{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

We've been charting the performance of the top 50 brands on social media (and looks at why some brands have done better than others), and there are some interesting results.

So, the votes are in, the results have been verified, and we can now reveal that, according to our Social Media Reputation Indexthe most social brand in the world is.... eBay.

That's right: not Apple, or Google (though they are, predictably perhaps, numbers two and three on the list), but the brand that changed the way we shopped online, and paved the way for all things social. In social media terms, eBay punches above its brand weight (it ranks at 43 on the Interbrand index of top brands).

Blackberry comes in at number four on the list (it's at a relatively low 54 on the Interbrand index), which goes to show how far the brand has moved away from its 'Blackberry Dad' image.

Amazon is at number five, reflecting the value of the way Amazon has built word of mouth and social tools into its core service.

When we put the Index together, we calculated the social media reputation of the top 100 brands in the world by measuring the social media 'noise' (ie how many people are talking about it) with its popularity (whether what those people are saying is positive or negative).

We then added a 'recency' score, which provides a topical adjustment, so a brand that is being talked about now has a higher recency score than one talked about last six months ago.

The most important thing was the human analysis of the brand scores, to make sure we took into account sentiment such as sarcasm or slang, and the relative influence of different channels. We then gave each brand an overall cocial media reputation (SMR) score out of 100.

There were some real surprises. The brands that people are talking about online are not always the top value brands.

Harley-Davidson, for example, has some of the most loyal fans online, ranking it at number 30 in the top 50 social brands. On the other hand, there are some brands that you might expect to be doing better. Smirnoff does some fantastic social media work but it is really inconsistent, which means it ranks lower than it could in the top 50 list.

And then there's Apple. It comes in at number two on the social brand list, does absolutely no official social media work, and yet has the highest satisfaction score of any brand on the top 50 list. Which just goes to show that the first rule of social media is to have a great product.

Social media snakes and ladders small

Steve Richards

Published 17 February, 2011 by Steve Richards

Steve Richards is MD of social media agency Yomego and a contributor to Econsultancy.

31 more posts from this author

Comments (16)

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Andy Harding

Andy Harding, Executive Director, Multi Channel at House of Fraser

Does this tell us that much? Where are the retail brands? Are Visa really more social than Asos?

almost 6 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Andy Hopkinson, Industrial Placement - Marketing Communications at Mercedes-Benz UK

I have to agree with Andy. I can't believe Visa are more social than Asos. Asos have managed to master relating to their audience with relevant information. I have been a customer for a few years now and they have really impressed me with their social work.

almost 6 years ago

Ed Stivala

Ed Stivala, Managing Director at n3w media

I struggle to see what relevant insight this provides? Seems to me that it merely proves so called "success" in social media has no correlation to any meaningful business metric.

Therefore, perhaps what it does achieve is to re-enforce the belief that social media can often be a complete waste of time & resource.

almost 6 years ago

Jan Rezab

Jan Rezab, CEO at Socialbakers

And I completely agree with all 3 people above - Ed, Andrew, and Andy.

almost 6 years ago

Jan Rezab

Jan Rezab, CEO at Socialbakers

Andrew: I believe people might be posting information about a visa (you know, like in their passport), not about "Visa". Thats why their reach is probably high. :-)

almost 6 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Michelle Carvill

Hmmm - what about brands that have been wholly created via social media - eg: #meatwagon? They've been in press every week for the past month!

How are they tracking this data? I monitor the keyword BlackBerry for a telecoms client of ours - and let me tell you - tweets are usually focused around the fact that the BlackBerry has let them down in some way. So this tells us absolutely nothing. Top 50 brands makes it sound positive - and that's highly unlikely...

almost 6 years ago

Ed Stivala

Ed Stivala, Managing Director at n3w media

@Michelle have to be honest I have never even heard of #meatwagon let alone seen it in the press :)

almost 6 years ago

Steve Richards

Steve Richards, MD at Yomego

Firstly, thank you all for your comments. A few notes on the research: it would be impossible for us to score every single brand in social media, so we started with the Interbrand 100 and rescored every brand on the list against our social media reputation scoring criteria (you can find it here http://www.interbrand.com/en/best-global-brands/best-global-brands-2008/best-global-brands-2010.aspx ) This is why you won't find brands like ASOS, or.. meatwagon, in our findings.

The infographic above is simply a visual representation of our topline results, and I agree that on its own, it isn't very meaningful. The full supplement was published yesterday in NMA magazine, and you can read it on the NMA website: http://bit.ly/eIV10m

Michelle & Jan, our methodology is very thorough, and we are careful to use lots of exclusions and qualifiers to ensure that as many ambiguous references and false positives are excluded. This is a time-consuming process, but necessary as no automated analysis can be 100% accurate.

If you would like more information about our methodology or the scores themselves, please get in touch.

Thanks again for your comments.

almost 6 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Christina Ing

I love the Snakes and Ladders infographic!

almost 6 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

JD Lasica

It's certainly ironic that Apple -- notorious as an anti-social media company -- rates the No. 2 spot. But I realize this is ranking brands and not companies' social media efforts.

almost 6 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Courtney Hunt

No measure is perfect, and each must be understood in context. Based on the comments above, it seems that some people are missing the point about what Yomego has measured - and how that measurement can be interpreted. Their misperceptions also seem to reflect a lack of understanding about what a "social media reputation" is. Though it may be an exception, Apple kind of proves the rule - their reputation is based on what others say about them in social spaces, not their own engagement. It'd be interesting to see a comparison of measures of social media engagement and social media reputation, including both their correlation with each other and any correlations with other reliable measures (e.g., market share). Though these comparisons wouldn't indicate causality (at least not without a more complex longitudinal study), they could provoke interesting discussions about what matters most.

I for one applaud Yomego's efforts for helping us move discussions about social media out of conjecture and opinion and into something more empirically-based. Since we are still in the early days of the Digital Era, I have no doubt they will continue to improve their research and help advance the important topic of measurement.

Courtney Hunt
Founder, Social Media in Organizations (SMinOrgs) Community

almost 6 years ago

Jan Rezab

Jan Rezab, CEO at Socialbakers

Steve Richards: I didn`t find the NMA article any more useful than your website. Lets say I am a non-educated marketing director of a brand - what are you telling me? What are you measuring? Are they open opinions? From social media? Which social media? Does it consider engagement? What is the reach factor calculated against? Its category? What are the variables? Those are just the few questions I would start with. Please enlighten us, ideally with a new post to restart this activity.

Don`t get me wrong - I love social media KPI`s, but they have to make sense and be explained. I understand it might be a struggle, we are struggling with it every day on Socialbakers to make them sensible, but to clearly put two undefined indexes together, and only you know how they are calculated, only seems unfair.

I simply have a feeling that these KPIs are based a bit off, or unexplained. I don`t think we should get in touch about it - the point was, I think that if you are publishing a rank of brands - and clearly saying that they are good because xyz - I think you should note why, or don`t publish them in the first place.

Courtney: I would like to get enlightened on how these comparisons were created. Until these so called metrics and measures are clearly published and visible, this won`t be helpful at all.

almost 6 years ago

Steve Richards

Steve Richards, MD at Yomego

Thanks, Christina, JD, Courtney and Jan for your comments.

We will continue to refine the metrics that deliver the SMR scores for brands, and it will be interesting to add more parameters to provide more context. The raw data for our reach and satisfaction ratings is provided by Alterian SM2 - which monitors comment in 29,000 social spaces. Then our human team validates a representative sample of this data to account for sarcasm, slang and other elements which can notoriously distort results, esp if used by a key influencer. Allowances are made for different sectors so we can provide a legitimate ranking.

The key to our SMR service is the analysis and insight we provide to brands. The SMR score is a snapshot; a benchmark as a starting point.

We help clients to analyse the data in tune with their specific objectives and align our recommendations alongside marketing activity in other channels.

almost 6 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Anthony Permal

I agree with JD, this is an indicator of how much people are talking about the brands, not necessarily how well the brands are socialising.

almost 6 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Joe Buhler

The title of this ranking seems to me a misnomer as at least in some cases it doesn't reflect the social media engagement by these brands but - as Anthony stated - the mentions they get by people across the social web. Apple is a case in point. They don't communicate in social media at all it seems.

almost 6 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Patrick

Why not present it as a Giraffe? Wouldn't that make much more sense?

over 5 years ago

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Daily_pulse_signup_wide

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Daily Pulse newsletter. Each weekday, you ll receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.