Posts tagged with Alice.Com

Alice.com raises $3.6m in funding

E-commerce upstart Alice.com announced last night that it has raised $3.6m in funding.

The company, which we reviewed in 2009, operates a marketplace through which consumers can purchase household goods, such as batteries and soap.

It recently surpassed 1m customer accounts, and last year expanded into Europe with the acquisition of Spain-based Koto.com.

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Proctor & Gamble's new e-store markets directly to consumers

Household goods manufacturers have long sold their products to consumers through middle men, whether it be pharmacies, chains, department stores or individual resellers. But in a world increasingly connected to the internet, why not go direct to consumers? 

That's an approach that Proctor & Gamble is trying with a new site that went live today. Consumers can now purchase any P&G product for a flat shipping rate of $5. But do consumers have the kind of manufacturer loyalty that will make this a popular shopping method? P&G thinks it's worth finding out.

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Site review: Alice.com

Having sold social search engine Jellyfish to Microsoft in 2007, founders Brian Wiegand and Mark McGuire started work on Alice.com, which launched in beta this week.

Alice.com provides an online marketplace for users to buy a whole range of household goods; nappies, batteries, soap and more, and for CPG manufacturers to sell directly to customers. I've been trying the site out... 

Alice.com homepage

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Never run out of toilet paper again

alice.com logoDown to one square of TP? Is the dog out of kibble, the soap in the bathroom down to a sliver, and you can't find an envelope to mail that letter or a bandage for your blister? Don't blame Alice if you can't think, plan or shop ahead.

Alice.com launched today in beta. The new commerce site sells "household essentials," those necessary staples such as soap and shampoo, tissues and detergent, pet food and aluminum foil...and doesn't charge a shipping fee. Instead, they rely on customer loyalty -- the fact that consumers need to keep buying all this stuff

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