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Posts tagged with Competition

COMPETITION: What is your biggest joined-up marketing challenge?

Nine out of 10 companies understand the importance of creating a joined up customer experience, which delights patrons and helps staff to maintain high standards.

That statistic comes from some research we did in association with Foviance last November. So how many of our 500+ survey respondents said they had achieved such a high level of integration? A mere 20 of them: just 4%. As such it is patently clear that there is a huge gap between where companies want to be, versus where they’re at. 

Below, I have listed a few common hurdles in joining up business activities across channels. We’d especially love to hear about your own challenges. In fact we want to hear about them so much that we’ve created a £5,000+ prize package, which one lucky tweeter will win. See the bottom of this post for details on how to enter our competition.

So what are some of the biggest challenges in joining things up…?


Next year you will mostly be working on...

Last week we launched a competition where the prize was a pair of tickets for this week’s Future Of Digital Marketing event, one of the highlights of the Econsultancy calendar.

We asked the question: “What will you be focused on in the next year and why?” 

We received dozens of entries and I have compiled a bunch of them here to reveal three common themes. There are some outliers of course, but the following entries broadly reflect our audience’s focus on devices, channel integration and engagement strategies...

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COMPETITION! Win two tickets to the Future of Digital Marketing

WINEvery year Econsultancy brings together some of the brightest brains in digital to figure out what’s on the horizon.

Now in its seventh year, our Future of Digital Marketing event (#FODM) is a brilliant way of filling your head with ideas by listening to a series of inspiring talks.

FODM takes place in London, next Wednesday (15 June). The day is split into three chunks: this year, next year, and beyond.

We’ve lined up some amazing speakers who will share practical insights and case studies on a range of subjects, including mobile, community management, online video, augmented reality, next-gen user experience, data, search, marketing automation and connected TV. 

We're giving away a pair of tickets to FODM, allowing the lucky winner and a friend / colleague to attend for free (seats are usually £440).

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Five ways to fight commoditization of your business

What's a company's worst nightmare? There are probably a few of them, but one of the worst is commoditization.

Finding your market filled with competition that looks almost identical to your business is a frustrating, disheartening experience, but it's a common one.

Thanks to the ease with which web-based applications and business models can be 'duplicated', most new internet companies will find themselves protected by narrow moats at best.


Econsultancy announces Red Friday: sell our stuff and win £10,000!

REd-Friday-win-10000Over the past ten years, Econsultancy has witnessed a lot of changes both on and offline.

From humble beginnings we’ve grown to become a community of almost 100,000 marketers, and seen digital marketing evolve beyond recognition, the rise of Google, Facebook and Twitter, along with the birth and development of entirely new industries like SEO, social media and m-commerce have changed the face of marketing over the past decade.

There’s no denying a lot’s changed, but there are a few things that remain the same year after year.

Take for example, the relentless commercialisation of the holiday season!

Every year we see tinsel in stores in July, Turkeys for sale in August and New Year sales that begin before the last one has ended, and frankly, we’re all for it! Who doesn’t need a bit of extra cash at this time of year? We certainly do!

Black Friday and Cyber Monday both saw record figures this year, so we’ve decided to leap on the bandwagon and introduce another red-letter date for your diary. We want you to join us over the next week as we celebrate ten years of the Big Red Dot - so we're offering our members the chance to win £10,000 on Red Friday!


Ten dangerous ideas for startup entrepreneurs

Starting a new business is a positive action, and in my experience most entrepreneurs are positive people. But sometimes that positivity can mask harsh realities that many entrepreneurs would rather ignore, and can lead them to buy into ideas that are detrimental to success.

Here are ten dangerous ideas that many startup entrepreneurs buy into that they shouldn't.


Match.com doesn't love the competition

One of the most lucrative markets in the consumer internet has been online dating. And one of the most successful players over the years has been Match.com. It's not difficult to see why: plenty of people are willing to pay for a chance at a date and Match.com has been successfully charging for them for more than a decade.

But business isn't so easy today. Newer competitors, many of them free, have gained traction, and one, Plentyoffish, is, according to comScore's numbers, the most popular dating site in the world. Apparently Match.com doesn't like that.


Is Twitter going to pull a bait and switch on developers?

Fred Wilson, a well-known venture capitalist whose firm has invested in Twitter, published a blog post earlier this week that raised eyebrows amongst third party developers who develop on the Twitter platform.

The reason? It sent an ominous message to many of them: Twitter might put you out of business soon.


Five reasons your inferior competitors are eating your lunch

You may know the feeling: you have a great product or service that puts the competition to shame. But the competition is winning far more business than you are. What gives?

As much as we'd like to believe that a superior product or service is the end all and be all of business success, it isn't. Sometimes the company that offers less wins more.