Posts tagged with Cards

Simple Twitter experiments to restore that boxfresh feeling

There is nothing sadder than reflecting on the earlier days of a community or service and complaining about how much things have changed.

So let’s just take it for granted that there’s an element of that in this but not dwell too much. 

Instead, I’d like to focus on something more important: how you shake things up when the timeline that used to delight and inform you begins to feel saggy and boring.

Think of it like marriage-counselling for a tool that many of us spend more time with than our significant others.

(If you have your own tips, let me know.)

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The emergence of real-time video on social media

Amplification has been a big word in social media for over a year now and Twitter's Amplify product allows advertisers and broadcasters to push photos and video through Twitter Cards.

Facebook has reduced the reach of organic posts from companies and is consequently providing a clearer proposition to advertisers, particular with some of its mobile and location-based products.

Grabyo is a UK company that provides a video platform working with Twitter (through Twitter Amplify) and Facebook to allow sharing of real-time video clips on social media. 

In a new report, the company has analysed 2,500 clips of live TV shared on social by major broadcasters and rights holders between September 2013 and March 2014.

Here are some of the findings.

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Twitter Cards: in the right place at the right time to create a new kind of web

What’s the difference between a tweet and a blog post? What about a collection of tweets and a website?

You may start with a description of 140 characters, but while this famous limit still applies, it’s hardly the point anymore.

Twitter Cards (RIP 'tweets'), are best thought of as 'action+caption' and may quickly become the smallest meaningful and shareable unit of the web.

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Augmented reality

When can I buy Google Glass?

Last year, the Econsultancy blog featured several articles about Google Glass, as did most digital and business blogs, cognisant of the technology's hold on the public's imagination.

I rounded up a collection of apps and postulated as to what affect they might have on society. A few of our Editorial team got to try Glass, too (courtesy of Somo).

This year, Glass still has us rapt. CES unveiled some third parties' intentions for Glass and a wide variety of wearables were debuted, showing the trend is not abating. Elsewhere, most national news outlets' covered the failed citation against a Californian woman caught driving whilst wearing Glass (there was no evidence the device was switched on).

As the internet has become widely used globally and consumers are now very comfortable using the web for a variety of functions, the idea of connected devices has started to feel less alien, too. The internet of things, particularly the connected home also made more noise at CES this year.

So I thought it was time for a 'where are we at?' style post, to look at the latest iterations of third party Google Glass apps, new developments from Google itself and even perhaps to predict when we'll actually see people using Glass, outside of Silicon Valley.

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