Posts tagged with Accessibility

ashley firth

A day in the life of... Head of Frontend Development at Octopus Energy

Ashley Firth is head of front-end development at Octopus Energy, a challenger brand that has invested heavily in solar and aims to provide a "better experience for [the energy customer] through transparency, honesty and simplicity."

Let's hear what a day in Ashley's life is like, and remember that you can hear more from Ashley and Octopus Energy at 2018's Festival of Marketing, where he'll be speaking about their approach to web accessibility.

0 comments
map

Considering colour blindness in UX design (with five examples)

Despite it affecting approximately one in 12 men and one in 200 women, colour blindness is often disregarded when designing for optimum user experience and accessibility. 

2 comments
" "

UK retailers still failing to meet web accessibility standards

At the end of 2016 the BBC reported that retailers could be "missing out on £249bn because many are inaccessible to disabled customers". 

But what about the digital high street?

4 comments
Padlock with key being inserted into it

It’s time to make web accessibility integral to your project lifecycle

It is imperative that accessibility considerations are integrated at each stage of a project's lifecycle, and are not treated as an arbitrary exercise.

But why is that, and what happens if they aren't?

1 comment
typography

How typography will help your responsive website stand out

The best responsive designs come with good, considered typography.

As far as I am concerned, there are two factors for great typography. The first one is personality, the second one is semantic.

5 comments
accessibility

Making your HTML accessible for the visually impaired

Accessibility is an important topic in web design, but one that previously hasn't been covered on the Econsultancy blog.

To rectify this omission, I'll be writing a series of posts exploring how to make your websites more accessible from the outset. 

In this first post we’ll look at creating a design that people with visual impairments will hopefully find easy to use.

6 comments

Six more tips to attract and keep older web users

You would not knowingly ignore 80% of the online market in the UK, would you? 

Yet many websites, generally designed by younger people, forget that older consumers may not share their abilities or tastes. So their websites probably don't work as well as they should for the growing army of silver surfers.

However, designing to cater for the aging population is not always straightforward. Last year, Econsultancy’s David Moth spelt out six sensible tips ranging from increasing the font size to avoiding major navigation changes

As a senior facing yet another birthday (is it really a year since the last one?) I have six more tips to help younger designers appeal to that increasingly wealthy post-kids generation with time and money on its hands.

5 comments
Global Accessibility Awareness Day Logo

Five quick checks for your website’s accessibility

Today is Global Accessibility Awareness Day, an initiative to get people to talk, think and learn about digital accessibility.  

So why not try out these five steps to see how well your site is meeting the accessibility requirements

2 comments
iWonder across devices

New BBC interactive guides: responsive, dynamic and accessible web design

iWonder is the evocative name for the BBC’s new interactive guides. The name conjures childlike enquiry (I wonder!), ‘90s crisps (Golden Wonder) and fits nicely with the Beeb’s and Apple’s use of the stunted ‘iProductname’ format.

The guides are the BBC’s new content format, described as 'sit forward', allowing the user to learn by doing.

They organise video and audio, infographics, text and activities into stories.

I’ve been having a play with the guides and given some brief thoughts below. Do go and check them out, they’re a powerful tool for schoolchildren or older autodidacts.

2 comments
ofcom logo

More disabled consumers online: a timely reminder of accessibility

Nearly twelve million people in the UK have a limiting long-term illness, impairment or disability.

Ofcom recently published its Disabled Consumers’ Ownership of Communications Services Report, which reveals younger disabled people now have roughly the same level of internet access as the non-disabled.

What are the common mistakes of accessibility and what does the landscape look like for disabled consumers' access to the web?

0 comments

Style and substance: two (accessible) websites which have it all

My last blog for Econsultancy aimed to dispel the myth that accessible websites must compromise on aesthetics.

It elicited quite a response with many readers agreeing and a number asking for examples of sites that combine both elements.

Before I point you in the direction of two websites that are both highly accessible and attractively designed, it’s important to remember that beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Furthermore, the aesthetics is the result of the final product. When broken down into its components the beauty is difficult to see. It’s only when those parts all come together that the beauty is evident.

1 comment

Making websites accessible without sacrificing aesthetics

Fifteen years after the Web Accessibility Initiative was launched, which aimed to improve web usability for those with disabilities, online accessibility is still widely ignored.

Far too often there is a belief that a compromise must be made between accessibility and an attractive design.

As a result, a myriad of misconceptions have emerged, often preventing people from making a determined effort to integrate accessibility into their websites. 

10 comments