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Author: Donnie Kerrigan

Donnie Kerrigan

What can Nintendo teach us about content marketing?

Nintendo’s third quarter financial results aren’t normally essential reading for a content marketer, but this quarter is different.

Nintendo is struggling; the Wii U has been a disaster (I love it, but sales have been terrible) and the DS isn’t selling in the numbers it was.

Mobile disrupted Nintendo’s market and the ’what can save Nintendo?’ debate is coming down to whether they should take their amazing IP (Mario, Zelda, Donkey Kong, et al) to mobile platforms they don’t own, or to fight for the space they’re in.

Well it has decided to bet on mobile, but not in the way you might have predicted, and how it plays out could be interesting for content marketers.

Image copyright of dzingeek

Is making a successful game an art or a science?

The makers of Candy Crush Saga and Puzzle & Dragons seem to have a winning formula that should be attractive to brands looking for a guarantee of success with games.

But is the creation of a successul game a science or an art?

Branded for life? (Image copyright of lincolnblues)

Branded for life? Branded games as a service

Over the last few years, games have increasingly moved from being products with a shelf-life to something more akin to services; with players as subscribers and game studios as service providers.

Given the opportunity for long term fans, should branded games do the same?

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