{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Animation is often overlooked when planning a marketing campaign, meaning that many organisations can miss out on using this powerful tool.

When Google launches a new product or service, it often bases its marketing campaign around a single piece of content, an animation.

For Google, animation allows it to explain a new idea in a succinct and clear way to a wide audience. It’s the best way to communicate their message.

Take a look at the animation for Google Offers...

The reason that animation works so well for Google is that its products are not tangible things. You’re not buying a thing, you’re buying a service… an idea.

But explaining ideas is difficult; have you ever found yourself in a coffee shop scribbling on the back of a napkin as you explain an idea to a friend?

Well, that’s exactly what animation is about - talking and drawing at the same time. 

Imagine having to explain how interest payments work on a bank account or illustrate how a new drug targets cancer cells. These things are difficult to describe but animation can show people, not just tell them.

And it’s not just tech companies that benefit from animation. People are increasingly using it as a powerful tool for marketing... 

Books:

Explaining social problems:

Driving traffic to websites:

As people start to use animation more, we’re seeing some great examples but also pretty terrible ones too. The key to making a successful animation online is knowing what you want to achieve and keeping it short.

Like any good piece of marketing it should act as a conduit. There should be a way into the animation, perhaps a placement on a blog or Facebook, and a way out, this is often just a link at the end or request to pass the animation on to a friend.

The other key to a successful online animation is knowing your audience. Make something they’ll enjoy and learn from. If you can do that, they’ll do all the sharing for you.

For more information about the animation process, take a look at my article Making Animation for the Web.

Wes West

Published 30 June, 2011 by Wes West

Wes West is a Designer at Torchbox and a contributor to Econsultancy. 

1 more post from this author

Comments (7)

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Avatar-blank-50x50

Sheila Averbuch

Hear, hear! I think companies are put off by the production costs; it's difficult to do something worthwhile for less than €10,000, and prices can easily be triple that. But even if it does eat up your conferencing/marketing budget for the next few quarters, what a massive impact you can make with a great animation, especially if, as you say above, it's a concept that lends itself to back-of-the-napkin drawings.

I knew of a software company that was walking out of meetings where they should've been making a sale, but their targets just didn't get it, until they started using animation; I know of other startups (in the US) who are putting all their pennies together and spending basically their whole budget on a "launch"animation that quickly explains their unique offering. The relatively huge amount of dross on YouTube is a great opportunity for companies to do something worthwhile, if they can get over the sticker shock.

If I could give just two pieces of advice for companies considering doing animation, one: start early, the timescales can be a month or two longer than you think. Two: pare your pitch down to the absolute bones, because you won't have time to stuff all those extras into the script that you'll be tempted to include (all the features of your product, your long list of satisfied customers, etc.-- you're only looking at around 100 words for a thirty second animation).

Sheila Averbuch -- ENNclick

over 5 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Jeff Fogliano

Good points all, but I think you might not be taking it quite far enough.

First, why limit speaking to the value of animation in the online space? We've been developing more and more animated broadcast spots for clients - and seen that they can be just as engaging as traditional live-action spots at fractions of the cost.

But in the digital space, passively watching an animation - while more engaging than reading a page of text - is still just that, a PASSIVE experience. The optimal scenario is tying lively and entertaining animation with interactivity - allowing the user to take part in the action. That's how marketers can best take advantage of the space.

Jeff Fogliano
Director, Interactive Strategies
Wilson RMS

over 5 years ago

Doug Kessler

Doug Kessler, Director at VelocitySmall Business Multi-user

Nie one. We've been using animation for a while for our clients -- it's perfect for tech products where it often takes nine paragraphs to explain a concept.

over 5 years ago

Guy Harvey

Guy Harvey, Marketing Consultant - Social Media and Media Relations at Human Factors International

We've been doing the scribe animation style and they are all generate many more views than our talking head videos. This one has been quite successful for us:

The ROI of User Experience
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O94kYyzqvTc&feature=related

BTW scribes are cheaper generally than other types of animation. We've had a huge price range quoted to us, so do shop around. As with anything a bigger agency will charge you many times more and a small boutique.

over 5 years ago

Guy Harvey

Guy Harvey, Marketing Consultant - Social Media and Media Relations at Human Factors International

Also interaction was mentioned above. Interaction can be low tech. We offer a PDF poster of the animations and many viewers have told us they have printed them out and posted them in their offices. We've had requests to make the posters available in larger sizes.

over 5 years ago

Guy Harvey

Guy Harvey, Marketing Consultant - Social Media and Media Relations at Human Factors International

Jeff, can you give some examples of interactivity. We are interested in doing this. I looked at some of the new Youtube campaigns. Of course cost is a concern for us.

over 5 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

hawa

uhdgdyyygvccydfjaaaaghyedggggggjhzgvtjeqyyyyefqwtgefjxcvtyeqqqqqqqqqqqqxftwxfyqwtejeeeeeeeeeeeetjefahhhjjjjjjetuytrwiaettttttvccdjksudtgtecvbxznnnnnnnnnmmmmmmmmmmmms

about 5 years ago

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Daily_pulse_signup_wide

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Daily Pulse newsletter. Each weekday, you ll receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.