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Author: Ryan Sommer

Ryan Sommer

Ryan Sommer is a web veteran and recovering expat working in the tech industry with an emphasis on social media, content marketing and SEO. Having worked as a products intern at Wired magazine, and subsequently in specialized fields of the communications industry, he has developed expertise in both hardware and software-related tech, music, media and more.

Specialties: Branding, identity, community building, community relations, market research, social media relations, user acquisition, web browsers, mobile, desktop software, social networking, web standards, open source, identity/OpenID, design, music, gadgets, blogging, SEO, content marketing

ICOA / Google Scandal: PRWeb’s fault, or an online culture obsessed with the ‘Big Four’?

The genie is now out of the bottle on a mass scale around something that most content marketers have known for several years running: to be noticed in today’s online news world, you must stand on the back of giants: Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Twitter.

UPDATE: Note that Techcrunch, The Next Web, Silicon Alley Insider, GigaOm, AllthingsD and The Associated Press ALL posted based off the fraudulent press release, not just Techcrunch

In case you’ve missed the news, the search, public relations and online journalism industries are all in an uproar over a fake press release that was written and distributed over PRWeb in order to generate a stock boost for the offending company.

At the center of the scandal, ICOA Wireless, a U.S. provider of wired and wireless broadband internet networks, who yesterday distributed a release claiming that the company had been acquired by Google for $400m.

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Six tips for optimising content to hit LinkedIn Today

LinkedIn Today was launched over a year and a half ago as a way to use data from 175M+ professionals to surface relevant stories in specific verticals on the LinkedIn platform. 

Currently, the content that makes it through the algorithm is selectively published by a small team of editors (or curators some might say) in New York City, and the resulting traffic – if your content is placed on the homepage – is considered a bit of a Holy Grail for content marketers.

Here are six tips to help you hit the feed!

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Q&A: Mark Schaefer part two: how to ensure your content is noticed online

Mark Schaefer is the author of two best-selling books on social media and the opportunities and challenges present for brands and individuals online.

This is part two of our interview with him. You can find part one here.

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Six tools content marketers should be using daily

Journalists and news creators, who by nature are at the top of the social news cycle, as well as content creators for brands that offer value to their communities should be aware of these six great tools.

As part of my role here at Econsultancy as Content Marketing Executive, I was immediately immersed in product demos and in-person meetings for new products in the burgeoning social web discovery space.

Here are six immediate standouts from the pack that I feel other content marketers should be using and why.

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Q&A: Mark Schaefer on creating web content that creates a reaction. Part one


Mark Schaefer
is the author of two best-selling books on social media and the opportunities and challenges present for brands and individuals online.

The Tao of Twitter was self-published in 2011 (Updated in 2012), and Return on Influence followed in March 2012, published by McGraw-Hill Professional.

We caught up with Mark while he was in the U.K. promoting Return on Influence and spoke about content marketing, influencer tracking tools and more in this two-part series.

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The future of content marketing? Consult the feeds

Feed. Where I grew up in rural Santa Clara California, this meant alfalfa we shovelled to our horses.

Now, the word has an entirely different meaning to a global world of young digital natives, and understanding/collecting data on how these types of feeds are accessed and interacted with is going to be big business.

Where do you learn about breaking events? Consult the Twitter feed. Need to get caught up on family and friend’s whereabouts after a long- stint of no communication, that’s a Facebook feed.

For shopping you have your Pinterest feed – or, more importantly your followers Pinterest feed in order to get the latest visual porn around the products and brands that matter to you most. For personal expression, you have your Instagram or Tumblr feed.

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How small businesses can use Pinterest for a content marketing boost

Being from San Francisco, I’ve always had a soft spot for the underdog small business or high street boutique, and coming from a social media background, I love to stay on top of new ways social can help this market segment.

In the past, we've looked into how Pinterest can be used for link building and blogger outreach, as well as some of the big players getting involved with the new niche social network.

But can Pinterest still even be considered niche?

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