We’ve got a blockbuster round-up of stats to kick off September.

The round-up includes news about social ads, personalisation and lots more to boot. You can also download the Internet Statistics Compendium for further facts and figures.

Please enjoy.

McGregor generates the most social media engagements

He might have lost in the ring, but data from 4C Insights has revealed that Conor McGregor was victorious in generating online media conversation.

McGregor saw more than 3,294,078 Facebook and Twitter engagements on fight night, which includes tweets, retweets, replies and likes. In comparison, Mayweather generated 2,986,484 engagements, highlighting McGregor’s ability to generate mass hype and media discussion.

The fight amassed 889,705 engagements on Facebook and Twitter in the week leading up to it, before a massive surge on the night itself saw engagements rise 605% to 6,280,562.

Small businesses falling behind on digital transformation

G2 Crowd’s third quarterly report has revealed that small business owners are failing to effectively market their businesses in a digital world. Research found that 24% of businesses are still largely investing in either newspaper ads and/or billboards, while only 19% of respondents are spending money on Google AdWords. 

That being said, the report suggests that technology is an area of focus for small businesses interested in scaling growth, with 47% planning to increase IT spending this year.

Number of hours spent checking email decreases 27%

According to Adobe’s third annual email survey, people are checking their work and personal email less frequently than they were in 2016.

The overall number of hours spent on email per day decreased 27% from last year. Specifically, there was a 28% decrease in consumers checking email messages from bed in the morning, with more than a quarter of consumers now waiting until they get to the office to check their inboxes. 

The report also suggests one in five consumers never check email outside of normal work hours, and nearly half don’t or rarely check while they’re on holiday. 

However, this is not the case for millennials. More than half of 18-24 year olds still check their email while in bed in the morning, and 43% of millennials aged 25-34 admit to doing the same.

Google and Alexa make up 90% of voice commerce market share

The news that Amazon and Google are joining forces could mean big things for voice commerce, according to insight from Walker Sands.

Currently, 24% of consumers own a voice controlled device, while 20% plan to purchase within the next year. Together Google and Alexa make up approximately 90% of the market share. 

US social ads failing to drive conversions

Research by CivicScience has found that ads on social platforms like Facebook and Instagram are failing to convert users. 

In a survey of over 1,900 US consumers, just 1% of respondents aged 13 and older said they have previously made a purchase based on a Snapchat ad, and only 4% said they have bought anything after seeing an Instagram ad. Overall, 45% said that they have never purchased anything based on ads they saw from social media sites, and over a third said they don’t use social media.

Facebook was found to be the most influential channel for purchasing behaviour, with 16% of consumers buying a product based on a Facebook ad.

Personalisation brings footwear brand 64% increase in ROI 

Dune London has revealed that it’s seen a 64% increase in return on investment per customer after personalising its media to real people, in partnership with Conversant.

Instead of targeting segments or cookies, Dune tailored messages to individual customer’s specific needs and interests. This involves showing complementary products post-purchase, and tailoring ads according to what kinds of products a customer tends to browse and buy the most.

As well as a 64% increase in ROI per customer, personalisation also led to a 33% increase in messaged conversion rate.

Push notifications boost in-app spending by 16%

According to Leanplum, push notifications can lead to a significant increase in mobile conversions.

The Insights to Mobile Revenue report states that push notifications can boost in-app spending by 16% – driving nearly 10 times more users to make a purchase compared to those who did not receive one.

Research also found that promotional push notifications sent on a Saturday resulted in over twice as many purchases than notifications sent on Thursday. Meanwhile, push notifications sent during the late afternoon lead to 2.7 times more purchases than any other time of day.

One in nine marketers will spend more than £100,000 on influencers in the next year

New research from Takumi has revealed that one in nine marketers plan to spend in excess of £100,000 on influencer marketing in the next 12 months.

39% of professionals say they will spend up to £10,000, while a further fifth predict their budget to fall somewhere between £10,000 and £100,000. In contrast, just 4% say they plan to forgo influencer campaigns entirely. 

This shows the extent to which influencer marketing has grown in popularity, with 26% of marketers now believing it is a more effective way to target consumers than traditional advertising. 43% agree that it is more effective, but only for millennial audiences.

‘In the moment’ searches are on the rise

Google research has found that consumers are more impatient than ever before, with increasing expectations for brands to immediately meet their needs. 

Searches related to ‘same-day shipping’ have grown more than 120% since 2015. Similarly, searches for ‘open now’ have tripled over the past two years, while searches for ‘store hours’ have dropped.

Lastly, Google found that travel-related searches for ‘tonight’ and ‘today’ have grown more than 150% on mobile, reflecting consumer demand for spontaneous and in-the-moment bookings.

Consumers more likely to make frivolous purchases on touchscreens

A new study has revealed that consumers are more likely to make purchases when browsing on a touchscreen device, especially when it comes to things they don’t necessarily need.

This is because touchscreens create more experiential thinking in users, while desktops evoke rational consideration. 

An experiment found that participants were more inclined to buy a restaurant gift card than a grocery gift card on a touchscreen, while desktop users favoured the opposite. In this sense, desktop elicits a similar response to shopping in-store, where a series of logical steps means we are less likely to be driven by emotions or impulse.

Nikki Gilliland

Published 1 September, 2017 by Nikki Gilliland @ Econsultancy

Nikki is a Writer at Econsultancy. You can follow her on Twitter or connect via LinkedIn.

550 more posts from this author

You might be interested in

Comments (0)

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Daily_pulse_signup_wide

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Digital Pulse newsletter. You will receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.