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In reality there are plenty of critical features about site search from the position of the search box itself to the way you guide the users actions from the search results page itself.

These five critical areas of site search ought to give you food for thought and, if implemented successfully, make a considerable difference to how your site search pages perform.

1. Can it go mobile?

Whether you choose mobile web or smartphone app, search will be one of the key means of interacting with your brand online whilst on the move.

The mobile browser experience is already being enhanced with developments like Google Instant Search which will only serve to increase the level of expectation from mobile savvy users.

This makes the experience you offer within your mobile website extremely important. Understanding which facets to present and how they are shown is a key pruning exercise - less is definitely more.

Consider the inclusion of fundamental facets like brand, category, price and reviews. If there is a time critical or location based element to your service consider including this info on the search results (e.g. select nearest store).
For example here's a couple of mobile web search results pages showing what is possible. Note the simple presentation of refinement options, the use of related searches and sort options (highlighted in red):

Mobile pic 1Mobile pic 2

Mobile pic 3

2. Rich autocomplete  

With many users perceptions being influenced by the functionality of web search engines, using autocomplete within your search box is becoming a standard and expected feature of search input methods these days.

Implementing this within your website aids the user's thought process by prompting them with suggestions. Statistically you should see a reduction in misspellings and to a lesser extent bounce rates (correctly spelt terms will hopefully return relevant product!).

Autocomplete pic1

Autocomplete that includes images extends this feature further and enhances your website. It has been shown to improve several important areas not least conversion rates and average order value as the products shown should match with what is being typed thus taking users straight to the product page.  

Autocomplete pic2

3. Relevance

This is an obvious, easy and very important one to test. Put simply, websites that return irrelevant results against a search term are losing conversion opportunities.

Your first page of results informs the visitor how well you understand their needs. A relevant set of results will make the visitor feel confident about your site and its ability to cater for them.

To some extent brand loyalty will compensate as some users will persist. But building brand loyalty should include a great (buying) experience not forgiving a poor one.

Typically users are making an assessment of your search results within seconds often by taking a quick glance at the first few items in your search results (sometimes not scrolling below the fold!) so relevance is an important area to address if you want to optimise your e-commerce site.

A good site search engine will help with this as well as good product information and categorisation.

4. Additional content

If you are a retailer, search is about more than just finding product. If you are a publishing site, search results are more than just an article.

Providing additional information like video, reviews, blogs, guides, recommendations, twitter updates etc related to the search term will further engage the visitor and help differentiate your business.

For example, if searching for an article about a country on a travel site why not include videos and reviews about the location as well as other information like a list of accommodation and events?

Similarly, if you are retailing health and beauty products include guides pertaining to the application of the product, best practice tips, related products and so on.

Here are some examples to illustrate the point:

 Additional content pic 1

Additional content pic 2 

5. Reports

Often the most neglected but increasingly the most insightful part of a site search solution if you are prepared to invest the time and effort. For example, by analysing what poor searches are being generated you can assess many aspects of the site e.g:  

  • Is it a merchandising problem? You don't stock the item.
  • A data problem. You are returning hundreds or thousands of products for a search term
  • A usability problem.  Lack of synonyms, resulting in irrelevant or fewer products being shown or not making it easy to refine search result.

Equally, your top keywords will give you an indication of what terms are being associated with your site once visitors arrive as well as some insight into what are the most popular products for those keywords.

This is particularly useful for merchandisers who are looking at new and innovative ways to promote products/brands and can serve to stimulate ideas about how to innovate the site beyond just product.

Additionally, these kinds of reports can be used to track long tail search terms used within the site that which potentially you may want to use for SEO and PPC purposes.

By combining your site search analytics with web analytics you can track, measure and report on the monetary value of types of visitor, site search vs non site search, particular keywords and other essential kpi’s.

Typically you will find that site search visitors convert better and generate a higher average order value.

Osric Powell

Published 21 March, 2011 by Osric Powell

Osric Powell is in charge of Business Development at SLI Systems and a contributor to Econsultancy. 

3 more posts from this author

Comments (3)

Andrew Lloyd Gordon

Andrew Lloyd Gordon, Digital Marketing Expert, Speaker and Trainer at New Terrain Limited

This is a really useful piece Osric.

It's shocking how many websites provide a poor internal site search experience. Especially when you think how basic this aspect of a website should be.

On several projects I've worked on, improving site search is often a simple task. For example, enhancing the visual layout of results and listing what search terms the searcher had just used (people forget really quickly) can make a massive difference to Customer Journeys and Website Conversions.

After all, if we don't improve our internal searches, visitors either leave our sites or use Google as an internal search engine?!

over 5 years ago

Osric Powell

Osric Powell, Business Development at Ecommerce Retail Solutions Advocacy

Thanks Andrew. Yep, Site Search is often overlooked or considered 'satisfactory' although in many instances it is performing very badly. Given that SERPS (Search Engine Results Pages) are one of the most frequently visited pages of a website it ought to be given higher priority in my opinion.

Your final point is a good one. It would be interesting to note how many users resort to using Google as an alternative search engine because they are frustrated with the site search results they have been presented with. This is tantamount to ignoring someone in your shop and telling them to go and buy further along the High Road when they ask if you stock what they are looking for!

over 5 years ago



so so

over 5 years ago

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