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UK based publisher DK has seen huge growth across all of its social channels thanks to its partnership with LEGO.

LEGO is of course one of the most beloved brands on the planet. This month has seen it completely dominate the marketing world with The LEGO Movie, a triumph of content marketing, and its current success is certainly due to its many licences and partnerships.

What success can your brand or company expect to achieve by aligning with the Danish toy company responsible for producing the largest population (albeit plastic) on Earth?

DK has revealed its before & after social media numbers from its campaign with LEGO from September 2013.


Working with creative agency Albion London, DK launched its LEGO Minifigure Year by Year book to celebrate 35 years of the tiny human replica. The challenge from DK's point of view was to make DK and the book the 'heroes' of the campaign, not LEGO itself.

DK created a minifigure sized replica of the book, making this the focus of the marketing push.

The publisher then sent various celebrities and journalists minifigure versions of themselves along with the tiny book.

DK then held a mini book launch and invited the celebrities along with their minifigure selves to attend. This is where DK's social media campaign began.


Before the campaign, DK had 100 followers. 

Here are a few examples of Instagram videos that DK published during the campaign, perfectly capturing the humour and spirit of the occasion with Instagram's 15 second video format.

DK's Instagram account tripled its followers to 300 during October. It has since doubled this figure to 600.

These may not sound like massive figures, but it more than exceeded DK's goal for this nascent social channel and most engagement came from sharing it Instagrams via Twitter.


Before the campaign, DK's Twitter account had 13,000 followers.  

Here are a few examples of DK's tweets during the campaign.

These specially created twitpics containing an interesting fact about LEGO provided an engaging and highly shareable method of publicity.

Engaging with the celebrities who DK created minifigures for certainly paid off too.

In just a couple of weeks, DK added 1,000 followers to its following to make 14,000.   

DK has stated that the normal rate of acquiring followers is 300 per month so this was a big jump. Mainly thanks to DK’s great content produced for a focused campaign, and retweets from celebrity followers and The LEGO Group itself. 


Before the campaign, DK had 12,000 Facebook fans.

On Facebook, DK created various photo albums to support the book launch. 

These are comprehensive collections of images and makes the Facebook page the one channel that you have to become a fan of in order to see all the picture.

It’s worth doing too, as the photos are certainly worth seeing. This is taken from the DK LEGO book Out and About album.

During the campaign DK increased its Facebook fans by 819.

DK’s monthly average for acquiring new Facebook followers is normally around 300. DK currently has 14,223 fans, so this particular channel is seeing the biggest subsequent growth. 

The improvements to each of DK’s social channels are perhaps not the most dizzyingly impressive figures, but its worth highlighting the visible effect of a campaign like this and noting how many more followers are acquired beyond the normal monthly acquisition.

LEGO has built its supportive customer community brick by brick and partnering with LEGO means partnering with a brand which has a particularly passionate and loyal fanbase. Acquiring these fans means acquiring an incredibly valuable fan and it will only reflect positively on your brand.

Christopher Ratcliff

Published 17 February, 2014 by Christopher Ratcliff

Christopher Ratcliff is the editor of Methods Unsound. He was the Deputy Editor of Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or connect via Google+ and LinkedIn

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