 

c.

over 6 years ago

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Jenny Simpson

I just HAVE to stick my twopennorth in.

Although I dislike Flash I was willing to give it a chance - but it's awful.  Slow to load (in Firefox) and utterly random in the way it speeds up and slows down. I'm not being mean for the sake of it, but it was literally making me a little queasy.

Also, it didn't work as a design for me - it was the opposite of inviting and didn't showcase the clothing - surely the whole point.

Without repeating everyone's points above, it is clearly far from being finished.  I also agree with whoever it was who said that if they were really being pioneering and original they would have used jquery, not flash.  Is this 1999 all over again?

And in response to some of the rather patronising points about female web users - I am female (last time I checked) and I have previously shopped at Whistles - so I am bang on the Whistles demographic - yet I still strongly dislike it and find it unusable (yes, that's the point of usability tests).

The website is the virtual shop window and this looks like the type of shop where you have to reach past unhelpful, silent shop assistants to take a closer look at an item of clothing, then end up walking out  because the atmosphere is damned unfriendly, confusing and even if the clothes are amazing you can't be bothered to find out.

over 6 years ago

Paul Gill

Paul Gill, Account Director at Torchbox

Wondering what effect the redesign had upon the £5m loss posted by Whistles today... (see Retail Week)

over 6 years ago

Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton, Editor in Chief at ClickZ Global

Can't imagine it helped much. 

over 6 years ago

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Brian Mathers

I stumbled across this debate when looking for other information on the econsultancy site, and have just spent some considerable time reading through a lot of the comments made above. And many of the comments coming from just a handful of people, who I don't doubt are all equally talented in their own way. But guys, if like me you are involved in making websites sell, there is no point in getting hot under the collar about the design of this site. WHY? Well brand sells and if you have a strong well known brand people are going to come to such sites without much hassle. Just type in the brand and your there.

Yes, the site is a little quirky it fails some usability tests, but the biggest audience who will come here are woman. Now, there are some sharp women out there who might very well pick faults with this website from a user experience. And withouth doubt there will be some other woman with technical knowledge who will come and be equally frustrated by other things.

What I looked at being an SEO person was the indexing of the site with the major search engines, which of course the article did not go into. But, having just done some simple tests, I was quite taken by how some of the page URL addresses were being indexed and listed for some search terms I chose.

So, the Whistles site I believe will be successful, but successful anyway because its brand powered. I don't think there will be an SEO debate here, as in my opinion all big brand sites don't need to put too much effort into SEO. Of course big brands operate with huge SEO budgets, but big brand sites with lots of pages and foot print across the internet will gain good rankings. WHY? Because such big players can play with much larger budgets than your small etailer. At this end of the spectrum they cannot get away with such architecture, because many are unknown little etailers, who have to work a lot harder to be found and so there websites must be much more search engine friendly.

But hey, I enjoyed the read here this evening and Britain's Got Talent when you read some of the stuff here. And so at no matter what level of online ecommerce we work in power to the websites that make a few bucks, eh!

about 6 years ago

Mark Selwyn

Mark Selwyn, eCommerce and Multi-Channel Retail Consultant

Sorry to drag up old blogs. I wanted to show Whistles homepage for a presentation tomorrow to show a site that doesn't conform to the norm......but its now changed back to a "normal" homepage.

I guess they eventually threw out that which pleased them visually and designed something that conformed to best practice online.

over 2 years ago

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