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Pete Cashmore at Mashable reports that Myspace has blocked its members from another third-party service – this time Trakzor , an application that lets you see who has been visiting your Myspace profile and view them on an interactive map.

Although the reasons aren’t clear, the app is just the latest to be banned by the social networking site - as highlighted by founder Brad Greenspan, who is suing Myspace (again) for what he calls ‘censorship’.

Even widgets from video sharing sites YouTube and Revver have been blocked in the past.

We recently spoke to Snipperoo’s CEO Ivan Pope about what this approach might mean for Myspace et al, if and when these widget-based services become a differentiator between social networking sites.

It will be particularly interesting to see how much pressure is placed on Myspace’s walled garden model when its rivals allow members more control over the ads they receive. Ivan says:

"Although people say Myspace will be very powerful for widgets and some widgets are very successful in Myspace, the problem is Myspace will try and control what users can put on the site. For example, Myspace won’t allow you to put advertising widgets on the site as they want to sell advertising, so there’s conflict there already.

"Myspace – and the dozens of sites that have a similar issue – will either have to let people put whatever they want on the site, or they will start losing traffic to sites that have a different approach. What we will see is smaller sites offering any widget in the world as part of their offering, and seeing if they can compete with the bigger networks."

Whether this happens or not, it would be helpful if Myspace was more transparent about its banning policy, as Cashmore points out:

"MySpace may have very good reasons to block all these sites, but there’s really no policy in place with regard to external widgets, and there doesn’t seem to be much communication from MySpace on the issue.

"As a result, developers are left wondering whether they’re going to be next on the block list."


Watch out for the full interview with Ivan, which we'll be publishing shortly.


Published 10 January, 2007 by Richard Maven

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