{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Social media is big. Mobile is big. So it shouldn't come as any surprise that the number of consumers using their mobile phones to interact with popular social media hubs like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn is growing rapidly.

According to comScore, the number of mobile users in the United States ages 13 and up who accessed a social networking or blog website has grown a whopping 37% in the past year.

What's more: nearly 50% of these users are social networking on a daily basis using their mobile devices.

Leading the charge is Facebook, which now has a mobile audience in the U.S. fast-approaching 60m monthly. The mobile audiences of Twitter and LinkedIn aren't nearly as big, but they grew at a faster clip that Facebook in the past year to 13.4m and 5.5m, respectively.

So what are consumers doing when they're accessing social sites from their mobiles? As to be expected, they're primarily consuming content.

The three-month average of those consumers reading posts from people they know was just over 58m. But mobile social networkers aren't just watchers. A sizable portion -- over 50m a month -- used their mobile devices to produce content as well (eg. post a status update or photo), highlighting the fact that these users are quite engaged.

That engagement is potentially good news for marketers. That's because comScore found that this engagement extended to interactions involving brands and organizations. Nearly 38m mobile users are reading social posts from brands and organizations each month, 24m are retrieving coupons or deals, and nearly 20m are clicking on ads.

The key takeaway for marketers: your social strategy is part of your mobile strategy, and your mobile strategy is part of your social strategy.

Status updates and coupons distributed through Facebook and Twitter may reach users on the web, but they are increasingly going to be reaching users on their mobile devices. To ensure that you're getting the most from these interactions, you need to ensure that your messaging and calls to action work as well in the mobile context as they do in the web context.

Patricio Robles

Published 21 October, 2011 by Patricio Robles

Patricio Robles is a tech reporter at Econsultancy. Follow him on Twitter.

2377 more posts from this author

Comments (0)

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Daily_pulse_signup_wide

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Daily Pulse newsletter. Each weekday, you ll receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.