{{ searchResult.published_at | date:'d MMMM yyyy' }}

Loading ...
Loading ...

Enter a search term such as “mobile analytics” or browse our content using the filters above.


That’s not only a poor Scrabble score but we also couldn’t find any results matching “”.
Check your spelling or try broadening your search.


Sorry about this, there is a problem with our search at the moment.
Please try again later.

Posts tagged with Aws

One cloud to rule them all? Amazon launches AWS Marketplace

According to a report from research firm DeepField Networks, Amazon's AWS cloud now powers 1% of the internet. If this number is anywhere close to accurate, it's a stunning figure, particularly when one considers that Amazon started as an online retailer of books.

But Amazon's cloud ambitions are huge, and in an effort to grow its cloud even more, Amazon today launched the AWS Marketplace, a one-stop shop for AWS customers to, with a single click, purchase and deploy cloud servers running the software they need.


Amazon launches AWS cloud search service

Amazon's AWS cloud already has one of the broadest sets of offerings and the ecommerce giant continues to expand the services it offers with today's launch of a new AWS service, CloudSearch.

Based on the search technology that powers search on Amazon.com, CloudSearch, as the name implies, is a cloud-based, fully managed search facility.


HP set to enter cloud market, but can it compete with Amazon?

Amazon isn't just the world's largest ecommerce company. Thanks to its Amazon Web Services (AWS) offering, Amazon has become the 800 pound gorilla of cloud computing.

It's a role it shows no intention of relinquishing.


Amazon lowers AWS pricing

When it comes to the cloud, Amazon has fast become an 800 pound gorilla thanks to Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Sure, it's had some problems, but thanks to the breadth and depth of its offering, and its pricing, Amazon continues to be the go-to choice for many companies looking to put their applications in the cloud.


Microsoft's cloud faces outage

Cloud computing may be significantly changing the way many companies do business on the internet, but it isn't perfect.

As we've seen time and time again, the cloud infrastructure can fail, leaving users which made poor architectural decisions in a bind. There are also security and financial concerns that the cloud raises, some of which companies fail to deal with intelligently.

1 comment

Oracle gives into the cloud

Oracle CEO Larry Ellison hasn't exactly been the biggest proponent of 'the cloud'. In fact, in 2008 he went so far as to state that the cloud is "the Webvan of computing".

To be sure, the cloud isn't without its problems, and as a buzzword, it's a bit worn.

But the rise of services like Amazon AWS has proven one thing: the cloud, for better or worse, is here to stay.

1 comment

Spot instances a double-edged sword for EC2 customers

In late 2009, Amazon introduced a new way for AWS customers to purchase its Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) service: spot instances.

Instead of buying an instance outright at a fixed price, the price of a spot instance is determined by supply and demand.

So long as your bid for the instance is above the current spot price, you have a fully functional Amazon EC2 instance at your disposal.

1 comment

Amazon adds a caching offering to AWS

When it comes to building high-performing web applications, there are plenty of tools that developers can employ to improve efficiency and reduce unnecessary resource utilization.

Caching is typically one of those tools, and in the market for caching solutions, the open-source Memcached is, for many developers, sort of like a trusty old hammer.

Originally developed for use on LiveJournal, Memcached is still used by some of the internet's largest sites, including Facebook.


In the cloud, when it rains FAIL, it pours

If one trend has captured the hearts and minds of internet executives, entrepreneurs and developers alike over the past several years, it's cloud computing. And when it comes to market leaders, at the front of the pack is Amazon.

Its suite of offerings, known as Amazon Web Services (AWS), has attracted some of the most prominent consumer internet services, including Twitter, as well as a slew of up-and-coming startups looking for the ability to scale in their early days without Facebook-like funding. Through its cloud, companies can do everything from run resource-intensive applications to send high volumes of email.