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Posts tagged with Augmented Reality

vr

Augmented Reality vs. Virtual Reality: where should brands focus?

Augmented reality and virtual reality are the source of growing buzz.

For brands interested in exploring them, which is the more worthy technology?

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Six Premier League football clubs with innovative digital strategies

You need only look at the trending topics on any Saturday from August to May to know that football is a big deal on social media.

Premier League clubs weren’t slow to take advantage of this fact, so digital and social channels are now firmly part of the marketing mix for most teams.

To give some insight in this topic, I’ve rounded up a few interesting campaigns which show how Premier League teams are using digital to interact with fans.

For more on this theme, read our posts looking at Premier League clubs that use Twitter's Vine and the arduous task of buying football tickets online.

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target app

Target and Argos: Is the multichannel catalogue taking off?

There are many retailers that have trialled image recognition technology in their catalogues.

The tech allows the retailer's app users to scan and shop or access additional content. So far, it seems to have been a test-and-learn activity from brands such as Net-A-Porter (as part of their magazine, Porter) and IKEA (which has focused on additional content rather than commerce).

Target is new to shoppable catalogues this month and Argos has further enhanced its now Aurasma-powered offering. Both of these huge retailers I think have found good use cases.

Let's take a look.

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blippar

Why the phrase 'augmented reality' should be retired

I’m going to nail my colours to the mast. I think augmented reality (AR) technology is already big and can be massive.

The only thing is, I don’t think its best use is in augmenting reality, per se.

Where AR apps have a big future is the creation of a ‘physical world domain’. That’s a phrase used by Ambarish Mitra, CEO of Blippar. It essentially means using objects as the physical keys to information or rewards online.

Blippar signed up with Pepsi and Coca Cola recently and this feels like a game changer. With QR codes failing to be implemented properly in many cases (with bad placement, instructions, URLs, or landing pages), the company could be well-placed to own the discovery and reward space.

FMCG (fast moving consumer goods) feels like a proving ground for this technology (and all reports of the number of scans are good, so far), with immense numbers of units providing marketing real estate to rival any other ‘channel’.

So why might it be so powerful as a tag or key, but not as augmenter?

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The A to Z of mobile marketing: 26 trends to inspire you

2014 is another exciting year for mobile.

With many new technologies coming to market, emotional investment in our devices along with usage is at an all time high.

This is the definitive A to Z guide to mobile marketing and commerce. Enjoy...

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QR code

Three mobile marketing trends that didn't live up to the hype

Mobile marketing trends come and go, just like the changing of the seasons and the tides of the sea.

Some stick around and become established marketing channels in their own right, such as SMS or mobile apps, but all too often new mobile technologies burn brightly for a short period before withering and dying.

With this in mind, I’ve rounded up three mobile marketing trends that have so far failed to live up to the hype. I’m not saying they’re dead yet, but they’re on shaky ground.

For a similar grumblings about mobile trends, read my post looking at 12 usability flaws that are spoiling the mobile web.

Or alternatively, expand your knowledge of this topic by downloading the Econsultancy Mobile Marketing and Commerce Report 2013...

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Six mobile marketing alternatives to QR codes

Oh QR code, how did you fall from grace so soon?

Perhaps it was around the same time that advertisers started putting really tiny ones on posters, plastered on Underground walls on the wrong side of the platform, thereby making users dangle their arms over the train tracks smartphone in hands, oblivious to an oncoming train about to rip their arms off.

I might have made that last bit up, but if you live outside of London you’d be forgiven for thinking it’s true.

Perhaps I need a more scientific approach to gauge popular consensus on the use of QR codes.

Here’s a flow chart recently shared around the internet that helps companies decide if they might need a QR code or not.

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Image by Turkletom (http://www.flickr.com/photos/turkletom/)

Three reasons why digital marketers should revisit augmented reality in 2014

AR (augmented reality) gets a tough rap in digital marketing circles. To date, the technology is still most visible powering children’s games and providing 3D thrills that use your tablet or smartphone to layer digital information or graphics over real-world objects. 

With wearable tech exploding off the tradeshow floor at CES, and Google Glass finally infiltrating mainstream press, it’s time to take a serious look at augmented reality in modern marketing and the enterprise.

Here are three reasons why I’m betting on seeing more use of AR from savvy brands and agencies in the year(s) to come.

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Augmented reality

When can I buy Google Glass?

Last year, the Econsultancy blog featured several articles about Google Glass, as did most digital and business blogs, cognisant of the technology's hold on the public's imagination.

I rounded up a collection of apps and postulated as to what affect they might have on society. A few of our Editorial team got to try Glass, too (courtesy of Somo).

This year, Glass still has us rapt. CES unveiled some third parties' intentions for Glass and a wide variety of wearables were debuted, showing the trend is not abating. Elsewhere, most national news outlets' covered the failed citation against a Californian woman caught driving whilst wearing Glass (there was no evidence the device was switched on).

As the internet has become widely used globally and consumers are now very comfortable using the web for a variety of functions, the idea of connected devices has started to feel less alien, too. The internet of things, particularly the connected home also made more noise at CES this year.

So I thought it was time for a 'where are we at?' style post, to look at the latest iterations of third party Google Glass apps, new developments from Google itself and even perhaps to predict when we'll actually see people using Glass, outside of Silicon Valley.

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doge

13 things I learnt about the interweb last year

Let me tell you, it's more than just the excellent doge.

Last year I started writing for the Econsultancy blog and it’s allowed me to go to a lot of cool conferences and learn about some new things, from Google Glass to big automated email and CRM systems.

Here are some of the things that stuck in my mind from last year and perhaps a few things you might not know about digital and the interweb.

For regular followers of our interweb anti-format post (crazy stuff from across the web), don’t worry, it will return next week.

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10 interesting digital marketing statistics we've seen this week

Here are some of the most interesting digital marketing statistics we saw last week.

Statistics include real-time bidding, email marketing, paid search, responsive design, integrated marketing and augmented reality.

For more digital marketing stats, check out our Internet Statistics Compendium.

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children using british museum's new app in the parthenon gallery

The British Museum: five lessons in augmented reality

Since 2009, the British Museum has educated youngsters in Bloomsbury via its Samsung Digital Discovery Centre (SDDC). It’s free, and is the most extensive on-site digital learning programme of any UK museum. 

I went along to the British Museum last week to see the launch of a new image recognition and augmented reality (AR) app, A Gift for Athena, helping kids to engage with the museum’s Parthenon gallery. 

The app, built by Gamar, is simple in premise and use, but also a lot of fun, showing that augmented reality can succeed when applied in the right manner. 

In this post I’ll discuss why the app works, and what’s needed to succeed with AR.

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