Settle down for this week’s round up of stats, which includes news about online ads, mobile commerce, customer service, and more. 

The Internet Statistics Compendium is also worth a look, as it’s full of the very latest news and digital marketing data.

Consumers open to automatic buying via digital assistants

Econsultancy’s Next Revolution of Search report has revealed that consumers are more open and willing to experiment with intelligent digital assistants, making this the next logical extension of search. 

80% of survey respondents said that it would be “incredibly useful” if a personal digital assistant could help find the options right for them. Meanwhile, the report highlights the potential benefits of automatic buying using digital assistants, meaning purchases or transactions that have little or no input from consumers. 

75% said that this kind of service would be useful to them, and 67% said they would be likely to have products delivered automatically if there was no unexpected change or variation in price. Even among those who are sceptical of such a service, 90% admit that it would make their lives better to have products they use regularly delivered automatically.

Subscribers can download the report in full here

Tide sees the most Super Bowl conversation

According to Talkwalker, there were 5.3 million mentions of the Super Bowl across Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram last Sunday. Online conversation peaked at the halftime show, with one million mentions of Justin Timberlake, and 117,200 mentions of his tribute to Minneapolis hero, Prince. Despite not making a surprise appearance, there were still 43,800 mentions of his previous halftime show co-performer, Janet Jackson.

When it comes to brand ads, Tide generated the most conversation with its ad featuring David Harbour from Stranger Things. There were 163,800 mentions of Tide during the event. 

Another advertising highlight was the Mountain Dew and Doritos joint ad featuring a rap battle between Morgan Freeman, Peter Dinklage, and Missy Elliot. The ad was mentioned 115,100 times overall.

Customers fed up within five minutes

It only takes five minutes for US consumers to feel fed up with a customer service experience – that’s according to a new report by Point Source (based on a survey of 1,008 US consumers). It found that 34% of customers on hold with a retail customer service agent want to switch to a chatbot after five minutes. However, 59% of consumers will also grow frustrated if a chatbot doesn’t provide them a resolution within the save time frame.

Data privacy is still pressing issue for people too, with 41% citing this as a cause for concern when using a chatbot. 44% say accuracy of information provided, while frustrations over chatbots not understanding intent or language remains the biggest – 51% cite this concern.

When asked about why customers might want a chatbot’s help, the majority of respondents said they are open to interactions throughout the majority of the customer journey, such as when researching online and tracking and order. However, there still appears to be resistance post-purchase, with 80% of retail customers not being comfortable with chatbot assistance when resolving problems with an order, and 71% saying the same for the in-store experience.

More on chatbots:

Mobile commerce on the rise in Asia

According to a report by Warc, the popularity of shopping on smartphones is also on the rise in Asia. 71% of Asian consumers are said to use their smartphones to help them shop, compared to 59% of all global shoppers.

There are also two markets in particular where smartphone usage is booming. 76% of shoppers in Indonesia are using their smartphones, and 90% of shoppers in China are doing the same. 

While the in-store experience is also a big focus in these markets, mobile commerce is also becoming an increasingly natural and instinctual experience, as shoppers forgo desktop entirely and go straight to smartphones.

Ad engagement 29% higher on premium sites than social

Social media is typically associated with high levels of attention, however, when it comes to ads, studies suggest that it could be failing to properly engage users. This is the basis of recent research  by Newsworks and the Association for Online Publishing (AOP), which aimed to find out why the context of quality editorial generates greater engagement than social. 

The research measured participants’ brain responses to identical ads in different contexts, analysing a number of areas of the brain in order to identify key research metrics. 

It found that ads seen on a premium publisher site are viewed for 17% longer, create 29% higher engagement (due to personal relevance) and generate greater levels of left brain and right brain memory encoding than ads on Facebook and YouTube. Memory encoding is key because it correlates with decision-making and purchase intent. 

Lastly, ads seen within a premium context also provoke stronger, more positive emotional responses.

More on ads:

Generation Z consume 10 hours of digital content a day

Adobe has revealed that Britain is a nation addicted to digital content, as millennials spend 8.5 hours a day consuming digital content, while Generation Z spend a staggering 10.6 hours a day doing the same.

This news comes from a survey of over 1,000 UK consumers on their daily digital habits. The results also show that, despite increased consumption, users are also becoming increasingly sceptical about fake news content. 

77% of those surveyed said that they are more careful about the content they engage with than they were five years ago. As a result, consumers respond strongly to branded content if it provides an authentic, well designed, and relevant experiences. 46% of consumers say that this would inspire them to make a purchase.

UK shoppers turn to smartphones for groceries

Shoppercentric’s Stock Take Index, which comes from a survey of over 1,000 Brits, has found a substantial increase in smartphone usage for grocery shopping. 

While computers and laptops are the most used touchpoint – up 6% on 2017 to 63% of shoppers - smartphones saw a bigger increase of 18% to reach 45%. Tablets secured the third place spot with 29% of shoppers using the device.

Elsewhere, the report also highlights an increased use of discount stores – up 13% on 2017 to 57% of UK shoppers.

Nikki Gilliland

Published 9 February, 2018 by Nikki Gilliland @ Econsultancy

Nikki is a Writer at Econsultancy. You can follow her on Twitter or connect via LinkedIn.

670 more posts from this author

You might be interested in

Comments (1)

Avatar-blank-50x50

Alastair Mack, European Media Manager at Honda Europe

103.4m viewers of the Superbowl and apparently 50% watch the adverts so 51.7m. Although that doesn't count crowds viewing one screen...

On the basis of 51.7m that's a 'mention to viewer rate' (163,800/51,700,000) of 0.3%. Is that any good? A banner ad CTR average is 0.1% for a rather random comparison. It's better than Dorito's/Mountain Dew but then didn't Tide have four spots?

I guess my point is I see a lot of digital stats (UVs, VTR, Comments, Likes, etc etc) with minimal context so I've tried to create some.

PS I thought the Tide ad was great!

4 months ago

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Daily_pulse_signup_wide

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Digital Pulse newsletter. You will receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.