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A discount voucher intended only for Threshers' suppliers and their friends and family has been downloaded by millions of people, unintentionally proving the power of viral marketing.

The voucher is valid until December 10, and offers a very generous 40% off all wine and champagne at Threshers’ 2,000 UK stores, including Wine Rack, Bottoms Up, Haddows and The Local chains. 

It was reported in The Observer yesterday that other high street stores, including Selfridges, Gap and Oasis, have been emailing discount vouchers to attract customers, offering in-store discounts of up to 40%.

Retail observers believe that the number of coupons being distributed in the run up to Xmas this year is unprecedented.

Threshers' offer was different, as it was intended only to be passed on to a few friends of the recipients. However, once it got onto the web, it took on a life of its own.

One of Threshers' suppliers, South African wine company Stormhoek, said the voucher had been downloaded over 800,000 times from its site.

A spokesman for Threshers told The Times that, though the company had no idea how many vouchers had been downloaded, it was Google’s top hit on Friday.

Further Reading:
Top ten viral marketing mistakes 

Graham Charlton

Published 4 December, 2006 by Graham Charlton

Graham Charlton is the former Editor-in-Chief at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter or connect via Linkedin or Google+

2565 more posts from this author

Comments (1)

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orangesarahpc

It's a con, the normal deal on 342 is 35% so its no big deal- most of us sussed this out last year when the same stories were spread as a marketing gimmick.

over 8 years ago

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