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Here's another strong example of circular thinking, this time from Bobbi Brown.

The brand announced today that it would be launching a Facebook appeal to crowdsource which shades of lip colour the company will put back into production this autumn.

When voting closes at the end of February, the shades will then be available to buy exclusively via Facebook. 

This Wednesday, founder and CEO Bobbi Brown will post a video on the company’s Facebook wall, inviting its near 250,000 fans to vote for their favourite from a list of the ten most-frequently requested colours.

Voting will be open to those in the six countries Bobbi Brown Cosmetics sells to online; the US, UK, Korea, Japan, Germany and Australia.

Max Factor was one of the first to use Facebook to sell make-up, as mentioned here in our 11 examples of f-commerce for 2012.

The app had a simple design, was full of how-to tips, beautiful images and purchasing was easy - it was very successful. Now however, the brand clearly directs people to its main retail partners Superdrug and Boots from its Facebook page, since the ‘selling direct’ tactic probably ruffled a few feathers. 

That’s can only be a good sign for Bobbi Brown however, which also works with partners, but already has strong direct sales channel in place. Its partnership with John Lewis in the UK for instance is secondary to its website.

Oscar de la Renta found success in selling its Esprit d’Oscar solid perfume ring as an exclusive on Facebook back in November. So much so that it created a second f-commerce shop to sell four ‘quote’ bracelets exclusively on Facebook in December.

It’s not yet clear whether Bobbi Brown's attempt at 'f-commerce' will simply mean clicking back to BobbiBrown.com, or whether the make-up brand will build f-commerce functionality into an app. 

Either way, this is solid thinking in terms of giving fans ownership, engaging with them in a place they already gather to discuss the brand, and then rewarding their input with a chance to buy something exclusive. 

Vikki Chowney

Published 30 January, 2012 by Vikki Chowney

Vikki is head of community at TMW. You can follow her on Twitter or Google+

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Comments (2)



It's good to see Bobbi Brown being more proactive in customer engagement. However, I often wonder why they haven't done anything with my data that they have collected and multiple times confirmed in the shop? I have a feeling that they are lacking a full engagement strategy. I am not a fan on Facebook but I buy their products on a very regular basis. Why that doesn't seem important enough? In the end of the day I am their profit.

over 4 years ago

Vikki Chowney

Vikki Chowney, Head of Social at TMW

Totally agree there. For BB and for MAC, I've registered at numerous different stores. It make you wonder - if it can't get its act together in terms of sharing existing customer data instore - what hope is there of connecting that online?

over 4 years ago

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