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Lego has launched a social media platform for fans, through which they can share and discuss their love of the brand.

The site, called ReBrick, is a hub for bookmarks to other sites that host user-created content about Lego.

ReBrick then acts as a discussion forum for links posted by users, who must be aged over 13.

A bookmark widget can be installed on your browser so content can easily be posted to the site, and links can also be shared through Facebook and Twitter to generate more discussion.

But rather than seeking to replace existing Lego fan sites and forums with a brand controlled platform, ReBrick has been launched in partnership with fans.

Lego consulted with fans on the site’s name and has created a communities page that links to other forums.

ReBrick is also free of advertising and Lego says it will “never be used to market Lego products so you won’t see campaigns, adverts or advertorials.”

So at first glance the site seems to be an easy, quick win for Lego.

Although still in a beta version, the site is fairly basic so probably didn’t take too much time or cost to put together - and there are several spelling errors that suggest it was written at the company's Danish headquarters.

Lego branding on ReBrick is minimal and it stresses that it is a fan community site. Though it's not clear how moderation will be dealt with at the moment, it will probably rely on users to flag up anything that breaks the ‘House Rules’ - which include a ban on spam or content relating to sex, drugs or religion.

So with ReBrick Lego is really just providing a giant directory of links to brand-related content that will be a useful tool for fans, but will also help Lego staff monitor web activity. If it wants it be anything more than that, it will need to work on engaging with fans and encouraging them to contribute.

David Moth

Published 25 January, 2012 by David Moth @ Econsultancy

David Moth is Editor and Head of Social at Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or connect via Google+ and LinkedIn

1686 more posts from this author

Comments (3)


Teodora Kostadinova, social media intern at Porter Novelli

I would have appreciated the link of the social network inserted in the text

over 4 years ago

Matt Owen

Matt Owen, Head of Social at Econsultancy

Hi Teodora, you can find the network here: http://rebrick.lego.com/



over 4 years ago


Nick Corston, Business Development Director at EHS 4D

Surprised that users have to be 13 to use this site and that Lego think that really will be the case. Haven't most kids grown out of it by then, regardless of what it says on the box.

I have 6-8 year old sons who I suspect are at the peak of their Lego adoption curve.

over 4 years ago

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