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As ecommerce sites become richer experiences designed to showcase products to their fullest, imagery is getting bigger and crisper.

A small product shot was once par for the course and is now underwhelming compared to those retailers at the forefront of ecommerce.

In our continuing look at web design trends for 2016 and beyond, I thought I'd showcase 10 ecommerce websites that use big and beautiful photography.

And for more on this topic, read:

Now, here we go...

Bang & Olufsen

B&O has some of the slickest scrolling product pages, including a variety of full-screen imagery that reflects the products' design, lifestyle and technology credentials.

The main product image also allows the user to switch quickly between colours, for that added interior design itch.

b&o speaker

b&o speaker

b&o speaker

New Balance

Before you see any detail, in fact any words at all, on the New Balance product page, you are confronted with a full-screen photo of the product.

It's a compelling way of ratcheting up the desirability of each pair of shoes before the customer takes another look at price or specification. 

new balance 

Leica

Leica cameras is duty bound to present great photography on its website, which doesn't have ecommerce functionality but links to resellers and retailers.

What's great is that not only do product pages include illustrated 'overview' and 'details' sections, but also include a large showcase of photographs taken with each model.

leica

leica

leica 

Mulberry

I like the way Mulberry's pop-out zoomable photo gallery is full screen, not simply within a zoom window.

The zoom allows for fine detail to be exposed in a variety of views, including oft-missed perspectives such as the insides of the product.

Kind of what you want to see, before you shell out this much on a handbag.

mulberry

mulberry

mulberry

Land Rover

Wherever Land Rover represents its vehicles online, whether product pages (multi-tabbed, scrolling experiences) or content marketing (heritage and design features) or social media, the imagery is stunning.

Not just the vehicles, but the settings, too. The website uses video on its homepage and many of the product pages, producing sweeping, compelling theatre.

Read our Land Rover website review.

land rover 

land rover

Burberry

It would be silly to expect anything different from Burberry, for whom technology is an integral part of the brand image and a way of relating with new audiences.

There's also no point in selling exclusive, designer clothing online if the detail can't be shown off. 

The studio photographs are classy and in high resolution, complemented by catwalk shots and video.

burberry

burberry

burberry

ETQ.

Beautifully sparse category pages. product pages with scrolling product images, and full-screen model shots.

All this adds up to a site that may not put the emphasis on conversion (in fact, I nearly missed the 'add to basket' button at the bottom right of the product page), but certainly sells the product with exquisite photography.

etq

etq

etq

Hard Graft

A more charming (hipster?) collection of product images, you will not find.

Spot the tiny Snowy the dog that helps to lend some grand scale to what is actually a fairly petite product.

hard graft

hard graft

hard graft

Bjorn Borg

Bjorn Borg presents products in confident and clear style.

Breadcrumb, description, price, colour, size and call to action, alongside a beefy product photo.

bjorn borg

Made.com

A common inclusion in roundups of luscious ecommerce sites that encourage the user to drool.

Made.com is another paean to white space, letting the products take centre stage.

Read our review of Made.com.

made.com

made.com

made.com

Ben Davis

Published 12 January, 2016 by Ben Davis @ Econsultancy

Ben Davis is a senior writer at Econsultancy. He lives in Manchester. You can contact him at ben.davis@econsultancy.com, follow at @herrhuld or connect via LinkedIn.

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