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Matty the moley moleLast month, I was unfortunate enough to lose my glasses.  Since I am a speccy four-eyes moley moleman, this has caused me some problems.

So rather than traipse down to an optician and be up-sold to hell and back because obviously anything less than their £200 SuperHyperThin lenses will be akin to milk bottle bottoms and will scratch within seconds, I decided to buy a couple of new pairs of glasses online.

What I found was a combination of usability horror stories, really great ideas, some truly awful stock photography, an occasional understanding of the audience, and an amazing lack of realisation that I'm practically blind here.

This is by no means an exhaustive review of every online optician out there, but these are the sites I tried.

www.spex4less.com
www.glassesframesandlenses.com
www.glassesdirect.com
www.selectspecs.com
www.toniandguy-opticians.co.uk (I know, they don't just cut hair!)
www.irisoptical.co.uk
www.speckyfoureyes.com

And some others that were just so dull I can't even be bothered typing in the URL.

For full disclosure, I ended up buying from SelectSpecs and Toni & Guy

So after going through this somewhat tortuous ordeal, I thought I would write what amounts to a Melissa Manifesto for online opticians.

1: Know your audience

Big fricking pictures

Let's cover the basics here. Why am I purchasing glasses online? Because I need glasses! So why do so many websites offer a barely magnified "larger image" of the primary purpose for why I am on their stupid site in the first place? Argh.

Prescription examples

This is genius. No, correction, it is utter genius. On the Glasses, Frames and Lenses website, they show a series of prescription examples from high-street opticians, and how to interpret them. I was so impressed when I saw this, not for what it was, but because it showed me that someone had sat down and actually thought about Usage Scenarios for the site.

I was sitting there, in front of my computer, with a barely decipherable prescription in front of me, wondering how to translate it into the form presented to me. Again, Genius.

Aside: what high street opticians don't want you to know!

There's a secret, special magic number, called a Pupil Distance. I've never had this magic number written on any prescription I've ever received, but apparently it's vital to receiving glasses you can actually see through.

Pupil Distance, as you can probably guess, is the distance between your pupils. If you don't know the distance between your pupils, then what's there to do?

SelectSpecs offers a little gizmo to buy, for the costly sum of £0.01. Honestly? You can't just offer a PDF formatted to A4 that I can print off and cut out? I have to spend a penny, so to speak, and wait for what is essentially a ruler to arrive in the post before placing my order?

2: Differentiate from offline

Why do people shop online for things in the first place? Why was I going online to purchase my glasses? Two reasons: One: Because online offers me a much wider choice, and Two: To save money.

Up-sell if you have to, but do it right.

After using endless optical websites, I think I understand the business model. The money isn't made on the frames, the frames themselves are high-margin, but that margin goes to the manufacturers. No, the real money is made on the lenses, which is why every optician makes such a big song and dance about them. Remember however, I'm going online not to be up-sold to, so don't make it a barrier.

Laws of simplicity

So, you have to up-sell your fancy lenses, but how do you go about it?

This goes back to my post about the Language of B2B. Lenses, I imagine, are complex things to craft, and you can tell that the majority of sites revel in this complexity as a way of encouraging up-sell. This is wrong. All I care about is:

  • How thick will the lenses be (remember, I am practically blind here).
  • How much my beautiful blue eyes will be distorted by them.

Taking a note from John Maeda's wonderful Laws of Simplicity:

Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious and adding the meaningful. Find a balance between how simple something can be, and how complex it has to be"

Here's an example from Toni & Guy, which combines some good information with some nonsense numbers which mean nothing to me.

Some parts are good, some parts are bad

3: Remove the fear

spex4less is all about the fear

Oh my sweet Jesus. Who is Marc Bowden and why is he trying to petrify me with a giant warning message that appears when I visit his site?

Oh my god. Close the browser! Close the Browser now!

It's just all wrong. You know what it reminds me of? Another certain site with an incredibly vociferous owner who I daren't mention for fear of been hunted down by her millions! of! satisfied! customers! all armed with pitchforks.

Screw face shapes

Allegedly, there appears to be some type of science behind choosing the right frames to suit your face. Unfortunately, this science is trapped in the Eighties.

Choosing glasses for when you're about to star in an A-Ha video

This is a distraction. It adds fear that I'm not choosing the right frames for my self-judged "Face Shape" - Am I a Diamond or a Pear? No, let me choose the frames I think look nice, and then I'll decide if they suit me, thankyouverymuch.

Virtual Mirrors

Glasses Direct recently won an Econsultancy Innovation Award for their virtual mirror. I couldn't try it as I'm on a Mac, and it doesn't seem to work under VMware Fusion, but that's by the by, it's a concept that has been widely copied, to varying levels of complexity.

I do however wonder if this is actually of any use. Has anyone done a study to see if conversion rate increases if someone uses Virtual Mirror technology? I can see how it would work in theory, however I think that the technology is still too far behind our needs.

Try at Home

Glasses Direct - Try at Home

A number of sites, including Glasses Direct, now offer a "try at home" system, where you can borrow a number of frames for a few days to see if you think they suit you.

This, if you aren't quite as moley and dependant on needing glasses as I am, seems like quite a good idea. I asked on Twitter who had tried this, and had a reply from Amrit Gill

It's a pretty straight forward process, basically select up to four frames you dig and enter in your details, including bank details. You have 10 days to return the glasses else they'll charge you for them!

The glasses all come in a box, with a leaflet explaining how long you have, and instructions for you to send them back. The thing i did like about this, is that i had them sent to my office, normally when i go get specs its normally down to my own judgment if they look okay, but because i've got them in the office, i can ask everyone's opinion.

Sending the glasses back was simple, and they even send you an email confirming they've received the package.  They also send you a nice reminder during the trial "How you getting along with the glasses?".

Actual glasses on actual people

This, I know will be difficult, but it makes so much of a difference. Iris Optical, without this, wouldn't generally be worth mentioning, but they've made a massive effort. By photographing each pair of spectacles on a model, I can not only have a better idea of their fit, I also understand the colours of the frames so much better. Remember, if the frames are made of a light reflective metal then always having them photographed on a white background makes it hard to realise this.

I can be a sexy librarian too

4: Commoditise and Die

This is a biggie. And gives you a good idea of how people’s brains work. So I was on Iris Spectacles looking at these really nice Marc Jacobs glasses and I noticed something in the title - MJ 227. It seems odd, but most online opticians sell their glasses as if they were electrical goods.

Model Numbers

Are they buying a pair of glasses, something that they will wear for most of the day, every day from you, or are they buying Qty 1 of  MJ 227? Urgh. Unless you are the cheapest online optician in all the land, then you really don’t want to do this.

By actively promoting the model number on your site you are just asking for your visitor to search elsewhere for the same pair but cheaper. And of course, you're not even making any money on these frames!  Of course, have the Model Number discreetly put at the end of the title of in the meta, so that you can be found when people search for it, but don't stick it in big letters.

Photography

I think I get how this works. All online opticians (well, maybe not Glasses Direct) are essentially white labels for the same manufacturers – I assume in Hong Kong or somewhere. Sometimes you even say "your glasses will be shipped from Hong Kong" (Oh come on, really? Why would you say this?).

These manufactures send you what is essentially stock photography of the frames that you resell for them. This is why every pair of glasses is shot against a white background at a jaunty 30 degree angle.

This again, brings me to the Iris Opticals example. By putting in the effort of re-shooting each pair that they sell, not only have they given me an escalated user experience, they've also un-commoditised themselves. Now if only they've remove that pesky model number...

Is that all?

Well hey, look I have my glasses now! Aren't they nice?

I have glasses!

Well yes they are, but this is only half the story. Once I've decided the glasses I'm going to buy, and the site I'm going to buy them from, and navigated the perilous realm of entering prescriptions and being upsold lense types, I place the order.

What comes next is a whole different experience, but that's for another post....

Matthew Curry

Published 22 March, 2010 by Matthew Curry

Matt Curry is Head of E-commerce for online sex toy retailer LoveHoney. He spends a lot of time working on user experience and customer satisfaction is his highest priority. He frequently has to be penetration tested. You can follow him on Twitter, although he does often talk about dildos. He also has a LinkedIn profile, where he has to act professional.

19 more posts from this author

Comments (46)

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Tim Lennon

Good work. Not only was I minimally interested in buying glasses online in the first place, but you've already convinced me - before the buying stage - that I'd be wasting my time.

Nope, I'd rather go to my local optician (the one who knows my name, provides useful advice on what to buy and what not to buy, offers me the options that actually might make a difference to me, and then charges me pretty much what I'd spend at any other store), and keep my high street looking fine.

Besides, do you have ANY IDEA how much it probably costs them to re-shoot all the frames on someone's head? It will probably only differentiate them as the first bunch of spectacle cookie-cutters to go bust ....

over 6 years ago

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James

Nice article Matthew - we'll take the comments on board for inclusion in our site re-development plan! :) With regards to the PD and 'our little gizmo', we recently tried to send out printable PD rulers in a PDF document as we realise this is a quicker way to get our customers PD readings. Unfortunately the problem we found was that the printing relied on everyones printer settings being identical to ensure that the PD ruler measurements are accurate to the nearest mm, and we found that when printing on both a Mac and a PC the printed results were completely different - and when you're working in mm the smallest difference could result in your glasses being made slightly wrong. The best way of getting the most accurate reading is to request this measurement from your optician, unfortunately opticians are under no obligation to give you this measurement at the moment. Also, shooting glasses on a person is a great idea, in theory, but we have available over 20,000 designer model options and this range is changing on a daily basis, it would be a logistical nightmare to photograph every item on a person (or even for a virtual mirror)! Kind regards, James SelectSpecs.com

over 6 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

Hi Tim,

the article wasn't really intended as  "state of the union", rather a "what can we do about this". I don't think I've ever experienced what you've described on the High Street, but I'm sure it exists. However, just saying that online can't offer the same experience isn't exactly why we're here now, is it.

So how do we offer an analogous or even better experience? Is some form of video-chat with an optician preferable? In my experience the staff at high street opticians simply exist to upsell the most expensive lenses, and generally don't have my best interests at heart, so maybe we should go social with this? Hey, Frameroulette!

As for the thorny issue of photography, if you are one of the hundreds of online opticians, then you simply have to differentiate, to only differentiate on price would be to commoditise.

I don't imagine it would drive any healthy business bust, if it was worked into the cost of sales. you could even test it, by photographing a random seleciton of say, 30 frames (a days shoot, at most) and checking the conversion rate uplift of those frames. You could then work out the cost vs increased revenue, and make a judgement.

Dave, got your email, nothings intended as a kicking! Glassesdirect I think was one of the best sites I saw. Now if only that pesky virtual mirror would work on a mac...

Matty

over 6 years ago

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Rebecca

I've bought several pairs of specs from selectspecs because they're so cheap I don't mind if I sit on them or if the puppy chews them. They still look decent, arrive quickly and have never broken the bank. I also found the process really hassle free

over 6 years ago

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John

Greetings from a High Street Opticians, I own my own practice, qualified for 20 years, low overheads so no silly prices, often get people coming to me who tell me they have spent £400-£500 on a pair of specs, we simply offer good service and reasonable prices (£199 maximum) and make sure they fit properly if all high street practices did this then everyone would be better off. Problem is is getting the message across that us some of us independents offer good value for money Its simple economics really More expensive overheads and lots of staff = higher prices..Great article by the way Matt

over 6 years ago

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Fraser Robertson

Nice article Matt. Trouble is, you've missed the point completely. Somebody, somewhere, somehow has got to test your eyes to find out what you need to make you see (and also to advise you not die of something you didn't even know about). Currently the NHS doesn't do this for anyone except the very poor, so an optician has to. With all the overheads, equipment and training that he has had to pay for to even be in the high street at all, it costs about £70 to actually perform an eye test. And no, UK PLC in the form of the NHS isn't going to give everyone eye care ever again...

Yes, even Specsavers have this problem, they just buy very, very cheap products (yes, from Hong Kong) and pass it off as "designer" and shove as many people through their stores as humanly possible without actually crushing them into the testing room, and "selling up" like there is no tomorrow.

So what happens when all the "clever" money goes online/Tesco's? You will have no opticians, or an eye test will have to cost you about £70.

So it doesn't matter how cheap you can get your specs, or how lovely the website, without an optician.... need I go on?

over 6 years ago

Matthew Curry

Matthew Curry, Head of Ecommerce at Lovehoney

Hi Fraser, sorry but that's not the point of this article either, I'm not here to discuss the ethics of High Street vs Online, but that currently Online doesn't offer as good an experience as I would like, and I'd like to encourage online opticians to improve that. To be blunt, no high-street optician experience I have had has ever been a good one. I'm not going to defend this by saying "oh they lose money on eye tests so they have to make money somewhere else". Frankly boo hoo. That's not the game I'm in. The funniest thing is, is that high-street opticians seem to have the worst online presences. If you were smart, you'd go multi-channel with this. I go in, get my eye test, if can't find the frames I want, I get a voucher to use on the website that entitles me to whatever the loyalty incentive offer is, and a code I can punch in that will automatically fill out my prescription. The whole thing feels awfully commission based on upselling lenses - I imagine the prevailing mentality is "I can't send them online as I'll lose my sales commission". This is an old business model that just can't survive nowadays. High-street opticians have the advantage of brand name recognition and bums on seats (which is often the actual case when you're sat there waiting), but they don't capitalise on it.

over 6 years ago

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Fraser Robertson

OK, Matt, point taken. That's not your mission here, I understand that.

And yes the High Street optician experience is frankly hideous. As you have so rightly pointed out, the online experience is pretty lousy as well! Unfortunately because bums are required on seats to make sure the eye testing service is paid for, it is not in the High Street's interest to improve that experience.

Design an on-line eye test and you'll be a millionaire!

over 6 years ago

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Craig McLaughlan

@matthew

good article and fair criticisms.

@David Carruthers

well played! your website mightn't be tiptop but whoever setup your SM presence is on the ball.

over 6 years ago

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Tina

Really good article and I do believe that we can all benefit from this type of discussion; it extends us the opportunity for improvement based on 'real' user experience and also lets us know what we are doing well. Thanks for the thumbs up re our different prescriptions being scanned from high street opticians. We have even gone one further this week; in recognition of our customer dilemmas, our customers can now choose to 'opt out' of completing the prescription minefield and instead send it to us to descipher for them! Our customers are responding very postively to it. In addition to this, they can also 'save' their prescription details for future purchases. As a small family business, customer service is our future growth and we will continue to scan our brains to think about what we can do next ..... watch this space, we have something big up our sleeve.

Cheers

over 6 years ago

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Karl

.... You should've gone to Specsavers!

over 6 years ago

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evision

ww.onilneuniversalwork.com

over 6 years ago

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evision

ww.onilneuniversalwork.com

over 6 years ago

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Sam Perry

This is an insightful article and I think it clearly highlights that while inroads have been made in some cases just how far online retailers of prescription glasses still have to go. For me many of these websites, and I have experienced some of the frustrations of trying to buy from a few of those mentioned here, make the whole process far too complicated when they should be working at keeping things simple, supportive and above all easy. Personally I feel that the ultimate key to good online service, which is touched upon here, is that online retailers absoutely must go that extra mile precisely because they are online and because I can't literally touch the glasses or try them on. This means they must excell in all other areas to compensate for what they can't do. I look forward to the day when I can purchase prescription glasses online with a bit more confidence, especially as it usually proves to be an expensive shopping trip.

about 6 years ago

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nate g

There is a new iphone app out called Pupil Meter that allowed me to take my own pd's. I felt the accuracy was spot on. I sent an email with the photo of the measurements including my near and far pd's. Here is a link to the site that is on the app: http://sunmoresystems.com/Sunmore_Systems/Pupil_Meter_iPhone.html

almost 6 years ago

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OneSpecs

Really interesting article!  I've used the PD meter iPhone app too and it's great!  Some bods at MIT have also created an Android App that creates your whole prescription for you.  All you need is a £2 lenses to attach to your phone.  Read about them at onespecs.co.uk/blog

almost 6 years ago

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JC

About a year ago I bought my first pair of glasses online at 39dollar glasses based in the USA the glasses are fine.

I have a hard time getting glasses of the strength I need (Sph = +8.00, Cyl = 2.25, Axis = 142 & reading +1.50) Far sigted and astigmatic (Almost blind)  Over the years I have had nightmares with high street opticians who don't always get it right. High street glasses cost me in excess of £700 unless I want to walk around looking like captain pugwash.(milk bottle bottom lenses)

The online glasses I purchased arrived after a few weeks and after a period of visual adjustment they were absolutely fine yet they cost less than 25%, yes 75% less than the high street ones and from a vision point of niew I have had less problems with them than I have had with my previous high street purchased lenses also the coating on the frames has not worn off the way my last pair of Davidoff frames did (after about a year).

I am convinced the high street opticians cushy business model days are numbered, (embrace the change or die !), and I for one will not be sad to see the back of them. Online is the way to go although it's imperative you find a good site and get all the measurements absolutely spot, especially with my type of prescription.

Online at the moment is a minefield and your article above does not even touch on which sites can deliver and which should be avoided. I am unlucky in the difficulty of my prescription, but lucky in that only sites confident in their own abilities seem prepared to attempt to supply my prescription which automatically sorts the wheat from the chaf.

The only minor downside I had with my online glasses is that the cut of the lense is not as good as the zeiss lenses I had before (the bottom rim is not as thin/flush with the frame) but they are a stronger reading prescription and this minor irritation is well worth the £550 pound saving.

Bye the way, your glasses look great.

almost 6 years ago

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nigedo

The biggest issue I've had online or on the high street is finding frames the right size for my broad face.

In high-street clothing stores, stock is sensibly displayed by size. Why would I want to waste my time rifling through rails of shirts, looking for a style I like, if none of them fit? The same thing should obviously apply to glasses frames.

I would be deeply impressed by any high street opticians that would actually measure my features professionally and accurately tell me what SIZE frames I need.

This problem is compounded by the seemingly arbitrary sizes in which frames are supplied. Who decides that a frame is only available with 53mm lense sockets with a 17mm bridge?

If clothing stores sold this way they'd be laughed at and rightly so.

over 5 years ago

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Pat Gibson

My main concern about online opticians is the quality of the lenses. I really looked forward to getting my new pair from Wantglasses - but when they arrived the 'thinner' 1.67 lenses were like the bottom of bottles. They are double the thickness of my high street opticians 1.67 lenses. Wantglasses refuse to accept this and I fear I may have to chase them through the county court to get my money back. Any suggestions

over 5 years ago

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glasses

how ican be sure it suits me

about 5 years ago

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Jon Large

Excellent article Matthew.

I've just been to Vision Express. I had the eye test, then sat down to discuss new frames and lenses. I established with the 'sales' assistant that I was only after a price.

At the end of that exercise I then asked for my pupillary distance. "I cannot do that, as that is part of dispensing." I asked if I could pay for it to be measured, and was told "I'm afraid not".

Vision Express had better start getting wise in my opinion.

almost 5 years ago

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A. Burgess

If I were able to get an eye test somewhere where a shop were not attached to the operation I would be prepared to pay more for it. At the moment I find myself dreaming up all kinds of excuses why I don't want to walk out of their shop with an order and an enormous bill. The last time I tried asking for a really obscure combination of features. They had exactly the pair in a nice colour and style. I showed a weak interest but declared that my husband would probably hit the roof when I told him the price (and he did!). So they put the frame in a special bag for me so that I could reserve them for a week and a half. They just don't give up easily. At least I managed to walk out with a copy of my prescription, unlike my daughter.

Perhaps the answer is to declare up front that I never buy my glasses from the company that gave me the prescription. That would just spell it out plainly, but we Brits are too afraid of offending people to say something like that!

Thanks for a most informative article. I'll definitely be looking at the Iris site!

almost 5 years ago

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Lorna

Thank-you for an interesting and informative article. I have had a look at a couple of the websites and I have on criticism of the Toni&Guy site, which is that they make you walk through every designer and every style, and after the first few screens I am getting a bit bored! They have a Help section which suggests what colours & shapes might suit your hair colour etc. but then they don't let you actually SEE what they are selling which matches those suggestions. It is a bit like an assistant saying "red frames would really suit you",walking off and leaving you to search the shop yourself, then when you have found a pair saying "oh, but we can't put varifocal lenses in THOSE!".

almost 4 years ago

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Eyewear

good resource above mention, but buying online is difficult when you don't know your number.

almost 4 years ago

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Sohbet

My main concern about online opticians is the quality of the lenses. I really looked forward to getting my new pair from Wantglasses - but when they arrived the 'thinner' 1.67 lenses were like the bottom of bottles. They are double the thickness of my high street opticians 1.67 lenses. Wantglasses refuse to accept this and I fear I may have to chase them through the county court to get my money back. Any suggestions

almost 4 years ago

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kelebek

he online glasses I purchased arrived after a few weeks and after a period of visual adjustment they were absolutely fine yet they cost less than 25%, yes 75% less than the high street ones and from a vision point of niew I have had less problems with them than I have had with my previous high street purchased lenses also the coating on the frames has not worn off the way my last pair of Davidoff frames did (after about a year).

almost 4 years ago

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Charles

It is attitudes like those of Jon Large and A Burgess that are causing independent optical businesses to go bankrupt.
FYI it is the advice of the governing bodies that dispensing of spectacles and testing of eye be done by the same person/practice.
What you all consider to be upselling is not just working on commission! I can't speak for the likes of Specsavers or other multiples but in independent practice it is not.Do you actually think we would wear the cheapest lenses or buy specs online ourselves? NO! That is because vision is the most important of all of our senses and deserves to be treated with respect. Not using bog standard lenses that reflect light, cause glare, scratch easily and resemble a jam jar. We are offering you a service and would be doing you a dis-service by not telling you all of the available options. I trained for three years for the qualification to dispense spectacles, obviously that was a waste of my time and money since you clearly don't need expertise. Jeez.

almost 4 years ago

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Charles

Also I would be very interested to hear who is adjusting your specs when they are loose or putting in screws when they fall out?

A service I currently provide free of charge, maybe I should start charging a premium...!

almost 4 years ago

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David

Great article. You put a lot of thought into the process. I feel that some of your input may have been more biased towards your particular shopping experience preference, but who wouldn't do that. That article was spot on. We are dealing with many of the issues you spoke of currently with an optics client. They have a long way to go.

over 3 years ago

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Mynet

FYI it is the advice of the governing bodies that dispensing of spectacles and testing of eye be done by the little. . I feel that some of your input may have been more biased towards your particular shopping experience preference, but who wouldn't do that.

over 3 years ago

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Chat Odaları

That would just spell it out plainly, but we Brits are too afraid of offending people to say something like that! like..

over 3 years ago

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Mynet Sohbet

he last time I tried asking for a really obscure combination of features

over 3 years ago

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Chat

seven seveni affedermiş darılma, hemen nefrete sarılma..

over 3 years ago

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Chat

kırma, kırma seven gönlümü kırma..

over 3 years ago

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Sohbet

lenka - chat pipi o like my got

over 3 years ago

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chat

wery nice thankss

over 3 years ago

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gareth lucocq

Very interesting article thank you Matthew. I am going to try some of the points you have mentioned.
I have a small shop based in Cardiff where I offer my customers great brands at really competitive prices. In August last year I set up an ecommerce site and am I continually trying to improve it and make it easier for customers to navigate. If you would like to have a look at my site I would be very grateful for any comments you may have.
Thanks
Gareth

over 3 years ago

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Glasses Shop

Great Information. I think this kind of post make people more aware about eye care.

over 3 years ago

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mesa garage doors

I found lots of interesting information here. The post was professionally written and I feel like the author has extensive knowledge in this subject. Nice post. Thanks.

over 3 years ago

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Chris

Excellent Article.

I've been a big fan of using Visio-Rx.com as my supplier for prescription glasses. I rented one of their P.D meters because none of the opticians in my area would give my P.D.

http://www.visio-rx.com/vision-topics/accessories/pd-meters

over 3 years ago

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Grace Davies, frames at frames

The blog shows and try to win the faith of the people that can go for online purchase. The options is good but i will try once to buy so i can check whether i could get be comfortable with it or not.

about 3 years ago

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Tim Wigan, Designer at Perfect Glasses

.... You should've gone www.perfectglasses.co.uk

almost 3 years ago

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, Optom at Self

Very risky business buying them online, the staff in the opticians tend to be experts in their field whereas anyone online could potentially be selling you them.

What people don't realise is you will see through a basic lens aswell as a more expensive one, but you will not see as well due to distortions across the lens you will get more glare and the lens will be thicker, heavier, scratch easier, have no uv protection and as I can see in your photo cause more magnification so your eyes look abnormally large. You get what you pay for!!!

Essilor, Zeiss and Nikon=good quality lenses, lots of others are poor imitations that generally don't do the job so well!

over 2 years ago

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cengiz asikoglu, teknisyen at kombi servisi

But with hundreds of dealers and thousands of artists, the problems is how do you stand out. The Art Position container format helped. Instead having a booth, you had your own space. And next to the containerized galleries, there was a nice little bar and cafe, also made out of containers http://www.klimaservisi.gen.tr

over 2 years ago

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Ted Lawson, Marketing at DDS Dental Care

I got two pairs of glasses, one pair acetate and one stainless steel from optician365.com and I found them to be really great quality for the price. They're $49.50 with delivery and the lenses.

The prescription form was easy to fill out as it had all the numbers from my prescription. I actually made a mistake and they were able to identify it and sent me an email to clarify.

Their customer service was really quick and I ended up getting both pairs in under 2 weeks.

Ive heard about people having bad experiences with glasses online but I don't wanna pay so much at the store when they're so cheap online and still really awesome.

Cheers for the article,

Ted

over 2 years ago

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sam smith, optickart opticals at www.optickart.in

hey Matthew,this has been really informative and ice article with ironic words compelling services of offline and online I mostly prefer myself as an online buyer but after recommending my prices and quality and brand names offline.The article you posted is nice and I'm satisfied with the work you're doing

about 1 year ago

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