{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Author: Ben LaMothe

Ben LaMothe

I am a web and social media strategist with Jacksonville, Florida-based advertising and marketing consultancy Renaissance Creative, and a postgraduate student at City University London, where I am currently writing a dissertation about how mobile phone applications impact the ways news is distributed and consumed. I am based in Jacksonville, Florida.

My immediate background is in journalism. However more recently I have begun to work in the fields of social media marketing, community management, media blogging and web development. I previously worked as a web and social media specialist with corporate PR and marketing consultancy Glasshouse Partnership, where my primary role was devising web, social media and blogging strategy for corporate and individual clients.

I have also worked as a social media consultant for United Business Media, and as a web intern with Telegraph.co.uk, where I assisted in the re-launch of their blogs.

Tomorrow's news companies: small, lean and venture capitalist

Future news organisations, the ones that make it out of the recession, will look much different than pre-recession times. They'll be smaller and leaner. But if they're smart, they'll also have a big role in VC for companies developing products that could help them gain a competitive advantage.


Five reasons why consumers will reject news paywalls

Much has been said about newspapers looking more fondly at the possibility adding a paywall to their precious content so 'bloggers stop stealing it' and Google 'stops being a vampire'.

Almost all of the arguments centre around what the business side of this decision is. While that is important, the reaction of the public matters much more.


Q&A: Spot.Us founder David Cohn on crowdfunded journalism

In the search for ways to fund journalism, some organisations have flirted with the possibility of crowdfunding some stories. While there have been a few minor successes (such as the non-profit hyperlocal project MinnPost), David Cohn's Spot.Us has garnered the most attention. 


How newspapers lost the breaking news game to a Twittering 19-year-old kid

Across much of the western world, news organisations are in a fight for their life. Between Google 'stealing' their news and bloggers 'stealing their readers', things are not well in the land of news. The next challenge to news's authority is a 19-year-old kid from the Netherlands.


Opportunities for news in augmented reality and geotagging mobile applications

Like with most things iPhone-related, the sight of a new application sends people into a frenzy. However the latest development in augmented reality applications could be useful for both ecommerce and the news industry. 


Q&A: Broadersheet.com CEO Peter Clark

Earlier today I wrote about whether a news aggregator could be a success in the UK. Prospects are not good, and even Briton Nick Denton, founder of Gawker.com, says he wouldn't dare do it.

However, despite the pessimism, there exists an interest in giving it a try. The first major entrant into the UK news aggregation scene looks to be Cambridge-based Broadersheet.com.


Aggregation in the UK: Can it work?

Americans and the British are quite similar, but also quite different. Jokes that make Americans laugh may not make a British person laugh; food that a Brit might love could repulse an American; and so on. It seems the way the two nations consume news online is different, too.


The Economist launches a massive ad campaign - but is that a good thing?

The Economist launches massive ad campaignToday it was announced that the London-based current affairs/economics magazine The Economist is launching a far-reaching ad campaign aimed at broadening its readership. It's a unique title in a unique position with an equally unique readership. But an ad campaign could spoil that...


The economics of free web content

It is the hot topic in media circles: should news organisations give away their content on the web for free? This week saw a few posts by influential bloggers and media commenters on the subject. Here's a round-up.


The next newspaper crisis: shoddy website design

Since the floor has fallen out of print circulations at many newspapers, editors are paying greater attention to the layout of their web sites. What they're finding isn't pretty.

For years if a newspaper had a website, it most likely served as a digital dumping ground for the print product. Design and functionality wasn't a key concern because most readers still got their news in print. Times have changed, but unfortunately many newspapers remain unprepared.