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Google TV apps are failing to attract downloads in large numbers, according to data from app search firm Xyologic.

The company has been tracking Google TV since August 2011 and since then 64 exclusive apps for the platform have been added.

These apps have a total install base of 4,793,000, but 4,441,000 of these were pre-installed on the devices, meaning that only 352,000 exclusive Google TV apps have been downloaded so far.

As we don’t know what Google’s download targets were when they launched the device we don’t know for certain whether this represents a failure, but it does suggest that the apps are struggling to find a market.

The figures are even more surprising as the 64 apps being tracked are specifically designed for Google TV, so they should be the most attractive to users.

The top 10 Google TV apps are:

 

Xyologic points out several problems with Google TV, including an expensive launch price of $249 and a “clunky” remote.

The low user ratings for the apps also suggest that customers don’t enjoying using the software.

Surprisingly the non-exclusive Google apps achieve higher user ratings but much lower numbers of downloads – these include Classy Fireplace, Dragon, Fly! Free, CuevanAndroid and Google Music.

The slow take-up of its apps is bad news for Google TV as it attempts to grab a foothold in the connected TV market ahead of its competitors.

Samsung has its own Smart TV range and launched the first TV app store in February 2010 – by last October it had clocked up 10m downloads and was seeing 50,000 downloads each day.

So far only LG and Sony have launched Google TV devices, and if consumers are underwhelmed it is unlikely any other manufacturers will be clamouring to integrate the technology.

David Moth

Published 14 February, 2012 by David Moth @ Econsultancy

David Moth is Editor and Head of Social at Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or connect via Google+ and LinkedIn

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