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A few years ago businesses could be forgiven for their failure to react quickly enough to the massive shift to mobile technologies, as it was difficult to predict just how big an impact smartphones would have on the customer journey.

However new research from Econsultancy and Adobe shows that even now many companies still haven’t implemented an effective mobile strategy.

In fact only a third of respondents (36%) agree that they have a mobile strategy compared to 45% who disagree.

The Finding the Path to Mobile Maturity Briefing provides data and insights for those wishing to benchmark their own activities around mobile, and to elevate the importance of related business initiatives within their organisations.

The report is based on a global survey of 600 client-side and agency marketers carried out in March and April 2014.

Here are three key findings: 

Traffic doesn’t equal conversions

Despite the huge increase in mobile traffic in recent years, consumers are still unlikely to make a purchase using their smartphone.

On average, businesses surveyed for this study reported that 31% of their web traffic comes via mobile. This is backed up by the data that Adobe collects on behalf of customers, with 31% of the data processed by Adobe Analytics in Q1 2014 originating from a mobile device. 

How much of your / your clients’ total website traffic is via mobile devices? (including tablets and smartphones) 

However 71% of company respondents achieve less than 20% of overall ecommerce revenue through mobile devices.

Obviously this equation fails to take into account the impact of mobile research and price checking on the overall purchase journey, but it does show that conversion rates on mobile are still low for most businesses.

Marketers are responsible for mobile optimisation

In the section investigating how businesses approach their mobile strategy, one of the questions asks which department is directly responsible for mobile optimisation.

Both company and agency respondents indicated that marketing departments are most likely to be in charge of mobile (58% & 60%), followed by development/IT (39% & 40%) and ecommerce teams (29% & 28%).

Who is directly responsible for mobile optimisation within your / your clients’ organisation(s)?

The research also shows that businesses that use input from multiple departments/teams to develop their mobile strategy are more likely to achieved their KPIs and feel more positive about their mobile UX on average.

Responsive isn’t the only way

Responsive design is often touted as the most effective way of optimising websites for mobile, but in reality there is no one-size-fits-all approach.

Almost half (46%) of companies surveyed for this research now use responsive design as part of their attempts to optimise for mobile, with a similar proportion (43%) using a mobile optimized site.

Only 12% of companies currently use adaptive design.

Which of the following have you / your clients employed as part of your/their attempts to optimise for mobile?

David Moth

Published 20 May, 2014 by David Moth @ Econsultancy

David Moth is Editor and Head of Social at Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or connect via Google+ and LinkedIn

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