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Our Internet Statistics Compendium has seen another bumper update this month, collecting the best freely available data from across the digital spectrum across our easy-to-explore ISC documents.

Perhaps the biggest news on the digital media front in August was the release of the hugely comprehensive Communications Market Report 2013 from Ofcom. 

We look at a good proportion of the report in our latest update, but I wanted to collect several of the findings here – some of which may be surprising, even to those with the keenest eyes on the UK’s digital scene.

1. Facebook is the second most popular ‘news’ site

Despite the Daily Mail’s visibility in search engines and success with shareable news content, it is currently the eighth most popular website and app partnership for news content in the UK.

The number one spot falls to The BBC, with 52% of adults using the internet for news choosing the website or app.

The second most popular site among these consumers isn’t even a news site, 19% choose Facebook – more than those heading to Google News, the Sky News site/app and any local news sites/apps.

2. ITV1 receives most tweets per programme

While the BBC is winning the online news war, ITV is winning the Twitter battle. The success of X Factor means that, on average, almost 4,000 tweets are tweeted per programme shown on ITV1.

BBC1 is some way behind in second place with around 2,500 show-related tweets on average. However, this data is excluding news and sports.

3. Tablets are multipurpose childcare ‘tools’

We know that kids are quick to understand the ways of our tablets, but the proportion of adults who are using their devices specifically to keep them occupied is noteworthy. 

59% of tablet-owning adults with children under 18 agree that the ‘tablet computer is a useful tool to keep the children amused while I do other things,’ 66% agree that their ‘tablet computer is a useful tool to keep the children amused while travelling,’ and 60% agree that their ‘tablet computer is a useful tool to help educate the children and help with homework.’

4. Not all screens are getting smaller

Much is written about the shift to content consumption across smaller screens such as mobile and tablets, but it’s interesting to note that TV sizes are not getting smaller nor staying around the same size. 

Nearly 70% of TVs sold are bigger than 26”, a 30% increase since 2004. This is important in terms of online content too, with 28% of sets sold in Q1 2013 having Smart TV capabilities.

5. Bangor: The most wi-fi ready city

Although London undoubtedly boasts the most wi-fi spots (provided by The Cloud and BT) with 3,220, its size and population means there are only around four for every 10,000 people.

However, Bangor in north west Wales – with 21 hotspots across a smaller population – boasts more than 14 wi-fi locations per 10,000 people in the city.

That’s 129% higher than the average across the 11 cities studied, compared to London’s, which are 33% below average.

Luke Richards

Published 20 September, 2013 by Luke Richards

Luke Richards is a freelance writer and a guest blogger on Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or check out his blog

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