{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Having taken a look at the Labour and Conservative iPhone apps recently, I have come across an app that is potentially useful for all voters, not just the party faithful. 

The Election 2010 iPhone app is the work of Stuart Sharpe, and it provides a wealth of information about the election. 

On election night next week, the app will provide live results for users as they come in, very handy for those who can't be in front of a TV. There is also an exit poll feature. 

Before then though, the app provides plenty of useful information pulled in from a variety of sources; APIs from the sites YourNextMP and TheyWorkForYou, as well as UK Polling Report and Wikipedia. 

This means that users can find their local constituency, by using the map shown above, using the search box, or else the app will detect your location and give you the nearest constituencies: 

You can then set one as your home seat, and see more, including information about the 2005 result and a list of candidates. 

Clicking on each candidates' name will bring up more information and contact details for the candidates, so you can even phone or email them straight from the app, as well as viewing their Twitter account if they have one.

The app contains this information for all 650 UK parliamentary constituencies, and around 4,000 candidates. 

The information from both the UK Polling Report and Wikipedia, which is provided for each constituency, is a valuable resource, and should be useful for those that want to see previous results for tactical voting purposes. 


This is a well-designed and useful app, which works well and provides a good deal of information for voters. At 59p, it represents good value, and is a lot more useful to the average voter than the party's apps. 

Graham Charlton

Published 29 April, 2010 by Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton is the former Editor-in-Chief at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter or connect via Linkedin or Google+

2565 more posts from this author

Comments (0)

Save or Cancel

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Daily Pulse newsletter. Each weekday, you ll receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.