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Traffic Junction has launched a new service that turns consumers into affiliate marketers through the use of social recommendations.

After signing up to Have You Seen, consumers can send unique links to their friends and family recommending products from a range of retailers.

It is compatible with email, Facebook, Twitter and Google+, and if the recipient buys a product through the link the original user is paid commission by the merchant.

After a successful beta trial period the service already has an impressive list of merchants signed up, including Amazon, Sainsbury’s, British Airways and Nike.

Traffic Junction says that it conducted research which found that 45% of British consumers recommend products and services via email and social media, so the potential for revenue already exists. 

Commercial director Dan Pearce said that users receive 100% of the commission and can choose to share it with the person who bought the product.

“During the beta phase the most popular choice was to share the revenue with friends. The average purchase was £55 and average commission was 5%, but it will be interesting to see if that stays the same as we get more users on board.” 

Commission is paid to users through PayPal or a bank transfer, but they can only collect the money once they have earned £20 in commission.

With an average commission of £2.75 it may take a while for users to reach the £20 minimum, but Traffic Junction hopes that consumers will eventually make a habit of recommending products using Have You Seen.

We see it as being similar to the existing cashback model, but the whole process is based on referral so you can’t buy products using your own links. Therefore it brings in new customers and drives incremental revenue.

At this stage Traffic Junction does not receive any revenue from Have You Seen as it is still working out the best way to charge for the service.

It’s been born out of a profitable company so we are able to take a long term view and get the monetisation right rather than rushing it and making the wrong decision.

Have You Seen isn’t the first service to offer consumers commission for successful recommendations.

Just last week we reported on Air New Zealand’s Share & Earn scheme that offers £50 cash in return for a recommendation that leads to a share.

However Have You Seen has an impressive client list and by tapping into social media it is tailoring its service to existing consumer behaviour.

The tricky part will be getting people to sign up to the service in the first place, but considering how popular voucher sites have become in recent years that may be not such an onerous task.

David Moth

Published 25 April, 2012 by David Moth @ Econsultancy

David Moth is Editor and Head of Social at Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or connect via Google+ and LinkedIn

1686 more posts from this author

Comments (3)

David Petherick

David Petherick, Head of Digital Marketing at First Vehicle Leasing

This is a really dumb move.

People trust others' recommendations when they know that there is no ulterior motive behind that recommendation. Introduce the motivation of filthy lucre, and you introduce fake recommendations - so you destroy the credibility of the organisation offering the cash, and that of the person making the recommendation. You turn a valid recommendation into spammy cash-grubbing.

Social media succeeds because it is social, not commercial in nature. Many marketing and PR people still just don't get this - they still see social media as a shiny new channel they can use to sell stuff to people. This is a retarded, greedy and cynical initiative which I think deserves to wither and die - and Lord help them once the serious spammers cotton onto it.

over 4 years ago


Dan Pearce

Pleased to see our launch has prompted some interest and comment here on econsultancy.

It doesn't sound like David will be signing up any time soon, which is a shame because if he did he'd see that when you share an item you get three options: you can keep all the commission, split with the person who buys or pass all the commission on to the buyer. Splitting the commission is far and away the most popular option. In our beta so few people opted to keep the commission that we're considering dropping this as an option.

We also love social media, and are confident that the relationships our members have with their friends and followers is exactly why they won't "spam" them as David fears.

For all the increasing sophistication available to retailers in tracking and targeting, we feel your friends are uniquely well-placed to know what you might want to buy and to suggest where you might buy it. In return for this, Have You Seen makes the same incentives available to individuals as have been available to businesses for over a decade.

Now, got to get back to our launch and trying to prove David wrong :-) Thanks for taking the time to read the piece and comment.

over 4 years ago


Autotune Controller

Public networking is successful because it is social, not professional in characteristics. Many promotion and PR individuals still just don't get this - they still see social press as a bright new route they can use to offer things to individuals. This is a retarded, selfish and doubtful effort which I think should get to decline and die - and Master help them once the serious spammers natural cotton onto it.

over 4 years ago

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