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Author: Stefan Tornquist

Stefan Tornquist

Stefan Tornquist is an experienced entrepreneur, new media researcher and business manager. He's built a reputation as a thought leader in online marketing, as well as essential business issues, such as how to approach marketing and branding in an economic downturn. Stefan has authored dozens of reports across a wide range of online marketing tactics.

In February of 2010, Stefan joined Econsultancy as research director (later Vice President, Research) for the US. Econsultancy is a subscription-based online publisher and community with offices in London and New York. With 85,000 global members, it offers best practice reports, analysis and insight into the business of digital marketing and e-commerce. Econsultancy also trained more than 3,000 people last year via public and custom in-house trainings. Its teams in the US and UK run more than 100 events each year, ranging from roundtables to large conferences for 300+ delegates.

Tornquist is frequently quoted in the trade and business press. His commentary has been featured in the Wall St. Journal, Business Week and AdAge, as well as virtually every industry outlet. He's been a guest on CNBC's Street Signs, National Public Radio's Studio 360 and is a regular contributor to YourBusinessChannel out of the UK. Stefan maintains an active speaking schedule and has been a featured or keynote speaker at more than 100 corporate and industry events, as well as hundreds of webinars and virtual events. He's a member of the Internet Oldtimers Foundation and serves on their Membership Board.

Native American Lessons for Community Building - New Report

In the first of three reports, Digital Vision winner Allison Saur explores the power and role of Naming in building a digital community. Using the template of native tribes, the report outlines best practices for when and how to use naming to increase the loyalty of group members.

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Top 4.5 marketing lessons of the Rush Limbaugh PR fiasco

In less than a week, political radio host Rush Limbaugh has seen upwards of 30 sponsors flee his radio program. Their migration began in response to a public boycott campaign which has relied heavily on social media.

The actions and inactions of Limbaugh and the companies involved provide lessons for marketers in how to respond to crises, buy media and even outflank competitors.

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Marketer versus machine discussions dominate OMS 2012

If there was a theme to Econsultancy's session at the Online Marketing Summit in San Diego, it may have been marketer versus machine. 

We looked at recent research studies that explore some of the major trends in marketing and technology and often, success has more to do with people and priorities than the technologies they use. 

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Q&A: DJ Waldow on community building

Community is a word used all too often in the social marketing world, but what does it mean exactly?

What are the different kinds of community that companies are building or assisting online, and how do they contribute to business goals?

We discuss the answers with DJ Waldow, the author of Econsultancy's new series of reports on the topic.

The first report, Starting a Community, is available now to Bronze members and above.

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What's your Digital Vision?

At Econsultancy, we publish new ideas and research every day, but digital marketing is evolving too quickly to think that we have all the answers…or all the questions.

We want to know what creative people throughout the industry have on their minds and reward them for it.

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Seven steps to sublime (or at least successful) subject lines

In a world increasingly driven by content that's hiding in an email or behind a Tweet, subject lines are more important than ever.

In advance of a talk later this week at the Internet Marketing Conference in New York, here are some of the approaches and best practices in crafting better subject lines.

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Q&A: Ritesh Patel on Saying “No” to Group Discounting and “Yes” to Social Media

Ritesh Patel is renowned as a marketer specializing in pharma. But today, we ask him about the lessons in digital marketing an up-market Indian restaurant.

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Agree to Disagree: TV vs Digital for reaching a large audience

We recently asked marketers whether TV was still necessary for reaching the masses. They disagreed with that idea by a large margin...but are they right? How do digital and TV match up when scale is the number one variable?

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App v mobile web

Moments in Needless Bi-Polarity: Apps vs the mobile web

Apps vs Mobile webMaybe it's because we in the media crave dramatic tension, or because anyone on the sell side of mobile has a vested interest, but the mobile web vs. apps debate is still raging. It shouldn't be...

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How wise is the "conventional wisdom?"

In a discipline that's changing as rapidly as digital marketing, new ideas spread rapidly and even unproven concepts can have immense influence. They have the power to shape strategies and the budgets attached to them.

Sometimes those hot ideas turn into the next big thing, while others fizzle. But which ones? Econsultancy wants to know what you think.

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Optimism and uncertainty in media: the C-suite looks to the future

Media Growth Trends Cover

A new study by Econsultancy explores the opportunities and challenges in media and publishing using feedback from nearly 500 media company CEOs and senior executives.

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Our fatal attraction to numbers: Five data-related traps (Part one)

Marketers are adrift in a sea of data. Do we need a bigger boat? Some of the most common online data pitfalls are easy to identify, but hard to avoid. In Part One of this two-part series, we look at why 72.8% of surveys aren't valid -- and the phenomenon of testing against the wrong metric.

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