We’ve got more stats than you can shake a stick at this week, including news about influencer marketing, online search, and ad viewability. As always, the Internet Statistics Compendium includes lots more to boot.

Now, let’s get stuck in.

Users spend nearly 30 minutes on Instagram every day

Thanks to the popularity of Instagram Stories, which is now a year old, Instagram has revealed that people are spending more time on the platform overall.

Users under the age of 25 are said to spend more than 32mins a day on Instagram. Similarly, users aged 25 and older use the app for more than 24mins a day.

Stories has 250m daily users, with teenagers consuming four times more stories and producing six times more stories than non-teens.

Brands have also been quick to see the value of Instagram Stories – 51% of monthly active businesses have posted a story in the last 28 days.

Marketers willing to pay Facebook influencers £75k per post

Research by Rakuten Marketing has revealed that UK marketers are willing to pay influencers more than £75,000 for a single Facebook post mentioning their brand. This figure rises depending on the industry, with premium fashion marketers saying they’d be willing to pay up to £160,000 per post. 

Earnings also differ by platform, as celebrity influencers on Facebook are said to earn an average of 12% more than their YouTube peers. And while Snapchat is ranked fifth in terms of earnings, marketers still say they are willing to pay stars as much as £53,000 per Snap.

This news comes despite the fact that 86% of marketers admit they aren’t entirely sure how influencer fees are calculated, and 38% cannot tell whether a campaign drives sales.

Brands must offer more to build loyalty with younger customers

A new study by Ricoh UK has highlighted the generational differences when it comes to attitudes about customer service.

Research found that older age groups are less forgiving to brands, with 62% of those aged over 55 saying they would be prepared to walk away from a brand with a laborious sales process compared to 43% of those aged 16-24.

Meanwhile, younger customers expect far more information at the consideration stage and post-sales interaction – 43% of those aged 16-24 rated third party reviews and recommendations as the factor that impresses them most, compared to only 20% of people aged 55+.

Out of all age groups, 55% of customers say they would abandon a purchase if they found the process difficult.

Brands send more holiday-themed emails despite lower open rates 

A new study by Yes Lifecycle Marketing, which involved the analysis of almost 8bn emails sent in Q4 2016, found that holiday-themed emails generated a 14.6% lower open rate than standard emails.

Despite this, brands sent 14.5% more emails to subscribers during the period, with 55% of all brands partaking in holiday-themed campaigns. 

The research also suggests that customers do not particularly value discounts in holiday-themed emails. Emails that didn't include an offer achieved higher open rates than those that promised money off.

UK’s June heatwave sparked a 200% increase in Fitbit searches

It might feel like a distant memory now, but analysis by Summit has revealed how retailers benefited from the recent spell of hot weather in the UK.

As temperatures reached 34.5 degrees this June, consumers purchased more goods relating to fitness and the great outdoors. Argos sold enough paddling pools to hold over 70m litres of water during the heatwave.

Meanwhile, Fitbit searches saw a 200% increase in demand, and camping-related search terms increased by 86%, driving the biggest increase in demand in nine years. Lastly, searches for fishing equipment more than doubled, seeing a 193% increase, and demonstrating how changes in temperature can influence purchasing decisions.

Discounts on direct hotel bookings increase average order value

Research conducted by Hotelchamp has shown that discounts can result in higher conversion rate and average order value for direct hotel bookings.

It found that hotels offering a 5% discount (rather than no discount) resulted in an 11% increase in conversion rate and a 12% increase in average booking value. When this was increased to a 10% discount, it found a 50% increase in conversion rate and an 11% increase in average booking value. 

So, despite offering a discount to guests in both instances, the average booking value always increased by over 10%, meaning that customers were naturally more inclined to purchase upsell features such as breakfast or a room upgrade.

A quarter of US consumers stop buying from brands due to political beliefs

Ipsos has found that the political preferences of consumers have an increasing impact on their buying behaviour. 

In a survey of 2,016 US adults, it found that a quarter of American consumers have stopped using products and services due to boycotts or a company’s political leanings.

The study also revealed that there has been an uptick in online search traffic for the term ‘boycott’ since Trump was officially elected in November 2016. Meanwhile, it found that the firms with the highest rate of consumer boycotts also registered the worst stock market performance between November 2016 and February 2017.

UK ad viewability reaches highest level in over a year

According to analysis by Meetrics, UK ad viewability has risen for the first time in nine months.

This appears to be due to a significant increase in the amount of banner ads that meet minimum requirements – rising from 47% to 51% of ads in the second quarter of 2017. This is the highest level since Q3 2016, when 54% of ads met the minimum standard. 

Despite this news, the UK is still lagging behind in viewability levels compared to elsewhere in Europe, where countries like Austria and France have an average of 69% and 58% respectively. 

UK consumers positive about personal job security

In a survey of 2,000 UK consumers, Lloyds found that 64% of people were feeling positive about their personal financial situation in June – up from 63% in May and just two percentage points lower than in June of last year.

Despite the value of the pound falling since then, UK consumers appear relatively unfazed when it comes to their own personal prospects, with 80% saying they feel optimistic about their own job security, and 53% saying they are positive about employment prospects nationally.

Howoever, the survey did highlight some disparity between attitudes about personal finances and the national economy as a whole, with just 33% saying they feel good about the UK’s financial situation compared to 45% in June 2016.

Nikki Gilliland

Published 4 August, 2017 by Nikki Gilliland @ Econsultancy

Nikki is a Writer at Econsultancy. You can follow her on Twitter or connect via LinkedIn.

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Comments (2)

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grawhill jessica, BDE at FuGenX Technologies

Your post is good, thank you for sharing, trilling digital marketing.You have properly and details explained

2 months ago

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Thomas Juul, Data manager at Kostumepusheren

Great post with interesting points. I like the graphic illustrations. They make the post clear and easy to understand.

2 months ago

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