{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.

No_results

That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.

Logo_distressed

Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Online recommendations are now considered to be more important than traditional word-of-mouth, according to a survey by Eccomplished.

Almost a third (31%) of respondents said they had read an online review before making a purchase, compared to 23% who asked for advice from friends and family.

A further 18% read comments on online articles, while just 6% sought advice on social media. Even among respondents aged 18-24 the use of social media only increases to 11%.

However the main method of research is to visit a marketplace such as Amazon “with a huge range and associated recommendations and reviews”.

The value of consumer reviews on e-commerce sites is something we have highlighted before. According to Reevoo stats, 50 or more reviews per product can mean a 4.6% increase in conversion rates. 

Similarly, iPerceptions found that 63% of customers are more likely to make a purchase from a site that has user reviews.

Eccomplished’s Quarterly survey also looked at the factors that influence consumers when they are deciding which retailer to buy from.

While consumers seek advice and information from a variety of sources when deciding which product to buy, there is one key factor that determines where people make a purchase – price.

Almost two-thirds (60%) of respondents said that they choose where to buy based on who offers them the lowest price.

The second most common reason was whether the product was in stock (39%) followed by convenient delivery methods (37%).

However when shopping for fashion items the choice of retailers is influenced by different factors. 

Less than half (46%) said price was a key factor, while promotions influenced 35% of decisions followed by available stock and convenient delivery (both 34%).

Looking at electronics, price becomes even more important (65%) as do reviews (33%).

The results of Eccomplished’s report are based on an online Omnibus of 2,000 respondents.

David Moth

Published 2 May, 2012 by David Moth @ Econsultancy

David Moth is Editor and Head of Social at Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or connect via Google+ and LinkedIn

1679 more posts from this author

Comments (10)

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Jeremy Spiller

Jeremy Spiller, MD at Econsultancy Small Business Guest AccessSmall Business Multi-user

Not sure about this. Looking at the wording carefully...

"Almost a third (31%) of respondents said they had read an online review before making a purchase, compared to 23% who asked for advice from friends and family."

That's not the same as saying people "trust" online more than they do a real world recommendation, just that they read more online than ask friends and family.

Also of course it depends on where the review is read online. Take Amazon for example. Would you trust the one or two reviews you see there for a book more than a recommendation (or put off) by a friend? Probably not. Could be wrong here though.

over 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

DISRUPTIVE Dave

Though I have skepticism towards the wording of this survey, I have a different take on the basic question at hand: is this actually a matter of online reviews VERSUS word of mouth?

Here's my post on the topic. Appreciate the article.

http://mydisruption.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/online-reviews-vs-traditional-word-of-mouth/

Best,
Dave
@MyDisruption

over 4 years ago

David Moth

David Moth, Editor & Head of Social at EconsultancyStaff

@Jeremy, I suppose we can't assume people trust online reviews more than their friends and family, but the fact that so many people are looking for product reviews online suggests they do find them useful.

over 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Steve Rivers, Founder & MD at Intelligent Reach

wish I had the stats to hand (and will try and dig them out) but at the recent e-circle event, Bazaar voice showed data to support the ecommplished research. It showed, surprisingly, that we were more likely to "trust" online reviews by strangers than we were friends or family!
Not sure I would take a recommendation from my mum on the next big gadget to acquire...much rather trust an techie setting themselves up as an online "expert" with an informative review.
As jeremy says; it depends on the product and where the review is... one thing is for certain though, expert reviews are now crucial in many consumers buying decision. If we had a friend who was an expert in every product area; I am sure they would be the most trusted, but you would have to be very lucky to keeping this kind of company...

over 4 years ago

Jeremy Spiller

Jeremy Spiller, MD at Econsultancy Small Business Guest AccessSmall Business Multi-user

Very true Steve. Recommendations online are certainly powerful even by strangers. I'm often influenced by people on sites like LoveFilm, TripAdvisor, Amazon and so on as others are and I think that the more people who provide positive or negative reports the more I believe what's written. I'm pretty sure this is also true with most people.

This is certainly an area that deserves lots of research in discovering the reasons and behaviour behind it.

As an aside, it's also fun to try and spot the spoofed ones written by authors' or hoteliers' friends and family. Usually appallingly obvious.

over 4 years ago

Jeremy Spiller

Jeremy Spiller, MD at Econsultancy Small Business Guest AccessSmall Business Multi-user

Sorry should have said very true David and Steve. Dang, where's the edit thingy when you want it?

Disruptive Dave, some good points in your blog post there. Ref point three you're correct, I'm sure there's no versus here in reality but rather multiple so called "touch points".

Online supports offline and vice versa and of course that makes it all the more complex for the attribution jockeys who have to work out exactly where to attribute the sale, first, last, a bit of each or something else.

Another fascinating area of buyer behaviour.

over 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Beth Ingason

@BethIngason - despite price always being a big force in influencing buyer behaviour, it's good to see that people also want "an easy life". This can be seen through the second highest elements being product in stock and convenient delivery.

What I can take from this, is that yes people want a good price but also the value added elements are becoming increasingly important.

over 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Martin Soler - wihphotel.com

The key concept here is "pay more attention" that's a long way from trust, use, think with etc. They just watch them more.
We checked with 13000 hotel guests in the last few month how they heard about their hotel (and thus booked there) 24% said friends and family and came #1 tripadvisor and review sites came 4th with 15%.
Now that doesn't mean the 25% didn't go check reviews, but the most important factor to the promotion was word of mouth.

over 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Martin Soler - wihphotel.com

@Steve Rivers remember it's FRIENDS and family. But if your friend has an iPhone and tells you it's the greatest thing since sliced bread. You're going to go online and read reviews - to justify the purchase - and then you'll go in and buy it. FRIENDS have a huge influence still today. Reviews can tilt the purchase to another product, however often they're used by the buyer to save face to the wife of why he bought it. Ok some of this is not based on facts but intuition.

over 4 years ago

Avatar-blank-50x50

Ryan Steinolfson

Great data,

Very interesting how much the conversion rate goes up when you have more reviews.

Quantity does matter.

I am excited to see that we are starting to come out of an SEO world to a social proof world.

Ryan

about 4 years ago

Comment
No-profile-pic
Save or Cancel
Daily_pulse_signup_wide

Enjoying this article?

Get more just like this, delivered to your inbox.

Keep up to date with the latest analysis, inspiration and learning from the Econsultancy blog with our free Daily Pulse newsletter. Each weekday, you ll receive a hand-picked digest of the latest and greatest articles, as well as snippets of new market data, best practice guides and trends research.