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Flickr has spotted a new revenue stream via the launch of its camera finder service, which displays the most popular cameras used on the photo sharing site.

Flickr is using the data from photos uploaded to the site to display the most popular makes of cameras and camera phones.

While Flickr says that the data only picks up the make of phone 60% of the time, and camera phones are under-represented, this data will still be of use to consumers and camera manufacturers.

The data for the most popular phones has been linked up with Yahoo Shopping, so if you spot a camera you like, you can get a price comparison. This service only appears to be available in the US at present.

For consumers buying cameras, this part of the service is incredibly useful as, having selected a particular model of camera; you can then browse for photos taken by it to get an idea of its capabilities.

Purists may point out that most images are probably compressed and therefore not representative of a camera’s true capabilities, but there are a number of high resolution images to be found on the site.

The Camera Finder is also useful for finding out how your chosen camera handles colour noise, and how it functions in low light.

It is an excellent new revenue stream, providing the perfect targeted audience for affiliate marketing offers. Yahoo Shopping has an API and is currently beta testing an affiliate scheme, probably along the lines of Kelkoo, which works on a cost per click model (and gives a percentage of click fees to affiliate partners).

Yahoo owns both Flickr and Kelkoo.

Further Reading:
Affiliate Marketing - Roundtable Briefing, February 2006

Graham Charlton

Published 23 November, 2006 by Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton is the former Editor-in-Chief at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter or connect via Linkedin or Google+

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