Lush is a company that’s known for its friendly and interactive in-store experience.

From its paper bags to its chatty staff, there are many reasons it has created a fanatical following.

Hoping to bridge the gap between physical and digital, its new app promises “a fresh, fun, and interactive experience” – coupled with the convenience of shopping online.

I decided to give it a whirl, and while it's certainly not perfect, here are four things I think it does particularly well.

And for more on the brand, read our post on why Lush is the undisputed master of 'B-commerce'.

Categorisation

I really like Lush's clear and creative category options.

While it includes standard groups like 'Body' and 'Make-up', it also gives the user the option to browse by emotions and specific scents.

  

As well as making the app easy to navigate, this also aids discovery.

Instead of sticking to certain categories, it encourages users to search around.

 

Location-based features

Location-based marketing is a great way for brands to entice users in-store.

With comprehensive store information and the ability to detect location, Lush does it well.

Providing detail on opening times, contact numbers and directions in an integrated map - it's a great example of how to fuse the physical and mobile experience.

   

Informative product copy

Lush employees are known for being incredibly well-informed about the products they sell.

In the absence of this one-to-one interaction, an extensive amount of information is included in its place.

While the amount of copy looks cluttered on a small screen, I particularly like the attention to detail.

From the benefits of specific ingredients to further products that contain them, it is a nice way to pique interest and extend the user journey.

  

Editorial (and focus on ethics)

Well-known for its dedication to social good, Lush's brand values are also reflected in the editorial sections of its app.

Through the 'discovery' tab, users can read long-form articles about the company's values as well as lighter articles related to the Lush lifestyle.

  

I also appreciate the fact that these articles pop up in the search results. 

When I searched for the term 'bubbles', I was presented with an article on 'how to use bubble bars' as well as the products themselves.

This type of additional content provides extra value and entices users to return.

In conclusion...

While there are many parts of the app that could be improved (the load-times can be slow and the checkout process slightly laboured), there's still a lot to enjoy.

With its creative copywriting, attention-to-detail and location-based technology, it's a decent effort from the cosmetics brand.

To learn more about this topic, book yourself onto Econsultancy’s Mobile Usability and UX Training Course.

Nikki Gilliland

Published 22 September, 2016 by Nikki Gilliland @ Econsultancy

Nikki is a Writer at Econsultancy. You can follow her on Twitter or connect via LinkedIn.

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Deri Jones, CEO at SciVisum Ltd

It's a nice App: but as always with apps: he first question is always whether it is enticing enough to have users add it: our phone screens are already cluttered!

I didn't see a lot there, that the webpage does not already offer

You mentioned the ethics angle - BodyShop pioneered that route, and Lush have done well with it.

Ethics often has a political angle - it is striking that the brand seems to be nailing it's political colours to the mast by promoting John McDonnell (for non-UK readers - he's Labour Shadow chancellor, and central in the current in-fighting with the party right now) : see: "Get stuck in John":
- https://uk.lush.com/article/get-stuck-john-mcdonnell-post-brexit-politics.

Strong political alignments are a risk strategy: remember the backlash to Tony Blair's 'cool Britannia'?

I wonder how this rather polarised statement is received by Lush's brand followers:
> Ethics Director, and self confessed non-voter, Hilary Jones asked: “The conversation in the media is very narrow and right wing. When are you going to sort out the media?”

almost 2 years ago

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