I've been trawling through some mobile sites to find features I like.

Previously I published probably my favourite 15 mobile features but here's 30 more I like to see on the smaller screen.

As ever, check out the Econsultancy Mobile Web Design and Development Best Practice Guide for more guidance and come to the Festival of Marketing in London, November 12-13th, to learn more.

Right, let's get stuck in with the screenshots!

Lowes

Big bold copy...

copy on lowes mobile site

Different coloured text for ease of reading and comparison.

fonts on lowes mobile site

Lightbox confirmation of add to cart.

added to cart - lowes

Cleartrip

Easy sorts and granular filters make mobile browsing easier. 

filters and sorts - cleartrip  filters and sorts on cleartrip mobile site

Colours used smartly to highlight trip summary (the most important part to check is in the brightest colour), booking call to action (a warning red) and selected departure and return flights (blue to highlight selection).

clear trip cta and colours  cleartrip out and return flights

Argos

Category select with chunky illustrated buttons.

argos boxy web design

Compelling, crisp product-photo slideshows (x6 photos here).

argos mobile product slideshow  argos product slideshow mobile

argos product slideshow

Warby Parker

Menu icons (even tailored for sex in the product categories).

warby parker mobile menu

Beautifully displayed 'you might like these too' suggestions on product page.

you might like

Gif! (take my word for it with these screenshots).

warby parker mobile  warby parker mobile

Beautiful palette, beautiful type.

warby parker mobile  warby parker mobile

BuzzFeed

Bold headlines stand out.

buzzfeed mobile

More neat and simple app download messaging (no App Store screenshots here).

buzzfeed mobile

Share buttons pinned to the bottom of page, for when you've finished reading the article. 

mobile buzzfeed

No dead ends at the end of articles, lots more articles to scroll through (More Buzz).

buzzfeed mobile

TED

OS field input.

ted mobile

Large text ‘About’ section at bottom of homepage.

TED mobile

Kayak

Simple homepage design. Not too many options. 

kayak mobile

Auto-fill fields (today's date, one night stay, one person, one room) and helpful logos.

kayak mobile site

GPS for current location.

gps enabled kayak mobile

HuffPo

Simplicity of page design - nice big text, no annoying native format ads.

huffpo mobile

John Lewis

Chunky fields for fat fingers. 

john lewis mobile

Specsavers

Simplicity of homepage.

specsavers mobile

Chunky product select, this from the Men's category. This saves mistaken clicks. 

specsavers mobile

Top line, easy to read product features.

specsavers mobile

Chefs Feed

Value proposition on homepage.

chefs feed mobile

Header pinned to top of page.

chefs feed sticky menu

Filter menu to allow users to narrow their searches. 

chefs feed mobile

Click to call. Saves time for users. 

click to call

Ben Davis

Published 9 September, 2014 by Ben Davis @ Econsultancy

Ben Davis is Editor at Econsultancy. He lives in Manchester, England. You can contact him at ben.davis@econsultancy.com, follow at @herrhuld or connect via LinkedIn.

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Comments (8)

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Mark Gavagan

Yes, Kayak has really done some nice things on their app.

over 3 years ago

Mark Selwyn

Mark Selwyn, eCommerce and Multi-Channel Retail Consultant

I got bored about halfway down this article (sorry Ben) when I realised that pretty much everything you mention is available/used on desktop sites.....probably even the desktop versions of the sites listed above.

Maybe you should have called the article "30 things I love on websites" and I could have skipped the article, rather than arriving here hoping to find some new insight into mobile design.

over 3 years ago

Ben Davis

Ben Davis, Editor at EconsultancyStaff

@Mark

Let's say I particularly enjoy these features on my mobile. Some of these mobile sites are significantly different to their desktop counterparts.

I'll heed your advice next time and remove any ambiguity from the headline. Thanks as ever for stopping by Mark - always appreciated, however I lure you in. :)

over 3 years ago

Mark Selwyn

Mark Selwyn, eCommerce and Multi-Channel Retail Consultant

:D

And there's nothing wrong with any of these features on a desktop either. Maybe when the human race has evolved to have an index finger shaped like a stylus pen, these mobile sites will be so much more useable.

over 3 years ago

Ben Davis

Ben Davis, Editor at EconsultancyStaff

@Mark

I do a mean impression of this guy > http://goo.gl/fm3izM

over 3 years ago

Mark Selwyn

Mark Selwyn, eCommerce and Multi-Channel Retail Consultant

And this is me http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f5/jaschomb/sausage_fingers-1.jpg Pass the ketchup please.

Back on a slightly more serious note..
a) mobile UX must cater for the less manually dextrous, not just those with lovely slender fingers (I wouldn't even attempt to write this post on my phone) and
b) with the launch of iPhone Plus, very soon we will all be carrying round a laptop pressed to our ears, and wondering what all the fuss about mobiles was.

over 3 years ago

Ben Davis

Ben Davis, Editor at EconsultancyStaff

@Mark

Those sausage fingers are a sight.

over 3 years ago

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Lauren Barham

Hi Ben, thanks for the post! I can completely relate to many of these points that you have mentioned as there is nothing worse than visiting a company's mobile site, particularly when you are looking to purchase something and it being very difficult to do so! Clear, bold titles in my opinion are a must and of course you want to see clearly what you are potentially buying, and high quality images are the way to do this. I also feel that being able to filter a search to avoid a time consuming experience is essential. Also, giving the option to download an app, as BuzzFeed have done, is ideal and of course prompts customers to do so. I work for a marketing recruitment agency and we have recently launched our app, which we feel is a helpful way for people to apply for jobs quickly and easily, similarly to retail apps allowing customers to buy items quickly and easily too! Kind regards, Lauren

over 3 years ago

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