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I was recently trying to put together some examples of good landing page design and found there was a lack of blog posts looking at physical products in particular.

There are lots of blog posts about designing effective landing pages, and case studies of websites that are doing it right, but nearly all of the examples given were of landing pages for software or service products.

Yes, you can apply many of the same principles and tactics, but still, it’d be nice to have some examples of physical products being sold. 

While nearly every ecommerce store sells physical products, I was looking for those one-page, mega converting landing pages, probably selling only one product, and doing that as well as possible.

Even this poor old Quora question has gone unanswered for far too long: What are some good examples of landing pages for physical products? I shall be posting an answer to that question once this blog post goes live. 

While researching this post I looked at between 200-300 different products, and while there were many good examples, the vast majority of them followed the same template.

There was a distinct lack of landing pages trying to do something different; perhaps for fear of straying too far from the accepted model of landing page design?

So for this blog post I have decided to pick out three examples which I felt stood out from the rest and were distinctive. Even if you removed the branding, these pages are unmistakably unique. 

But, so you feel like you’re getting your money’s (or rather attention’s) worth, I have included a list of other examples I found which had many good features, but didn’t necessarily break the mold.

Hopefully, by reading this post, you will have a host of great examples to refer to next time you’re designing a landing page for a physical product. 

Three examples that are doing something different

Google Nexus 

I’m going to start with a company who are getting very good at landing page design: Google, with the Nexus phones and tablets. The Nexus landing page is a big, full screen design that manages to make an impact while being incredibly minimal.

Clicking the “watch video” button causes the other UI elements to disappear and a full screen video begins to play - one of the best examples of making a feature of video I’ve seen on a landing page. 

You can then choose either the 'Phones' or 'Tablets' option from the bottom of the screen to be whisked off to a separate landing page focused on one of those two product types. 

The new landing page is similarly minimal, using lots of white space, and explains the core benefits as you scroll down the page. Overall, it’s an incredibly classy-feeling experience, and I’ve come to expect nothing less from Google.

As an aside, if you want to see what Google would do with an infographic, check out this one from earlier this year: How Search Works

Nest

Nest is a 'next generation thermostat' that is supposed to save you energy by programming itself, as well as by many other high-tech functions.

What makes this landing page interesting is that it tells a story, and one that's interactive at times too. Scrolling down the page shows you “365 days with Nest”, showing you how the product learns over time while teaching you its features as well. 

I love how at certain parts of the journey it will play a short video to demonstrate its features, and the little interactive elements like being able to change the time on the thermostat to see how its temperature settings change, is a neat touch.

The site hasn’t been optimised for mobiles, but at least its not completely broken.

Garmin Fenix

This is another example of a landing page that really tells a story. The first thing you’ll notice upon hitting the site is that it doesn’t scroll down - it scrolls upwards.

Far from being different for the sake of it, there is a good reason for this. Scrolling all the way to the top shows you someone’s journey to the top of a mountain, using various checkpoints along the route to stop and describe features, or show you videos. 

And the videos are really great too; they show you a number of different personas, such as The Trekker, or The Alpinist, shot like little documentaries. What’s quite odd is that the site isn’t mobile friendly, and yet shows a different version of the page on my iPhone than on my Mac, with bits of the text cut off at the sides.

Bit of a shame, because the page on my mobile almost looked alright if it wasn’t for the unfortunate cropping.  

Five more examples showing off good design  

Playstation 4

The landing page for the Playstation 4 uses a nice clean design, and shows off various other resources that customers can use to base their purchasing decision on (like videos, and the game selection).

While it’s best not to link out too much on a landing page, buying a Playstation 4 is a big decision and you need suitably convincing to buy this instead of an Xbox One. 

Jawbone Up 

The fitness focused wristband UP has a landing page that ticks all the boxes for a modern landing page design.. Parallax scrolling? Check. Sticky menu? Check. Product video? Check.

I’m not fond of the top slider though. It requires being manually switched through, and on a large monitor this places the arrows way off to the sides and it’s more likely people will simply scroll down, missing whatever messaging there was to show off in subsequent slides.   

Recon Jet

Thought Google Glass was an isolated innovation? Think again. The Recon Jet is a similar wearable computer, and its landing page is of the classic long sales letter type. I really like that the product video is given a centre stage by being playable directly from the top of the page (below the logo).

They are also sure to provide links to media sites who mention the Recon Jet - although, I think it would be more effective to provide a snippet of text as a quote instead of linking to the website as it gives customers information they need without them needing to leave the site.  

Marshall Hanwell

This page for a Marshall amplifier places the product in the focus of attention, with a massive full-screen image showing off its design. It’s enough to connect with the customer on an emotional level as

I’m sure many musicians would see that picture and immediately want to plug in a guitar. Also unique to this site, there is a price and add to cart icon on the right hand side that follows you down the page, but when you get as far as the reviews it disappears.

I rather like this as it feels less like they’re thrusting a call to action in your face. 

Withings Pulse

Another pleasing and clean landing page, Pulse is a fitness monitor which monitors your movement, measures your pulse, and everything else you’d expect.

Also, this page borrows many of the same features (if not all) from the other fitness product on this list, the UP: parallax scrolling, a sticky menu, product video... I found the percentage dial near the bottom of the page a bit odd though; as you scroll down, the dial fills up from 0% to 100%, presumably a metaphor for reaching your goals.

But for a time, I just assumed it was a loader for a video that wasn’t downloading properly as it appeared to be stuck on around 96%. The idea doesn’t really do it for me.  

Important points to pull out from these examples

I thought it’d be nice to end this post with four observations which jump out at me after going through these examples one more time.

  • While I have chosen examples which are very pretty, don’t go for beauty over substance. The most important thing about your landing page is that it converts; if making it pretty sacrifices some of its ability to do this, then you need to re-prioritize your aims. 
  • Don’t make it hard to buy your product! I have visited many examples in this little journey of discovery where I had to actually work to find the core call-to-action button. That small amount of thinking time is long enough for someone to change their mind. 
  • Use video. Video engages the viewer so much more than a picture with some accompanying text can, so use it to show off your product. This is particularly true for physical products where you cannot see the product in action from a web browser - show the customer what they’re buying and try to evoke all of the sensations that come with holding and using a physical product. 
  • Tell a story or journey if it’s appropriate. I loved how with the Nest and Garmin Fenix above that as you scrolled, a journey was shared with you. It wasn’t just a list of features and benefits, and it engaged me so much more. Whether it made me want to buy the product more is another question however... 

Are there any other examples that you’d add to this list? Or, are there any examples on this list that you’d get rid of? I’d love to know in the comments.

Peter Meinertzhagen

Published 29 July, 2013 by Peter Meinertzhagen

Peter Meinertzhagen is Digital Marketing Manager at Nominet and a contributor to Econsultancy. You can follow Peter on Google+, Twitter and LinkedIn

8 more posts from this author

Comments (21)

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Laura Phillips

Laura Phillips, Digital Marketing Executive at Koozai

Hi Peter,

Great post! I love the simplicity of the Marshall ad, and as a Marshall owner I have to agree, it's like showing a child a big sweetie in the middle of the screen, it catches the attention and gets users wanting!

It is a fine line between a beautiful, functional site, and one that is so simplistic it is hard to operate and inevitably less successful, you have some great examples here.

about 3 years ago

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Rebecca Caroe

I agree that Marshall's page is within the reach of most brands reading this. Its classic layout and the alternating black/white background help with scrolling down a long page. Strong copy and a great call to action.

Thanks

about 3 years ago

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gonzalo

Well I agree with Marshall page, but the product it's not for pluggin a guitar ;-) but and I phone

about 3 years ago

Peter Meinertzhagen

Peter Meinertzhagen, Digital Marketing Manager at Zest Digital

@Laura Hi Laura, thanks very much! I definitely found the Marshall page to connect with me like you say - showing a child a big sweet. I don't know if that's just my love of music though :)

@Rebecca Seems that the Marshall page resonated with people. I agree, it's a lovely format for a landing page.

@Gonzalo Must admit, I had my suspicions! I presume it's for other stuff like mics then. Still - looks good :)

about 3 years ago

Peter Meinertzhagen

Peter Meinertzhagen, Digital Marketing Manager at Zest Digital

@Laura Hi Laura, thanks very much! I definitely found the Marshall page to connect with me like you say - showing a child a big sweet. I don't know if that's just my love of music though :)

@Rebecca Seems that the Marshall page resonated with people. I agree, it's a lovely format for a landing page.

@Gonzalo Must admit, I had my suspicions! I presume it's for other stuff like mics then. Still - looks good :)

about 3 years ago

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Krupa Patel

Thanks for this post- it's come at the right time. I'm working on a landing page project and have been researching to find out all I can. What I find is that the focus is on conversion and technical details (which of course is vital) but less on creating that initial impact and attraction for someone not yet ready to make that decision. All of these are beautiful and unique examples.

about 3 years ago

Peter Meinertzhagen

Peter Meinertzhagen, Digital Marketing Manager at Zest Digital

@Krupa Hi Krupa, thanks! I'm glad that you'll find these examples useful for your project, as ultimately that's why I put them together.

about 3 years ago

dan barker

dan barker, E-Business Consultant at Dan Barker

Great post, Peter,

Here's another great one to add to the list: http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/uk/products/blackmagicpocketcinemacamera

dan

about 3 years ago

Peter Meinertzhagen

Peter Meinertzhagen, Digital Marketing Manager at Zest Digital

@Dan Hey Dan, thanks! I like the example you linked, a nice, clean, pleasing design. Although, I think they might benefit from a more prominent call to action, particularly at the bottom of the page. Currently, it says "shipping July", suggesting you can't really perform any action besides learning more about it. A CTA at the bottom going to where it will be stocked or perhaps the option to sign up to a mailing list to receive updates would be nice.

about 3 years ago

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Therecanbonly1

Great Post. One question though... as an eCommerce site, are you suggesting that the best product page design for customer purchase is to essentially look like a magazine ad? Each of the examples, while very pretty, reminded me of leafing through a magazine. I'm not suggesting that there is anything wrong with that; just wondering if that is the best layout at point of purchase, or more for initial interest. Magazine ads are generally designed to capture attention for future purchase. Product pages CAN mimic this; but the idea is to get them to purchase now. I agree that most eCommerce sites look pretty much the same; but I would like to try something a bit different for mine; but needs to be scalable as well.

about 3 years ago

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Kathryn Braid, Content writer and Marketing Intern at Userfarm

Hi, great article. I really liked the Garmin Fenix concept, incorporating the metaphor for climbing to success into the actual website design. I also agree that video is a fantastic way to grab attention on a landing page, it can be quick, pretty and informational which I think is what you're going for here. I also read that when writing content for a webpage companies found they had more success in converting visitors if the site told a story, and not even necessarily a story related to the webpage! A very nice selection of very different pages.

Kathryn

about 3 years ago

Richard Allan

Richard Allan, Senior Digital Marketing Executive at Aberdeen Asset Management

I do like the Nexus page. Found myself scrolling up and down mesmerised by it's smoothness for at least 5 minutes!

about 3 years ago

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Pip Ward

These are great examples although it does make it easier when you have a small number of similar products. Trying to find a template that works well for the thousands of products in a department store from TVs to t-shirts is a lot harder. Perhaps that's why so many websites stick to a safe option.

about 3 years ago

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Kylie

Hi,
Really interesting landing pages, would love to see some examples from B2B sites.
Thanks
@ExperianMktg

about 3 years ago

Peter Meinertzhagen

Peter Meinertzhagen, Digital Marketing Manager at Zest Digital

@Therecanbonly1 Thanks! Unfortunately, it isn't quite the same for a large ecommerce website. Like you say, it needs to be scalable, and needs to accommodate a much larger amount of products.

The Marshall site for example, is a multiple product ecommerce site, but has a very small amount of products. It manages to use this sort of design.

All of these examples are supposed to generate an action, but these are the sort of products where you buy immediately without thought and research... so in a way, yes, they use a similar mindset to magazine ads, but you ultimately want the user to buy there and then.

@Kathryn Cheers Kathryn. I totally agree with telling a story - it's one of the things great copywriting does to engage people. And if you can translate that principle to not just the copy, but the design and user experience, then even better.

@Richard Haha, totally. It reeks of quality.

@Pip As I said above, it is a different matter with huge ecommerce websites. I tried to focus solely on landing pages that are centred on selling one product, or very small ecommerce sites.

@Kylie Thanks. B2B service landing pages would be an interesting topic, watch this space ;-)

about 3 years ago

Anna Lewis

Anna Lewis, Google Analytics Analyst at Koozai

It is great to see so many fantastic examples of dedicated landing pages for products despite previous posts mainly on services landing pages. It is understandable to be that way round, given than most websites that sell physical products often sell more products than is feasible to create dedicated landing pages for, which is a shame but I guess they're going for quantity over quality and those with one product are able to put the time in to make quality landing pages.

These examples definitely show the signs of good landing pages - I'm drawn in and interested to see more about all of these products even though I would never have thought to look at or buy any of them!

about 3 years ago

Peter Meinertzhagen

Peter Meinertzhagen, Digital Marketing Manager at Zest Digital

@Anna Hi Anna, thanks! It is understandable considering the size of most ecommerce sites, the landing page approach simply isn't scalable. The quality of drawing you in is what attracted me to the majority of these pages; on the standard ecommerce website, I'll probably not spend a great deal of time looking at a product I hadn't intended on buying, but these sucked me in.

about 3 years ago

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Jack Jarvis, Owner at The Website Review Company

@ Anna - I agree that for most ecommerce site this isn't possible, but most ecommerce sites probably have a 80:20 ratio where 80% of sales come from 20% of products.

In this case, the site should test a template the increases conversion and roll this out across key ranges.

about 3 years ago

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Average user

Interesting examples, and certainly the design looks good in many of the cases. While reading the article, I was thinking - do these pages provide a short and simple path to actually buying the product?

I tried the Google Nexus page. Ok, I'm at work, using our standard browser - yes it's IE, sorry! - the site doesn't work, but since I really want to buy their product I'll change to my illegal version of Chrome. Link copy-pasted, here we go. I try clicking on the image, nothing happens. Suddenly the whole screen starts playing a video that I can't follow, it's running somehow too fast, flickering. But I like the innocent hint to puppy love, it makes the product look good and most importantly simple to use.

Now where do I go to buy this thing? I guess I need to choose between Phones and Tablets - can't see other options. But I don't want all tablets, just the one the boy is holding. Which one is it? I'm clicking on whatever option feels most attractive. Explore. Buy now. Page autoscrolls downwards - yes, I select the 32GB and Buy now. What now? "Sorry! Devices on Google Play is not available in your country yet. We're working to bring devices to more countries as quickly as possible. Please check back again soon." Deception.

I love Google and what they do, but these recent times they seem to have forgotten something.

about 3 years ago

Mike  Darnell

Mike Darnell, Social Marketing at Treepodia Ecommerce Video Solution

The nexus video is sensational, simple, creative and compelling. The best part is, I watch the video and then I'm three clicks away from purchase. Absolutely great example of how the simplest of things really are the most powerful.

I never really thought about purchasing a nexus, but hmm maybe I will now :)

about 3 years ago

Mrinal Mahanti

Mrinal Mahanti, Landing page designer at http://www.buylandingpagedesign.com/

We do custom and pre-made digital product landing page design as per your custom requirement. You can found electronics, digital product landing page design on my pre-made landing page design collection. Feel free to browse them and contact through site for any query or suggestion.

almost 3 years ago

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