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Mobile apps and responsive websites are looking - and working - better than ever, as designers come to terms with the parameters involved. Smaller screens, it seems, do not necessarily make for poorer experiences. 

If anything, the restrictions of mobile devices are focusing the minds of designers, which is always a good thing. It seems to me that the very best designs really stand out, and do a great job of understanding user behaviour on smaller devices.

I have collected a bunch of examples which go some way towards proving that mobile websites and apps can really look the part, while communicating functionality clearly. In most cases the screenshots link to portfolios, so do click on them.

I haven’t tested all of these apps, not least because a few of them are design concepts, but I think they all show that mobile design can be very, very pretty indeed. If the user experience mirrors design (and it doesn’t always!) then presumably these would all work well.

Blue

This weather forecasting app uses minimal design - primarily coloured bars - to reflect the conditions outside. Simple, and lovely.

 

SnelTrein

A truly stunning interface for a journey planner app, by Netherlands-based Aldert Greydanus.

 

Task

A conceptual (and flat) design for a calendar app. Needs a little more contrast perhaps, where the beige bar is.

 

Lightbridge Projects

A great use of coloured bars and iconography on this productivity app. 

Clyp

I love Riccardo Carlet’s designs for Clyp, which has a gorgeous colour palette and uses shading really well. 

 

There are lots of very smart UI touches too, as this gif shows...

Ski Buddy

A rather pretty app for those who love to move downhill at pace. 

Snowbird

Here's another clean-looking design that may be appreciated by winter sports aficionados.

 

Smart Home

Numbers aside, there is a total absence of visible text on Eyal Zuri’s design for this Smart Home app. Icontastic!

Medical Dashboard

Anton Aheichanlka favours a clean, minimalist approach for this dashboard widget.

Qatar Airways Flight App

This redesign for Qatar Airways is just about the prettiest travel-related app I think I’ve ever seen. Bravo!

SEO Monitoring App

They said SEO wasn’t pretty. They lied. Here’s a design concept for an SEO app, which should help the job-seeking Dawid Tcokz get hired. 

Kipcall

Here is a collection of gorgeous screenshots and desktop icons for this mobile chat app.

Ideas In Digital

The mobile screenshot of this agency’s responsive website.

Semear

Another good-looking weather app, by Gustavo Balestraci.

Repapp

Emrah Gencer has created a clean UI for this app.

BBC Sport

The BBC's digital team continues to impress, and the recent update to its mobile product is well-designed and therefore very easy to use.

What do you think? Seen any others? Be sure to leave a comment below!

Our Festival of Marketing event in November is a two day celebration of the modern marketing industry, featuring speakers from brands including LEGO, Tesco, Barclays, FT.com and more. 

Chris Lake

Published 11 September, 2013 by Chris Lake

Chris Lake is CEO at EmpiricalProof, and former Director of Content at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter, Google+ or connect via Linkedin.

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Stuart McMillan

Stuart McMillan, Deputy Head of Ecommerce at Schuh

Wow, app tastic!

When will we see econsultancy rolling out a beautiful mobile experience?

Word on the street says that mobiles are here to stay... ;)

over 2 years ago

Ian Creek

Ian Creek, Marketing Director at Rokk Media

Great collection Chris.

Iconography is rarely given the time it deserves. I'm really pleased to see so many great examples all on one page. Mobile is definitely pushing designers forward and as a result we're seeing lots of new and creative approaches to design, which is in turn pushing web design forward too. These are exciting times!

Thanks for sharing these!

over 2 years ago

Chris Lake

Chris Lake, CEO at Empirical Proof

@Stuart - It's been on the to-do list for years! We're going down the responsive route (actually, our Festival Of Marketing site is responsive: http://festivalofmarketing.com). Hopefully by the end of the year. How are you doing on the mobile front?

@Ian - Thanks Ian. There are tons of others out there. You can lose yourself for hours in the likes of Dribbble and Behance!

over 2 years ago

Stuart McMillan

Stuart McMillan, Deputy Head of Ecommerce at Schuh

@Chris m.schuh.co.uk is highly effective, although perhaps not the prettiest. Around a third of our traffic comes from mobiles, so it's pretty important to us.

That being said, we're in the process of going responsive, launching a pilot site this side of Christmas and then the main Schuh site in the spring, removing the need for our current desktop, mobile & tablet sites. Really looking forward to it being live.

over 2 years ago

Chris Lake

Chris Lake, CEO at Empirical Proof

@Stuart - Nice one, you'll have to take lots of before and after screenshots and we can do a write up somewhere down the line. A third of all traffic is a huge number! Would love to discuss metrics!

over 2 years ago

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Josh Trenser

That SnelTrein design, FABULOUS!!!

over 2 years ago

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Peter

Is the Lightbridge app available? Looks great!

over 2 years ago

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Becs Rivett

Wow, they look really good. Massive fashion for flat ui and cards. I fear though that in a few years we'll look back at these and say "that's so 2013"

over 2 years ago

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Dr RWP

Some good examples Chris. IMO it's always been important to design for different browsing environments, and the concept of "responsive" web design and cross device compatibility is actually as old as the web itself !

over 2 years ago

Jonathan Bass

Jonathan Bass, Managing Director at Incentivated Ltd

@Chris ... Great selection - well curated. These show-up most traditional businesses, which rarely think 'mobile-first' (it's easier to start from scratch of course). However are the examples mostly apps? Only IID looks like a responsive site, and it's brochureware so relatively easy to do responsively. Responsive sites are rarely 'made-for-mobile' (you can normally tell a mile off) and as Dr RWP says "[it's] as old as the web". 'Adaptive' produces a better result for complicated sites; smartphones, as opposed to tablets, need their own template if you are going to really make the GUI work for you, add mobile-specific functionality and limit the payload over cellular. Take the BBC Sport site (not app) - what you get on mobile is not what you see on desktop, and the result is superb. That's not to detract from these great examples, as I believe most are apps and all excellent. Well found, as ever.

over 2 years ago

Matt Naughton

Matt Naughton, Head of Digital Marketing at Lights4fun

@Stuart - good to hear big brands are realising the m.**** website is now dead. Responsive all the way.
@Chris - I always follow your posts and took some inspiration from you for developing our new responsive css for Lights4fun.co.uk. We launched yesterday and it's 99% there - just a few JS issues this morning which cropped up. I'd appreciate any comments you have (starting next week!).

In relation to your article, beautiful examples - the ones which work well look to be apps rather than responsive sites. It would be great to see a collection of killer responsive websites for 2014 which take into account design but also conversion.

over 2 years ago

Jonathan Bass

Jonathan Bass, Managing Director at Incentivated Ltd

@Matt ... 'm.' is a red herring. This is simply used when a different back-end is delivering the solution, for practical/legacy reasons e.g. transcoding as quick route to market for complicated systems with long lead-times for re-platforming, rather than say simple brochureware. An 'Adaptive' site - with a made-for-smartphone template alongside the desktop/tablet one - can be served through the www. and is what BBC, Google, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook do. There is a huge misconception going on here; responsive is not what the 'big guys' in fact do. It's an entry-level solution/one for SMEs IF you can re-platform, just like transcoding/serving through the m. is a short-cut for massive sites. The consumer does not care about a re-direct to m. and it has no effect on your SEO. Responsive = good, Adaptive is better (in terms of UX). Responsive needs only front-end effort, Adaptive requires both front-end and back-end, so produces the best result but of course costs more. If only life were so simple ...

over 2 years ago

Alice Morgan

Alice Morgan, Freelance digital marketing consultant at Freelance

We just launched our new RWD site for Chevrolet Germany - www.chevrolet.de. Rolling all the other markets out in the next few weeks.

over 2 years ago

Matt Naughton

Matt Naughton, Head of Digital Marketing at Lights4fun

@Jonathan, get what you're saying totally. My angle is an SME running 1 back end on a budget.

over 2 years ago

Josh Gill

Josh Gill, Digital Marketing Executive at Mediademon

Some top-notch examples here, I've been really into the BBC Sport app recently, actually told Sky Sports to move over - the UI is so intuitive and easy to use. Also, definitely going to give the Blue weather app a go! Nice to see a creative concept to go with stunning mobile app design.

We're currently trying to educate business owners on the benefits of mobile-optimisation - we've been blogging about it at http://www.mediademon.com/why-website-need-be-mobile-friendly/

over 2 years ago

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Sam

We're in the process of designing a mobile site, and these examples are wonderful inspirational tools! More examples are always appreciated - so keep it up!

over 2 years ago

Stuart McMillan

Stuart McMillan, Deputy Head of Ecommerce at Schuh

@Jonathan, adaptive is not the solution Google recommend, responsive is, so that is the route we have taken.

If you do responsive right, from mobile-first approach, it is the simplest and easiest solution for most businesses, especially ecommerce.

Perhaps a different story if you are the BBC. I accept that it is easier to conceptually think about different templates for different devices, but that a fluid layout with selected media-query driven stylistic changes can produce a more consistent user experience.

over 2 years ago

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Paul

With mobile RWD has its place but I also think that a slimmed down version of your site just targeting the key tasks / subject areas is also a valid option.

Users on mobile devices have different priorities to those viewing on an ipad/desktop.

They are usually time sensitive and removing a lot of the noise from the desktop version onto a dedicated mobile version makes good business sense.

over 2 years ago

Stuart McMillan

Stuart McMillan, Deputy Head of Ecommerce at Schuh

@Paul, I actually think that removing noise from the desktop site is good too, there is lots of good UX evidence that shows that a simpler UI is good for conversion as there is less chance for customer confusion or choice paralysis.

over 2 years ago

Jonathan Bass

Jonathan Bass, Managing Director at Incentivated Ltd

@stuart - funny that Google does not do for itself what it recommends! In fact, really they are suggesting it as an SME solution; it's in their interest for the long tail to mobilise. No big business does what Google recommends, because the UX is not as good as can be achieved with both responsive (client side) plus adaptive (server-side i.e. RESS) code. Everyone who builds client-side only responsive sites which are more than brochureware ends up realising that it works great on PCs and tablets but is poor on mobile. But budgets are limited, of course. Mcommerce check-out is a case in point. Fluid design, by definition, just moves things around - whereas real people use smartphones in a way that is different from how they use their PC and want other functionality. Sometimes, as @Paul says, you want to slim it down for the mobile user (why send megabytes over GPRS/3G when the device hides it, better that the server does the work), sometimes you want special mobile functionality e.g. take photo and submit, real location aware stuff. If only 'one size fitted all' ...

over 2 years ago

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Ed Richardson

Great selection of mobile UI's here, well curated Chris.

The sense is that mobile design is forcing people to think much more about the UI being fit for purpose, which felt was too often not the case with desktop. Perhaps is the change of interaction to touch screen feels a bigger leap than a mouse, or maybe we've all just got a better grasp at the task at hand now. That said I'm sure it's just the practitioners, I've seen some bad mobile specific UI's as well, it just feels not as many as desktop.

Nice debate on the benefits/merits of adaptive to responsive. Responsive was a revolution that needed to happen, but at the end of the day mobile user needs are often going to be different to those of desktop user.

The grey area is going to be your tablet user sitting at home on the sofa doing tasks that might have "traditionally" be completed on a desktop being served an adaptive mobile version. But truly adaptive sites can address this.

Cheers Chris.

over 2 years ago

Stuart McMillan

Stuart McMillan, Deputy Head of Ecommerce at Schuh

@jonathan I really don't disagree with what you're saying, it just feels like a very desktop-first point of view. We're a busy ecommerce site, and less than half of our traffic comes from desktops. I guess everyone's point of view will depend on their own traffic mix and predictions.

I can see a time in the next year where desktops will only account for a third of our traffic, and tablets will be more of an on-the go device and so will have mobile demand placed on them.

I can see the benefit of adaptive design for a media-rich site, but we are an ecommerce business who wants to trade as effectively as possible, as simply as possible. I will only complicate our sites as much as I have to in order to get the sale. If adaptive works for your business then more power to you, I just think it's an unnecessary complication for our needs.

over 2 years ago

Chris Lake

Chris Lake, CEO at Empirical Proof

Some great comments here and much to discuss. The responsive vs adaptive debate is definitely something I shall explore in more detail. Personally I favour the latter, as ultimately it's all about the user experience, and mobile users often behave very differently. There are no fixed rules of course - Stuart is bang on in this respect. Horses for courses!

over 2 years ago

Sibbs Singh

Sibbs Singh, Digital Strategist at Pancentric Digital

Some great examples of design here. Will be interesting to see how the functionality fares behind these builds.

@Stuart would be interested to know how you are managing your responsive build and integrating with ecommerce back-end. We are currently building a new fully responsive and integrated site here at Silverstone.

over 2 years ago

Jonathan Bass

Jonathan Bass, Managing Director at Incentivated Ltd

@Stuart ... but you seem to be using adaptive. I get re-directed to m.schuh.co.uk (with a nice low bandwidth page size, for cellular, of only 179k). Your mobile site is great, but it's not a simple fluid grid. You are using, unless I am wrong, two templates - each may be responsive within itself, hopefully - one for smartphone and one for desktop/tablet. Ps, if as I believe you are building in-house then you could serve your smartphone template from your www. as well, as Google recommends, but it won't actually generate an extra ROI (see earlier points). Maybe we're all talking the same sense but the terminology is poorly defined. Anyway, love your site on mobile - it works and looks good (style and substance).

over 2 years ago

Elliot Ross

Elliot Ross, Email marketing design at actionrocket.co

good debate!

quick note for clarity - the term 'adaptive' can also mean something else in mobile web design.

If you think of a responsive design as always being 100% wide, with the layout changing accordingly at various break points, adaptive is a bit more rigid, using set widths instead. So for example, an adaptive site would be 320px wide for anyone with a screen size of less than 600px, then you'd have a breakpoint there for anyone with a screen size less than 900px etc.

a slightly different technique to what is being labeled 'adaptive' here, which is using multiple sites (eg. m dot) vs one site that changes formatting

over 2 years ago

Chris Lake

Chris Lake, CEO at Empirical Proof

Thanks Elliot. Certainly it would be good to absolutely nail down the terminology, and to clarify the differences.

over 2 years ago

Stuart McMillan

Stuart McMillan, Deputy Head of Ecommerce at Schuh

@Jonathan, thanks for that, we've worked hard on it. The 3 sites (there is a tablet one) are separate, we're working towards a responsive site that takes the very best from all three.

Sat on one of my browser tabs is the first internal test of our pilot responsive site homepage. I'm really pleased with it so far.

I'll be talking about it at Conversion Conference in October, if you'd like to hear more.

@Sibbs, I'll DM you through linkedin

over 2 years ago

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Chris Ferdinandi

@Paul - You wrote: "Users on mobile devices have different priorities to those viewing on an ipad/desktop."

Unfortunately, this perspective, known as "mobile context," has been shown repeatedly to not actually be true. A report by Google and Nielsen earlier this year found that 77% of mobile searches happen in locations where you would expect a desktop device to also exist–at home and in the office (source: http://www.google.com/think/research-studies/creating-moments-that-matter.html).

Design firm Yiibu point out that mobile users aren’t always just looking for information. They’re also reading while commuting, entertaining themselves while they wait in line, or browsing the web while watching TV. (source: http://www.slideshare.net/yiibu/the-trouble-with-context)

In her A List Apart article, Karen McGrane cites another Google study that shows that 90% of people start a task on one device and continue it on another. Same task, multiple devices. (source: http://alistapart.com/column/windows-on-the-web)

My point? You can't infer intent just from the size of someone's screen, which makes stripped down mobile sites fundamentally flawed. People demand content parity. That means that good information architecture and ease in finding the information you want are more important than ever. And to Stuart's point, many (scratch that, most) desktop sites would benefit from less crap and bloat, too (this one included).

over 2 years ago

Chris Lake

Chris Lake, CEO at Empirical Proof

@Chris - Good pointers. It is what makes life difficult for designers.

I totally agree on your bloat point too - we are in the process of a big overhaul, as there is much wrong with our own UX.

over 2 years ago

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Chris Ferdinandi

@Chris - In retrospect, that was probably a low blow, so sorry if I offended you guys at all!

To better articulate what I meant: I'm here to read an article, but there's a lot of stuff that's trying to pull my attention away from that. Social links that follow me around the page. Ads. Job postings. Other articles. Interesting comments. More ads. Blinking! Flashing!

Glad to hear you guys are working on. Can't wait to see what the finished product looks like.

over 2 years ago

Chris Lake

Chris Lake, CEO at Empirical Proof

@Chris - Not at all, it's all fat for the fire! Too much blinking flashing shit is one of my pet hates, and hopefully this will all get sorted out soon.

over 2 years ago

James Gurd

James Gurd, Owner at Digital JugglerSmall Business Multi-user

Afternoon all,

I'm loving the responsive vs. adaptive vs. mobile optimised debate, a nice by-product of your blog Chris.

I think saying 1 is better than the others actually misses the point and is the wrong way to look at it. Start with understanding and defining customer needs first based on browsing data + usability studies. Work out what they're doing, when, why, how & where there are links with other devices. Only then can you get a good picture of what mobile means in the context of your business.

One you've nailed down that understanding, you can look at the tech solution. Perhaps it's purely responsive you need, great. But perhaps you actually do need an adaptive solution that caters for device specific behaviour. For example, i've found for some retailers the behaviour on Android varies to iOS. In such cases, a generic responsive design misses the boat.

Plus, in my opinion a common misconception is that responsive and adaptive are divorced. My understanding for discussing this with several developers is that you can build a fluid responsive code base and then make it adaptive. The advantage of the responsive approach is a single code base to manage which reduces complexity and cost of maintenance, hugely appealing to ecommerce teams.

Chris - it would be great to get a meet-up sorted to thrash out the tech/commercial implications of responsive/adaptive/mobile optimised. Any appetite at Econsultancy to get the wheels in motion - i'm thinking an informal mash-up soiree with panel discussion & audience input. It's a topic that is critical to the future of ecommerce yet there is lots of uncertainty and crossed wires (me probably included!).

cheers
james

over 2 years ago

Jonathan Bass

Jonathan Bass, Managing Director at Incentivated Ltd

@ChrisF ... you are right in that 77% are doing the same. But your implication is wrong, IMHO. The 23% who are doing things differently are precisely why mobile is not the same as desktop. If optimisation is valuable for much smaller segments then it's even more so for a quarter of the audience. The RoI potential of handling this difference is huge for anything but an SME. Plus just because I search for the same term does mean I want the same result (context). Searching for an airport from afar and before my flight might be about booking car-parking, but if I'm en-route or there already it might be to find out about where the gate is or my duty-free allowance; we can guess/optimise the journeys. There are many such examples where mobile is not delivering the same end-result; in retail (a recent econsultancy article said) you should drop all the upsells and add PayPal. You can't (shouldn't) do that with some CSS media queries.

@Elliot ... adaptive where the cut-off is say 320px is compatible with an m. approach, i.e. serve one template one side of the cut-off and another the other side, possibly from a different architecture if adding smartphone support to a legacy system. These terms are not really helpful unless one adds detail. Personally I think RWD is a lot more than fluid design but most people think that's it. Ditto adaptive doesn't say how you are adapting and whether FE or BE tech!

@Stuart ... just make sure that your new responsive site does not deliver 1MB of content to smartphones (which are mostly on cellular), compared with your present 172KB, or the UX will go down hill. So many 'responsive' sites suffer massive 'inertia'. What does everyone say; "if a page does not load in 7s you've lost the customer" (your m. home page takes 10s now, on 3G, and 46s on GPRS when I'm on a train ... 1MB and I'll be off to Clarks/ASOS/Office instead!).

But this all comes down to budget! There is no right answer, only complexity ... and that's why salaries are high in digital. Aren't we all lucky.

over 2 years ago

Jonathan Bass

Jonathan Bass, Managing Director at Incentivated Ltd

@James ... you've hit the nail on the head. Start at the beginning, with the consumer/your biz reqs.

BUT you can have your cake and eat it. If budget (both dev and maintenance) permits then a responsive smartphone template with a responsive tablet/desktop one - i.e. adapting between the two as the 'big guys' do, both from the www. - will give you the best UX and so ROI. But the initial outlay is going to be 10-15% more.

That's called RESS. RESS and RCSS together are [best practice] RWD. Note 'best' - doesn't mean that RCSS alone isn't 'good'. It's about building tech on-top of other tech as far as your budget allows.

over 2 years ago

Stuart McMillan

Stuart McMillan, Deputy Head of Ecommerce at Schuh

@Jonathan, it'll be faster than the existing mobile site, with exactly the same HTML (3.9Kb) as the desktop site. Afterall, HTML is for only for semantically marking up content and as we will have feature parity and a consistent user experience the content should be the same. CSS will then give priority to different features dependant on screen size using a number of breakpoints, with fluidity between them.

That's just for launch, it will then give us an excellent starting point to refine further. Hopefully one of the advantages of a single template.

If it's not in the upper quartile for ecommerce sites page speed, I'll eat my hat.

over 2 years ago

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Chris Ferdinandi

"Work out what they're doing, when, why, how & where there are links with other devices."

My only concern with that type of approach—you may end up making some false correlations. When I redesigned http://pawsnewengland.com, we found that people weren't doing much their from mobile devices. That data could have led us to say, "We don't need a responsive site."

Since going responsive, though, traffic from mobile sites has increased by 4x. People are browsing lists of available dogs, submitting applications and more. The more I observe people on mobile devices, the more I believe that people will try to do anything they need to get done from their phones.

"a common misconception is that responsive and adaptive are divorced."

Thank you for bringing this up! The two are NOT mutually exclusive, and when used in conjunction, make a much more powerful pair. Luke Wroblewski calls this RESS (Responsive + Server Side).

over 2 years ago

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Chris Ferdinandi

@Jonathan -

"you are right in that 77% are doing the same. But your implication is wrong, IMHO. The 23% who are doing things differently are precisely why mobile is not the same as desktop. If optimisation is valuable for much smaller segments then it's even more so for a quarter of the audience."

Two quick thoughts on that:

1. That number has been growing for the last two years. Based on the behaviors I observe, I see it increasing still, not staying static. The web is everywhere, and we can't stop it.

2. You have no way of knowing, based on the size of device, what the person is there to do. You could ASSUME they only want directions or a phone number or what not, but your chances of being wrong are very high.

For me, the direction seems clear:

1. Adaptive design and progressive enhancement (not CONTENT) so that you're serving appropriate and appropriately sized resources based on the device and it's limitations or capabilities.

2. Fluid layouts that provide the same content to everyone.

3. A focus on performance as a key design feature—whether the person is on a desktop, smartphone, refrigerator, TV, or whatever.

4. REALLY strong information architecture. Identify common use cases and workflows, and make it easy for the visitors themselves to find the content that fits THEIR desires.

Point number 4 may be the most important. It's arrogant to assume that we as designers and developers can know exactly what a person wants from our site. Our job should be to make it easy for them to get where they want to go.

over 2 years ago

Stuart McMillan

Stuart McMillan, Deputy Head of Ecommerce at Schuh

@Chris, I have to agree with that 100%!

This is exactly the philosophy we're adopting with the new site. I guess there are two aspects to it:

1) responsive relaunch to give the users a better experience

but more importantly

2) to give us a great sprint board to concentrate on evolving the user experience, especially your points 3 & 4

the relaunch is not a fait accompli, it's just a step up on our journey.

over 2 years ago

Chris Lake

Chris Lake, CEO at Empirical Proof

@James - I'll fire over an email and include a few people. Certainly something that we should do more things around...

over 2 years ago

Jonathan Bass

Jonathan Bass, Managing Director at Incentivated Ltd

Sounds like we're all in agreement. Of course one never knows - that's why you test different journeys on different platforms. I'm going to the pub where the staff are lovely and responsive.

over 2 years ago

James Gurd

James Gurd, Owner at Digital JugglerSmall Business Multi-user

Amen to @Chris F approach and especially the view that "Our job should be to make it easy for them to get where they want to go".

You can never exactly know a visitor's intentions, I don't always know my own intentions when i pick up my phone, but through data modelling over time you can better estimate this and predict likely next actions and serve content/features/functionality to suit.

@Chris L - it would be brilliant to get something organised and involve people from this thread. It's an area of hot debate and adding a balanced voice to the industry with a clear explanation of pros & cons would I believe help most ecommerce teams. I'd be happy to get involved and help make it happen (though i'd never position myself as a tech expert, more someone with a keen view on the commercial implications).

Sounds like we need to get @Chris F, @Stuart and @Jonathan involved....

cheers
james

over 2 years ago

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Chris Ferdinandi

Sounds splendid! I actually just discovered eConsultancy today when someone tweeted out a link to this post, so I'm actually still trying to make sense of what "this" all is. =)

over 2 years ago

Stuart McMillan

Stuart McMillan, Deputy Head of Ecommerce at Schuh

Chris, Never underestimate the power of a few committed people to change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.

Welcome! :)

over 2 years ago

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Chris Ferdinandi

If anyone wants to chat more or explore some of this in more detail, feel free to reach out — http://gomakethings.com

over 2 years ago

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Simon Roberts

We are in the process of rebuilding (currently in test) our Discovery experience in a responsive framework, and its a challenge, but combining this work with the creation of a responsive pattern library has really helped what we are doing, and enabled us to start to do the rest of the experience in a much faster way. We will have had it all done in 3 months.

The debate we always have had is whether to wait until its all done and then roll it out, or drop it progressively to the user, which we are going to do, focusing first on the more used paths that our data tells us.

We are contextualising the content that is in the users screen based on viewport, and data that backs up the use cases around what people are using their devices for.

@Stuart - the work you guys are doing is great, and I think you are very much ahead of the curve for eCommerce sites.

I read another one of these examples earlier this week, and the examples shown for responsive eCommerce sites were shockingly bad. Big brand names and identity don't enable user experience!

Browsing a website, that is purely content driven is no where near as much of a challenge as a commercial site, and it would be great to get eCommerce guys around a table to discuss the best practices. :) I'm for that!

Great thread, very topical! Let's be honest as well, despite ALL the talk about adaptive, responsive, contextual blah - not many companies are actually doing this STILL, so however your making progress to try and serve your users better - your still doing more than most!

Thanks

over 2 years ago

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Designer

Nice, really like the current trends - simplicity!

over 2 years ago

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lolita bunk, employe at employe

you make $27h...good for you! I make up to $85h working from home. My story is that I quit working at shoprite to work online and with a little effort I easily bring in around $45h to $85h…heres a good example of what I'm doing,.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.. .W­W­W.wo­rk­3­5.ℂ­O­ℳ

over 2 years ago

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Photoshop to HTML

If your resources are stretched or you are short of time, we can help. We offer W3C compliant HTML conversion services at minimal cost.
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over 2 years ago

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SEO Agency Glasgow

Really inspiring designs.

it's really interesting how responsive websites have come to life in the last couple of years.

I remember when I had my first iPhone, all I was doing on safari was zoom in and out.

Thanks

over 2 years ago

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Entreb

Mobile apps and responsive designs are the future. I love to see them in simple, elegant, and minimalist look.

over 2 years ago

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Don Rodgers

I'm glad to see that mobile is getting more colorful.

over 2 years ago

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Central Heating Glasgow

We just started using a mobile website too and it has really been a real success for our business.

Really recommended.

over 2 years ago

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Wedding Favours

Amazing designs,
I would love to get one of these for my site :))

over 2 years ago

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Kevin Lycett

These are mostly apps, that's a different ball game. The real challenge is websites, especially when a client has got a heavily invested site that they expect to see substantially reflected in their mobile site. I'd love to see your list of mobile sites alongside their 'desktop' sites so we can see how well they've addressed this very difficult challenge.

over 2 years ago

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Robson Grant

Thanks for the great post! They say a picture is worth a 1000's words and I enjoyed the fact that you took the time to showcase the different mobile designs with screenshots.

over 2 years ago

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Suparna Rao, Business Solution Analyst at Boston Technology Corporation

Wow, some great inspiration right there!

A sound mobile strategy and user-centric app design is key to app adoption and success . Here is an article we wrote on what not to do while designing mobile apps http://mlabs.boston-technology.com/blog/the-7-cardinal-sins-in-app-design

over 2 years ago

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victoria brown, Software Development Company at Shivam Technology

Wow. This is an outstanding post. According to the recent statistics published by Juniper Research, it has been estimated that there would be an exponential growth in the number of mobile web users by 2014. The number of mobile web users will climb up to 2.4 billion from 1.2 billion.http://www.shivam.com.au/website-development/mobile-website-design.html

over 2 years ago

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Ezgi Gunyel, Web Designer & SEO Expert at InfinPixels

Talk looks really nice. VSCcam App would also be a great addition to this list.

over 2 years ago

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jaysen b, web designer at www.designersforever.com

Amazing designs,
The Kipcall collection of gorgeous screenshots and desktop icons for this mobile chat app is my favourite from the list!

over 1 year ago

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