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Posts tagged with Cnn

How can we improve content discovery networks? A study of clickbait

I recently made a fuss about a mobile advertising experience I had with CNN Money.

My gripe was about UX but also about the poor quality of content discovery networks.

So, I thought I would experiment in visiting some of the clickbait on these networks. Here we go...


Snapchat adds deep linking but should publishers take the bait?

Earlier this year, Snapchat launched Discover, "a new way to explore Stories from different editorial teams."

Today, Discover, which counts major publishers like CNN, Hearst, Comedy Central and Vice as content partners, looks like it may be one of Snapchat's most consequential product offerings.


What we learned from trying Google Glass

Here at Econsultancy we try to write about Google Glass when we can, because we know it’s of great interest to marketers, and indeed the rest of humanity.

On Friday some of Econsultancy’s Content team tried Google Glass at Somo’s incredible gadget room in its London HQ, where they develop new tech uses for clients (thanks, Somo).

It was fun, but also revealing, so I thought I’d share some of what we saw and felt.

For the complete run down on Glass functions, you can visit Google’s help centre.


12 things Google Glass will destroy (with 13 apps)

Google Glass for the majority is a long way off. In fact, if you go to the ‘MyGlass’ app page on Google Play, you’ll see, for those without Glass:

..there's a picture of a puppy in pyjamas. So not a total waste of time after all.

Puppies aside, Google professes Glass (like all G products) was built to break down barriers. The idea is to make things easier and more seamless; to free up hands and time.

Here at Econsultancy, the high-falutin’ Editorial team has some philosophical concerns. Our Head of Social, Matt, was quick to point out that Glass will essentially create a simulacrum of the world, a sort of 1:1 map that is neither real nor artifice (I direct you to Borges’ On Exactitude in Science).

Whilst we’re fans of Google, we’re sceptical about just what third party developers will come up with for Glass

There’s arguably never been such a product; a piece of hardware that fundamentally alters perception and interaction with the world. Even smartphones are a false precedent for Glass, but perhaps do offer a dirty window on our increased device reliance (dare I smush these words together and create ‘deviance’?).

Even with well-intentioned developers, might third party apps add unwanted lustre to our already homogenous cityscapes?

In this post I make some philosophical predictions, as seen through some nascent apps. Of course, it’s a lot more fun to cast concerns with a negative spin; forgive the hack approach!

Here’s what Google Glass will destroy…..


Rumour: CNN to purchase Mashable for $200m

The next big (read: nine-figure) consumer internet acquisition may involve an unexpected buyer - CNN.

According to Reuters' Felix Salmon, the Time Warner-owned cable news network could announce as early as Tuesday that it is acquiring Mashable, one of the most popular tech/social media blogs for a figure that could be north of $200m.


To prevent cord cutting, cable networks embrace the web

Are cable customers ditching their cords, or shaving them? While the debate over what cable customers are doing and planning to do with their cords continues, one thing is clear: cable players are concerned.

So in an effort to prevent cord cutting, they're increasing looking to find ways to embrace the channel cord cutting is blamed on the internet.


Television and social media: a match made in Hollywood?

Executives are frequently encouraged to adopt a multichannel approach to business because, they’re told, doing so will produce a result that’s greater than the sum of its parts. but is this really the case?

If any industry can prove that you can put two channels together in interesting ways and produce powerful results, it’s the television industry, which is increasingly finding a variety of ways to embrace an ever-social internet.


The democratization of news media? Perhaps not

Back when social media first burst into the mainstream in a big way and popular Web 2.0 services like Digg and Flickr were the subject of articles touting phrases such as "the wisdom of crowds" and buzzwords like "democratization," it might have seemed that the web was truly changing the fundamental dynamics of information distribution.

But a new CNN study hints that some of the hype around this notion has been overblown.


Craigslist's growing PR problem

Craigslist is an internet icon, and it's a unique one. Despite the rapid evolution of the internet over the past decade, Craigslist in 2010 still looks like Craigslist in 2000. The fact that Craigslist has managed to thrive largely its original form is a testament to the value it offers.

But Craigslist is under assault. And it's not competitors who are attacking. It's politicians and the media. The reason: adult service ads which many say are frequently used in the illegal trafficking of women and children. And which many argue Craigslist continues to allow because they're a lucrative source of revenue.


CNN's irrational fear of social media

CNN has a big problem: its ratings are dropping. Big time. A New York Times article this week pointed out that CNN's main hosts have lost almost 50% of their viewers over the past year.

And while CNN's viewership is plummeting, its competitors are gaining viewers. Several FOX News hosts have registered year-over-year viewership gains in the range of 25-50%. And lest you think the drop in CNN's viewership is primarily the result of demographics or political preferences, CNN is even being beat out at certain hours by MSNBC and CNN's lightweight news channel, HLN.


CNN's Jonathan Klein: TV Ratings don't matter. We're competing with social networks.

It's not unusual to hear someone from a television network that's not in first place to claim that ratings don't matter. And CNN's Jonathan Klein is no different.

Speaking at the 2010 Media Summit in New York, the president of CNN said that television ratings don't paint an accurate picture of his network's strengths. But his reasoning is interesting — it's not because FOX is beating them there, but due to competition from online sources that aren't being tracked by the Nielsen ratings.


Reuters targets consumers with its new design

Tis the season to redesign. CNN recently launched a new look for CNN.com, and now news service Reuters has launched a new look for Reuters.com.

But while CNN.com's redesign was all about the content, Reuters' redesign is all about the focus. The new Reuters.com design is all about one thing: making the website a much more attractive destination for consumers.